Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Elderly patients with myocardial infarction selected for conservative or invasive treatment strategy.
Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4139-6235
2015 (English)In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, ISSN 1176-9092, E-ISSN 1178-1998, Vol. 10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There are limited data on patients aged >75 years with myocardial infarction (MI), especially those who are treated conservatively.

HYPOTHESIS: There are important differences in the clinical characteristics and outcome between elderly MI patients selected for invasive or conservative treatment strategy.

METHODS: A total of 1,413 elderly patients (>75 years old) admitted to Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden with a final diagnosis of acute MI in 2001 or 2007, were divided into two groups, those who underwent a conservative treatment strategy (conservative group [CG], n=1,169) and those who underwent coronary angiography and were revascularized if indicated (invasive group [IG], n=244).

RESULTS: Other than higher age in the CG, there were no significant differences in traditional risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, and smoking in the two groups. A higher proportion of patients in the CG had a history of heart failure and cerebrovascular disease. The hazard ratio (with 95% confidence interval), adjusted for potential confounders, for 5 year mortality in the IG in relation to the CG was 0.49 (0.39, 0.62), P<0.0001. Overall, in the elderly with MI, the proportion who underwent an invasive treatment strategy doubled from 12% in 2001 to 24% in 2007, despite a slightly higher mean age.

CONCLUSION: Elderly patients with MI in the CG (no coronary angiography), were generally older and a higher proportion had chronic diseases such as congestive heart failure and cerebrovascular disease than those in the IG. Our data suggest that the invasive treatment strategy is associated with better outcome. However, randomized trials will be needed to determine whether revascularization procedures are beneficial in elderly patients with MI, in terms of less symptoms, better outcome, and improved quality of life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 10
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-8448DOI: 10.2147/CIA.S74012ISI: 000348118500001PubMedID: 25653514OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-8448DiVA: diva2:1170639
Available from: 2018-01-04 Created: 2018-01-04 Last updated: 2018-01-04Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Herlitz, Johan

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Herlitz, Johan
By organisation
Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare
In the same journal
Clinical Interventions in Aging
Clinical Medicine

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf