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Application of cell culture technology and genetic engineering for production of future foods and crop improvement to strengthen food security
Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
Universitat Bayreuth, Germany.
Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
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2021 (English)In: Bioengineered, ISSN 2165-5979, E-ISSN 2165-5987, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 11305-11330Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Sustainable development
According to the author(s), the content of this publication falls within the area of sustainable development.
Abstract [en]

The growing population and the climate changes put a pressure on food production globally, therefore a fundamental transformation of food production is required. One approach to accelerate food production is application of modern biotechnology such as cell culture, marker assisted selection, and genetic engineering. Cell culture technology reduces the usage of arable land, while marker-assisted selection increases the genetic gain of crop breeding and genetic engineering enable to introduce a desired traits to crop. The cell culture technology has resulted in development of cultured meat, fungal biomass food (mycoprotein), and bioactive compounds from plant cell culture. Except cultured meat which recently begin to penetrate the market, the other products have been in the market for years. The marker-assisted selection and genetic engineering have contributed significantly to increase the resiliency against emerging pests and abiotic stresses. This review addresses diverse techniques of cell culture technology as well as advanced genetic engineering technology CRISPR Cas-9 and its application for crop improvement. The pros and cons of different techniques as well as the challenges and future perspective of application of modern biotechnology for strengthening food security are also discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2021. Vol. 12, no 2, p. 11305-11330
Keywords [en]
Cultured meat, mycoprotein, genetic engineering, CRISPR-Cas9, Agrobacterium transformation, SODIUM/PROTON ANTIPORTER GENE, SALT TOLERANCE, REGULATORY CHALLENGES, PARTICLE BOMBARDMENT, CONSUMER ACCEPTANCE, NUTRITIONAL-VALUE, SKELETAL-MUSCLE, ODOR COMPOUNDS, GOLDEN RICE, STEM-CELLS
National Category
Food Engineering Agricultural Science
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-27018DOI: 10.1080/21655979.2021.2003665ISI: 000725245400001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85120751303OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-27018DiVA, id: diva2:1619571
Available from: 2021-12-13 Created: 2021-12-13 Last updated: 2022-01-28Bibliographically approved

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Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

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