Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Techno-economic analysis of integrating first and second-generation ethanol production using filamentous fungi: An industrial case study
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. (Resource Recovery)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4887-2433
2016 (English)In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 9, no 5, 359Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Sustainable development
The content falls within the scope of Sustainable Development
Abstract [en]

The 2nd generation plants producing ethanol from lignocelluloses demand risky and high investment costs. This paper presents the energy- and economical evaluations for integrating lignocellulose in current 1st generation dry mill ethanol processes, using filamentous fungi. Dry mills use grains and have mills, liquefactions, saccharifications, fermentation, and distillation to produce ethanol, while their stillage passes centrifugation, and evaporation to recycle the water and dry the cake and evaporated syrup into animal feed. In this work, a bioreactor was considered to cultivate fungi on the stillage either before or after the centrifugation step together with pretreated lignocellulosic wheat bran. The results showed that the integrated 1st and 2nd generation ethanol process requires a capital investment of 77 million USD, which could yield NPV of 162 million USD after 20 years. Compared to the fungal cultivation on thin stillage modified 1st generation process, the integrated process resulted in 53 million USD higher NPV. The energy analysis showed that the thin stillage modified 1st generation process could reduce the overall energy consumption by 2.5% and increase the ethanol production by 4%. Such modifications in the 1st generation processes and integration concepts could be interesting for the ethanol industries, as integrating lignocelluloses to their existing setup requires less capital investment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 9, no 5, 359
Keyword [en]
process design, techno-economic analysis, process integration, lignocelluloses, ethanol
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-11457DOI: 10.3390/en9050359ISI: 000377263400051Scopus ID: 84968754747OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-11457DiVA: diva2:1056206
Available from: 2016-12-14 Created: 2016-12-14 Last updated: 2017-02-01Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1592 kB)48 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1592 kBChecksum SHA-512
1d5f5f62ceb98f8cc6c1da92e2bb63523e10308977e8c652c4830ad52ebe110dbe1d6b1d82a536215781ef8c83d1e29da41bcad9796251b7ed63822e90388c0c
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
By organisation
Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business
In the same journal
Energies
Industrial Biotechnology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 48 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 24 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf