Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Fungal biomass and ethanol from lignocelluloses using Rhizopus pellets under simultaneous saccharification, filtration, and fermentation (SSFF)
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. (Resource Recovery)
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. (Resource Recovery)
Show others and affiliations
2016 (English)In: Biofuel Research Journal, ISSN 2292-8782, Vol. 9, 372-378 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Sustainable development
The content falls within the scope of Sustainable Development
Abstract [en]

The economic viability of the 2nd generation bioethanol production process cannot rely on a single product but on a biorefinery built around it. In this work, ethanol and fungal biomass (animal feed) were produced from acid-pretreated wheat straw slurry under an innovative simultaneous saccharification, fermentation, and filtration (SSFF) strategy. A membrane unit separated the solids from the liquid and the latter was converted to biomass or to both biomassand ethanol in the fermentation reactor containing Rhizopus sp. pellets. Biomass yields of up to 0.34 g/g based on the consumed monomeric sugars and acetic acid were achieved. A surplus of glucose in the feed resulted in ethanol production and reduced the biomass yield, whereas limiting glucose concentrations resulted in higher consumption of xylose and acetic acid. The specific growth rate, in the range of 0.013-0.015/h, did not appear to be influenced by the composition of the carbon source. Under anaerobic conditions, an ethanol yield of 0.40 g/g was obtained. The present strategy benefits fromthe easier separation of the biomass from the medium and the fungus ability to assimilate carbon residuals in comparison with when yeast is used. More specifically, it allows in-situ separation of insoluble solids leading to the production of pure fungal biomass as a value-added product. (C) 2016 BRTeam. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 9, 372-378 p.
Keyword [en]
Cellulosic ethanol, Animalfeed, Rhizopus sp, SSFF, Wheat straw
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-11456ISI: 000371473300006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-11456DiVA: diva2:1056203
Available from: 2016-12-14 Created: 2016-12-14 Last updated: 2016-12-21Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(4464 kB)59 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 4464 kBChecksum SHA-512
91e5c8041ffd5ee2fb8a2b30e82e5b6894d1f1d140d765b82d8062056da7c3727c5e46c595807bdce974a8edf21705da9b3819af9ce0a222e27677333e38854f
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ferreira, Jorge A.Lennartsson, Patrik R.Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
By organisation
Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business
Industrial Biotechnology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 59 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Total: 387 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf