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Pectin-based Composites
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. (Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7103-4628
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7377-0765
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. (Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery)
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. (Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4887-2433
2017 (English)In: Handbook of Composites from Renewable Materials: Biodegradable Materials, John Wiley & Sons, 2017, 487-518 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
Sustainable development
The content falls within the scope of Sustainable Development
Abstract [en]

One third of the cell wall of vascular plants is composed of pectin, which serves as the cementing material for the cellulosic network, behaving as a stabilized gel. Industrially, pectin is produced from juice and sugar production waste. Different sources and extraction conditions result in diversity in characteristics and applications of pectin. Most commonly, pectin is used in the food industry as a gelling and thickening agent and it is favored in the pharmaceutical industry as a carrier for colon-specific drugs. Pectin has good potential to be utilized as a matrix in production of environmentally friendly film packaging as well as biocomposite materials. Pectin is sensitive to chemical reactions and promotes the homogeneous immobilization of cells, genes, and proteins. However, due to limited mechanical properties pectin is not used for structural applications but instead rather for composites in which its biodegradable properties can be utilized. Pectin is often reinforced with hydroxyapatite and biphasic calcium phosphate for bone regeneration and tissue engineering applications. It can also be used as a biosorbent for copper removal from aqueous solutions. Active packaging of nanohybrids composed of pectin and halloysite nanotubes that are loaded with rosemary essential oil is another application of pectin-based composites.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017. 487-518 p.
Keyword [en]
pectin, biodegradable, composite, nanocomposite, renewable, reinforcement
National Category
Composite Science and Engineering
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12108ISBN: 978-1-119-22379-5 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-12108DiVA: diva2:1090738
Available from: 2017-04-25 Created: 2017-04-25 Last updated: 2017-05-04Bibliographically approved

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Bátori, VeronikaÅkesson, DanZamani, AkramTaherzadeh, Mohammad J
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