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The effect of cycled lighting in the intensive care unit on sleep, activity and physiological parameters: A pilot study.
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9828-961X
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
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2017 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 41, 26-32 p., S0964-3397(17)30032-0Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Patients in intensive care suffer from severe illnesses or injuries and from symptoms related to care and treatments. Environmental factors, such as lighting at night, can disturb patients' circadian rhythms. The aim was to investigate whether patients displayed circadian rhythms and whether a cycled lighting intervention would impact it. In this pilot study (N=60), a cycled lighting intervention in a two-bed patient room was conducted. An ordinary hospital room functioned as the control. Patient activity, heart rate, mean arterial pressure and body temperature were recorded. All data were collected during the patients' final 24h in the intensive care unit. There was a significant difference between day and night patient activity within but not between conditions. Heart rates differed between day and night significantly for patients in the ordinary room but not in the intervention room or between conditions. Body temperature was lowest at night for all patients with no significant difference between conditions. Patients in both conditions had a natural circadian rhythm; and the cycled lighting intervention showed no significant impact. As the sample size was small, a larger repeated measures study should be conducted to determine if other types of lighting or environmental factors can impact patients' well-being.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 41, 26-32 p., S0964-3397(17)30032-0
Keyword [en]
Body temperature, Circadian rhythm, Critical care, Heart rate, Intensive care unit, Light, Mean arterial pressure, Motor activity, Sleep
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12870DOI: 10.1016/j.iccn.2017.01.009ISI: 000405251200006PubMedID: 28268055Scopus ID: 85014263045OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-12870DiVA: diva2:1149661
Available from: 2017-10-16 Created: 2017-10-16 Last updated: 2017-11-10

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Engwall, MarieFridh, IsabellJutengren, GöranBergbom, IngegerdSterner, AndersLindahl, Berit

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