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Enabling Well-Being in Young Adults Living with Existential Concerns
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
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(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background 

What enables well-being when experiencing existential concerns as a young adult is an under-explored area of research. In order to address young adults’ existential concerns and provide caring support that builds their resilience to meet life challenges, the aim of the present study is to describe the meaning of enabling well-being as experienced by young adults living with existential concerns. 

Method 

This phenomenological study is based on a reflective lifeworld research. Seventeen young adults, nine women and eight men aged 17–27 years, were interviewed. The results is presented in an essential meaning and further explored with its variations and individual nuances of the phenomenon; enabling well-being.  

Ethics  

The study followed the research principles described in the Helsinki Declaration and the Swedish Research Ethics Guidelines. 

Result 

The essential meaning of enabling well-being, when experiencing existential concerns as a young adult, means finding a place to rest. Finding a place to rest means finding both movement and stillness in life to reflect upon one’s life story in order to understand oneself. The essence is further described in the following constituents: recovering in solitude, sharing one’s life story in everyday life, and reflecting one´s life story in a trusting and caring relationship. 

Conclusion 

This study contributes important knowledge from a caring science perspective to inform caring approaches in nursing. The results show that young adults enable their own well-being in many ways when experiencing existential concerns. When their existential concerns feel overwhelming, they need support from healthcare professionals. When young adults seek professional support, the professionals must be open and focus on the young adults’ life story. 

Keywords [en]
Existential concerns, reflective lifeworld research, phenomenology, qualitative research, young adults
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care; The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-24429OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-24429DiVA, id: diva2:1510508
Available from: 2020-12-16 Created: 2020-12-16 Last updated: 2022-11-01Bibliographically approved

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Lundvall, MariaPalmér, LinaCarlsson, GunillaLindberg, Elisabeth

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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Output format
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