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A design technique for irreversible patterns
University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles. (Smart Textiles)
University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles. (Smart Textiles)
2009 (English)Other (Other academic)
Resource type
Three dimensional object
Abstract [en]

A new design technique for irreversible textile patterns has been developed. This technique can be compared with commonly used burn-out techniques (Ausbrenner etc.), but without using chemicals. Kanthal, a highly resistant heating wire, was knitted together with a blend of “conventional” textile yarns like cotton, wool, polyester and viscose into twelve different textile samples. In the samples, about five courses of heating wire were embroidered into parallel connections with a copper yarn. The textile samples were put on wooden frames and connected to a power supply. As the heating wires get hot, burned out patterns appear. The material combinations react to heat in different ways and the grade of expression varies in the samples. Some materials melt, others become dark/burned and some vanish or burn very quickly. The burned out expression depends on a range of factors such as the textile construction, access to oxygen, yarn combinations, length and number of heating wires used for the parallel connections, power supply etc. Being able to design a textile material by incorporating heat directly into the textile construction is considered as a new design technique for burned out patterns. By this technique, colour and structure changes in the material can be affected to create an aesthetic expression designing holes, stripes or cuts etc. The design technique enables a novel way of decorating a textile after a fabric is produced. It would be possible use this technique for showing information through colour- and structure changes in the textile using it as an ambient textile display. Technique: knitting, embroidery Materials: Kanthal, Kevlar, cotton, wool, polyester, viscose

Place, publisher, year, pages
2009.
Keywords [en]
smart textiles, interaction design, dynamic patterns, knitted circuits, Smart textiles, interaction design
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-5303Local ID: 2320/5827OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-5303DiVA, id: diva2:884731
Note

Sponsorship:

Acknowledgment: Tommy Martinsson, Knitting

Depattment/Swedish School of Textiles, IFP,

Swerea, Smart Textiles through Vinnväxt

Available from: 2015-12-17 Created: 2015-12-17 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved

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Authority records BETA

Persson, AnnaWorbin, Linda

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf