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Customisation and fashion Logistics Effects of Flat Knitted Fashion Products Using Complete Garment Technology SAMAND' OR - A Case Study
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8039-5641
2016 (English)In: Journal of Textile Science & Engineering, ISSN 2165-8064, Vol. 6, no 1, 1-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Sustainable development
The content falls within the scope of Sustainable Development
Abstract [en]

One of the identified problems in the textile and fashion business of today is that much of the garments that are bought must be sold in the stores at discounted prices, which results in poor results such as, low sell-through percentage, stock-turnover and lost-sales. The study in this article suggests that a combination of mass customisation (MC), complete garment knitting technology and supply chain management can show an alternative way to overcome this drawback for customised knitted products. Fernie and Azuma [1] state that one direction for the fashion industry may be to reconsider the option of more domestic manufacturing in the future. For many years the trend in the textile and fashion business has been to source production in low-income countries in order to maximise gross profit margins for the company. Can domestic production combined with MC be an option for the future to be successful in fashion retailing?

 

Supply Chain Management (SCM) is now seen as a broader concept of manufacturing and retailing than earlier views that limited it to individual companies. In a chain for textiles and apparel, all parts must be synchronised and able to adapt to demands on the market. This is especially crucial for the types of products that fashion represents shown in the study of Bruce & Daly et al. [2]. Nowadays research shows that SCM focuses on relationships between those in the supply chain [3,4]. SCM takes a wide view of configurations, which Gattorna [5] defines as “any combination of processes, functions, activities, relationships and pathways along which products, services, information and financial transactions move in and between enterprises, in both di

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Los Angeles, 2016. Vol. 6, no 1, 1-8 p.
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-11835DOI: 10.4172/2165-8064.1000232OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-11835DiVA: diva2:1066796
Available from: 2017-01-19 Created: 2017-01-19 Last updated: 2017-01-19Bibliographically approved

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Peterson, Joel

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