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The impact of restricted decision making autonomy on health care managers’ health and work performance
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3325-4184
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0861-6585
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Department of Sociology and Work Science, Gothenburg University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0480-1895
2019 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 706-714Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM:

The aim of this study was to investigate how restricted decision making autonomy and conflicting demands impact operational managers' work performance and health.

BACKGROUND:

Managers at operational level (first and second-line managers') in health care organizations are commonly exposed to strain in their work situation with high demands and a challenging work context. Although they play an important role, the knowledge about the causal associations between stressful job demands and their consequences is limited.

METHODS:

A prospective design with questionnaire data collected at two points in time, one year apart, from a sample of operational managers (N = 162) at five Swedish hospitals was used to conduct a structural equation model (SEM) analysis with cross-lagged paths.

RESULTS:

Restricted decision making autonomy was negatively associated with both the managers' health and their managerial work performance over time.

CONCLUSIONS:

Health care managers' work performance and health may be sustained by the top management allowing them a higher degree of autonomy in their decision making.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT:

This study suggests that nursing leaders should create the circumstances for operational managers' to have higher levels of autonomy in their area of responsibility and the freedom to prioritize their managerial workload. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 27, no 4, p. 706-714
Keywords [en]
autonomy, health, manager, Decision making, structural equation model, work performance
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15646DOI: 10.1111/jonm.12741PubMedID: 30565780OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-15646DiVA, id: diva2:1277399
Available from: 2019-01-10 Created: 2019-01-10 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved

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Larsson, SaraJutengren, GöranDellve, Lotta

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