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The Potential Importance of Social Capital and Job Crafting for Work Engagement and Job Satisfaction among Health-Care Employees
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-141 57 Huddinge, Sweden.
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Department of Sociology and Work Science, University of Gothenburg, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0480-1895
Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-141 57 Huddinge, Sweden.
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

(1) Background: Both employees and organizations benefit from a work environment characterized by work engagement and job satisfaction. This study examines the influence of work-group social capital on individuals’ work engagement, job satisfaction, and job crafting. In addition, the mediating effect of job crafting between social capital on the one side and job satisfaction and work engagement on the other side was analyzed. (2) Methods: This study used data from 250 health-care employees in Sweden who had completed a questionnaire at two time points (six to eight months apart). Analyses of separate cross-lagged panel designs were conducted using structural regression modeling with manifest variables. (3) Results: Social capital was predictive of both job satisfaction and work engagement over time. The results also indicated that higher degrees of social capital was predictive of more cognitive and relational, but not task-related job crafting over time. There was no clear evidence for a mediating effect of job crafting for social capital to work engagement or job satisfaction. (4) Conclusion: It would be beneficial for the health-care sector to consider setting up the organizations to promote social capital within work groups. Individual workers would gain in well-being and the organization is likely to gain in efficiency and lower turnover rates.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI , 2020. Vol. 17, no 12
Keywords [en]
social capital, job crafting, well-being, health care, mediating effect
National Category
Psychology Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-24836DOI: 10.3390/ijerph17124272ISI: 000549280700001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85086686838OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-24836DiVA, id: diva2:1520946
Available from: 2021-01-21 Created: 2021-01-21 Last updated: 2021-10-21Bibliographically approved

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Jutengren, GöranDellve, Lotta

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