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Interviewing children with home mechanical ventilation – privileges and challenges
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2972-6908
2017 (English)In: 23rd Annual Qualitative Health Research Conference 2017, Québec City, Québec, Canada, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Research that focuses on children living with home mechanical ventilation (HMV) and their own voices and perspective is sparse. Developments in medical technology, care and treatment have increased the survival of children with serious illnesses or injuries. This means that a raising numbers of technology-assisted children can live their lives in their own homes. Children with HMV are a part of this unique population. The underlying medical diagnosis varies and may cause severe functional limitations, for example difficulties to breathe, walk, eat, swallow and in some cases talk. Ventilator support may be required either during sleep or over 24 hours invasively (with tracheostomy) or non-invasively (with a facemask). The aim is to present experiences from interviewing children living with faltering voices and communication problems related to ventilator treatment. Nine interviews with children (age range 7-20 years) with HMV were conducted. Photovoice was used to supplement the data collection process. Challenges with interviewing will be presented such as individually tailoring the interview sessions to each person´s wishes, having a parent or a personal care assistant present at the interviews, and the privileges in being welcome to share a moment in the child´s daily life. Data were analyzed using an inductive and interpretive approach to qualitative content analysis. The comprehensive, careful and slow data analysis revealed that the parent's voice was sometimes a part of the voice of the child and had to be handled as one voice. The child's voice itself was not strong enough to conduct a long conversation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14254OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-14254DiVA, id: diva2:1209971
Conference
23rd Annual Qualitative Health Research Conference 2017, Québec City, May 1 - June 22, 2017
Available from: 2018-05-25 Created: 2018-05-25 Last updated: 2018-06-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf