Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
It’s not just about making them talk: Some thoughts and experiences on interviewing children in research
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. (människan i vården)
Jönköping University. (CHILD)
Jönköping University. (CHILD)
Jönköping University. (CHILD)
2016 (English)In: Nordic Conference on Nursing Research 2016: Methods and Networks for the future, 2016Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Sustainable development
The content falls within the scope of Sustainable Development
Abstract [en]

It’s not just about making them talk - thoughts and experiences on interviewing children in research

Historically, children’s views have not been valued in medical care.  In research, children have been seen as a vulnerable group, difficult to access and unable to tell their story. Many proxy studies have been performed where health care staff and parents have given their views about what they think the child experiences. However,it is difficult to draw valid conclusions about the child´s experience using proxy valuations. Children have the right and the ability to contribute unique information about their own experiences. These views are valuable in providing evidence based care.

The aim of this paper is to share experiences and thoughts gained from interviewing children with cancer aged 3-13 years of age.

Young children (from 3 years of age) have sufficient mental ability, cognition and concepts to describe experiences– just not in the same way as adults. They are able to articulate their experiences, providing the interview context feels safe, questions and props are developmentally appropriate and the interviewer follows the child’s leads. Special considerations need to be taken such as how to best inform them about the study, ethical issues, where and when to undertake the interview, how long the interview should be, how to make the child talk in the interview and which elucidating devices/props  can  be used during the interview as facilitators.  Parental contributions to child interviews can be useful as long as focus is kept on the child’s experiences. Interviewing over several time points gives new insights.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-11180OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-11180DiVA: diva2:1055787
Conference
Nordic Conference on Nursing Research 2016
Available from: 2016-12-13 Created: 2016-11-28 Last updated: 2017-03-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(12 kB)31 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 12 kBChecksum SHA-512
090b5ff64303bae183662c02ed62e53553b905388284cd15d364e643afe1147342743ad2aaa56b64f7e74a1c971c2729ddc180efbaa7852dca80a6b280a0107a
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Darcy, Laura
By organisation
Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare
Nursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 31 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Total: 50 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf