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A review of integration strategies of lignocelluloses and other wastes in 1st generation bioethanol processes
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0743-1335
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
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2018 (English)In: Process Biochemistry, ISSN 1359-5113, E-ISSN 1873-3298, Vol. 75, p. 173-186Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Sustainable development
According to the author(s), the content of this publication falls within the area of sustainable development.
Abstract [en]

First-generation ethanol plants offer successful, commercial-scale bioprocesses that can, at least partially, replace fossil fuels. They can act as platforms to integrate lignocelluloses, wastes and residuals when establishing 2nd generation ethanol. The present review gathers recent insights on the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic substrates into lot generation ethanol plants, through microbial conversion or cogeneration systems. It shows that, among different lot generation ethanol plants, sugar-based ethanol by-products, dominate integration studies characterized by strong techno-economic and life-cycle assessment components. In comparison, there are fewer studies that focus on grain-derived lignocellulosic residuals and other wastes. There is consensus that integrating second generation feedstocks into first generation plants can have positive techno-economic and environmental impacts. In addition to realizing production of ethanol from 2nd generation feedstocks, these possibilities can impact waste management by establishing relevant biorefineries and circular economy. They can also supply a wide range of renewable products. Considering the potential of this waste management strategy, further research on these and many other substrates is needed. This will shed light on the effect of the integration, the relevant types of microorganisms and pretreatments, and of other physical parameters on the effectiveness of running lot generation plants with integrated second generation feedstocks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd , 2018. Vol. 75, p. 173-186
Keywords [en]
biorefinery, filamentous fungi, 1st generation ethanol, 2nd dgeneration ethanol, lignocelluloses, wastes
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15617DOI: 10.1016/j.procbio.2018.09.006ISI: 000453624000021Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85053840376OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-15617DiVA, id: diva2:1276524
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved

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Ferreira, JorgeBrancoli, PedroAgnihotri, SwarnimaBolton, KimTaherzadeh, Mohammad J

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