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Textile as Artificial Nature - From Synthetic Sea Grass to Fibrous Implants,
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
2017 (English)In: Advances in Science and Technology, ISSN 1662-0356, Vol. 100, p. 181-186Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Sustainable development
The content falls within the scope of Sustainable Development
Abstract [en]

We develop the hypothesis that textile and nature have much in common and that in a time of biomimetics textile is a unique class of material that provides a bridge between artefacts, by definition synthetic, and biofacts - material entities found in and produced by nature, i.e. non-synthetic. Furthermore we formulate the (seemingly) contradictorily concept of Artificial Nature. Biomimetics sometimes emphasize the inspirational aspects so that science and technology get input from biology for new technological development for new artefacts. Artificial Nature instead emphasizes the other way around; adding sound, ecology based, technology to nature and in nature for enhancing ecosystem functions.Some characteristics of natural biofact materials and structures include pliability, softness, porosity, light weight, recyclability, and periodicity. Textiles are soft, foldable, of low weight, inherent porous, anisotropic as well as periodic, easily compatible with biodegradability and recyclability. Thus there are many similarities. These are discussed together with a number of cases where textiles are mimicking biofacts. We first look at synthetic see grass (Zostera marina) for remediation of one of the most important biotopes in the world where we show that textile processing techniques are able to make production efficient. Then we look at artificial leaves, i.e. photon collecting flexible patches and indicate the textile realization of such. One of the most valuable ecosystem services is the provision of clean water and maintaining a low degree of pollution in water is of outmost importance. Textile based water purification systems has been constructed and merged with fungus (Zygomycetes) we show the potential for enhancing wet land capability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 100, p. 181-186
National Category
Other Natural Sciences
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13503DOI: 10.4028/www.scientific.net/AST.100.181OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-13503DiVA, id: diva2:1174228
Available from: 2018-01-15 Created: 2018-01-15 Last updated: 2018-01-15Bibliographically approved

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Persson, Nils-Krister

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  • apa
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