Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Young men’s experiences of living with existential concerns: “living close to a bottomless darkness”
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. University of Borås, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1887-2029
Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för hälso- och vårdvetenskap (HV).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8115-5359
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. University of Borås, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4319-4584
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. University of Borås, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 1-10, article id 1810947Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction

Young men may struggle in life with challenges of various concerns about their identity and who they want to be in life. Many health issues arise from social norms and wider societal determinations and for today’s young men, following such norms poses a risk of losing oneself. An essential part of health are connected to the existential dimensions in life and concerns who you are, and how well you know and understand yourself. However; little is known about what it means for young men to live a life with existential concerns.

Purpose and method

The purpose of this phenomenological study, based on reflective lifeworld research (RLR), is to describe young men’s experiences of living with existential concerns for which they have sought support. Eight lifeworld interviews were conducted.

Results

The results essentially show that young men living with existential concerns describe their situations as living close to a bottomless darkness. This is further described according to four constituents: enduring everyday life, striving for a solution, hearing an inner self-critical voice, and wearing a hard shell.

Conclusion

We conclude that strengthening young men’s health processes requires healthcare professionals to create an atmosphere where young men feel safe talking about existential concerns without feeling exposed and vulnerable.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis , 2020. Vol. 15, no 1, p. 1-10, article id 1810947
Keywords [en]
Existential concerns, reflective lifeworld research, phenomenology, qualitative research, young men, young adults
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-24428DOI: 10.1080/17482631.2020.1810947ISI: 000563076400001PubMedID: 32854600Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85089985748OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-24428DiVA, id: diva2:1510503
Available from: 2020-12-16 Created: 2020-12-16 Last updated: 2022-11-01Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Sårbarhet, mod och inbjudan: Unga vuxnas strävan efter välbefinnande i en tillvaro präglad av existentiell oro
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sårbarhet, mod och inbjudan: Unga vuxnas strävan efter välbefinnande i en tillvaro präglad av existentiell oro
2020 (Swedish)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Aim: The overall aim of the thesis is to examine how young adults experiences life living with existential concerns and how well-being is enabled when living with existential concerns. 

Approach and method: A reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach guided this dissertation’s methodological approach. Lifeworld interviews were performed in all four studies and analyses were conducted according to RLR principles: bridled attitude, openness, and compliance to the studies’ different phenomena. Study I describes healthcare professionals’ experiences of conversations with young adults experiencing existential concerns. Eleven lifeworld interviews (seven individual-, two pair- and two group interviews) were conducted with seventeen healthcare professionals from various fields. Data was analysed via phenomenological-based thematic meaning analysis. Studies II and III describes young adults’ experiences of existential concerns from the perspective of young women and young men; nine women (study II) and eight men (study III) participated. All interviews were individual lifeworld interviews. Study IV describes young adults’ experiences of enabling wellbeing in a life with existential concerns. Seventeen adults (same participants as study II and III) participated and all interviews were individual lifeworld interviews. Studies II, III, and IV were analysed by phenomenological analysis. 

Main results: The results show that the lives of young adults with existential concerns are significantly affected by these concerns. Existential concerns awaken vulnerability, characterized by feeling lost in life and living near a bottomless darkness in which life may seem unbearable. In such a vulnerable existence, there is a desire to find a place to rest, thereby enabling wellbeing. For young adults, vulnerability means having the courage to expose their life situation and innermost thoughts. In encounters with others, there is a risk of being condemned, neglected, identified as weak, or rejected. In a caring relationship between young adults and healthcare professionals, both young adults and healthcare professionals’ vulnerability to life’s fragility evokes. Courage means daring to expose one’s vulnerability and sharing one’s life story. Courage also means that healthcare professionals dare to remain in the caring relationship and listen to the young adult’s life story, no matter how dire or dark it seems. In order for the life story to stand out, a mutual invitation between young adults and healthcare professionals is required. The results show that the prerequisites for a caring relationship involve mutual vulnerability, courage, and invitation to reflect on life’s challenges. In a genuinely caring relationship, through existential confirmation, entails finding a place to rest that enables wellbeing when experiencing existential concerns as a young adult. 

Conclusion: The thesis contributes knowledge relating to how young adults experience life with existential concerns and, in turn, how wellbeing is enabled through the experiences of young adults and healthcare professionals. Existential concern is a complex phenomenon, involving vulnerability, courage, and the invitation to enable wellbeing. From a lifeworld theoretical perspective, we see an openness to existential dimensions in young adults’ life stories, providing guidance to caregivers in enabling young adults to find a place where they can be vulnerable and have an opportunity to recover.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Borås: Högskolan i Borås, 2020
Series
Skrifter från Högskolan i Borås, ISSN 0280-381X ; 115
Keywords
Young adults, healthcare professionals, existential concerns, reflective lifeworld research, caring sciences, caring relationship, phenomenology
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-24028 (URN)978-91-89271-07-4 (ISBN)978-91-89271-08-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2021-01-15, M404, Sandgärdet, Borås, 09:30
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

Disputationen sänds via videolänk, förinformation se kalendariet på hb.se/forskning.

Available from: 2020-12-18 Created: 2020-11-12 Last updated: 2022-08-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(676 kB)274 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 676 kBChecksum SHA-512
86d5fbebd925cd17b15b2243186f3d83ced797d4bf5775ff2cc689ac76f768cc664ba78929cf2ad20a89dadc2a45cdd153f96c647bf298fec27aaafcd8649829
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records

Lundvall, MariaPalmér, LinaCarlsson, GunillaLindberg, Elisabeth

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lundvall, MariaHörberg, UlricaPalmér, LinaCarlsson, GunillaLindberg, Elisabeth
By organisation
Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare
In the same journal
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being
Nursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 274 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 247 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf