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Svensson, Sofie
Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Benedikt Maria Köhnlein, M., Abitbol, T., Osório Oliveira, A., Magnusson, M. S., Adolfsson, K. H., Svensson, S., . . . Zamani, A. (2022). Bioconversion of food waste to biocompatible wet-laid fungal films. Materials & design, 216, Article ID 110534.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioconversion of food waste to biocompatible wet-laid fungal films
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2022 (English)In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 216, article id 110534Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The fungus Rhizopus delemar was grown on bread waste in a submerged cultivation process and wet-laid into films. Alkali or enzyme treatments were used to isolate the fungal cell wall. A heat treatment was also applied to deactivate biological activity of the fungus. Homogenization of fungal biomass was done by an iterative ultrafine grinding process. Finally, the biomass was cast into films by a wet-laid process. Ultrafine grinding resulted in densification of the films. Fungal films showed tensile strengths of up to 18.1 MPa, a Young's modulus of 2.3 GPa and a strain at break of 1.4%. Highest tensile strength was achieved using alkali treatment, with SEM analysis showing a dense and highly organized structure. In contrast, less organized structures were obtained using enzymatic or heat treatments. A cell viability assay and fluorescent staining confirmed the biocompatibility of the films. A promising route for food waste valorization to sustainable fungal wet-laid films was established. © 2022 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Biocompatible, Filamentous fungi, Food waste, Ultrafine grinding, Wet-laid film, Zygomycetes, Bioactivity, Elastic moduli, Fungi, Grinding (machining), Heat treatment, Tensile strength, Alkali treatment, Cultivation process, Filamentous fungus, Organized structure, Rhizopus delemar, Submerged cultivation, Ultra-fine grinding, Biocompatibility
National Category
Other Industrial Biotechnology Bio Materials Polymer Chemistry
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-27825 (URN)10.1016/j.matdes.2022.110534 (DOI)000806351300008 ()2-s2.0-85126375844 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2018-04093
Available from: 2022-05-04 Created: 2022-05-04 Last updated: 2023-02-20
Svensson, S., Oliveira, A. O., Adolfsson, K. H., Heinmaa, I., Root, A., Kondori, N., . . . Zamani, A. (2022). Turning food waste to antibacterial and biocompatible fungal chitin/chitosan monofilaments. International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, 209, 618-630
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Turning food waste to antibacterial and biocompatible fungal chitin/chitosan monofilaments
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2022 (English)In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 209, p. 618-630Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Here, cell wall of a zygomycete fungus, Rhizopus delemar, grown on bread waste was wet spun into monofilaments. Using the whole cell wall material omits the common chitosan isolation and purification steps and leads to higher material utilization. The fungal cell wall contained 36.9% and 19.7% chitosan and chitin, respectively. Solid state NMR of the fungal cell wall material confirmed the presence of chitosan, chitin, and other carbohydrates. Hydrogels were prepared by ultrafine grinding of the cell wall, followed by addition of lactic acid to protonate the amino groups of chitosan, and subsequently wet spun into monofilaments. The monofilament inhibited the growth of Bacillus megaterium (Gram+ bacterium) and Escherichia coli (Gram- bacterium) significantly (92.2% and 99.7% respectively). Cytotoxicity was evaluated using an in vitro assay with human dermal fibroblasts, indicating no toxic inducement from exposure of the monofilaments. The antimicrobial and biocompatible fungal monofilaments, open new avenues for sustainable biomedical textiles from abundant food waste. © 2022 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Antibacterial, Biocompatibility, MAS NMR, Chitin/chitosan, Fungal textiles, Wet spinning
National Category
Organic Chemistry Other Industrial Biotechnology Microbiology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-27826 (URN)10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2022.04.031 (DOI)000919073000003 ()2-s2.0-85128311260 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2018-04093ÅForsk (Ångpanneföreningen's Foundation for Research and Development), 18-449European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), TK134
Available from: 2022-05-04 Created: 2022-05-04 Last updated: 2024-05-08
Svensson, S., Ferreira, J., Hakkarainen, M., Adolfsson, K. H. & Zamani, A. (2021). Fungal textiles: Wet spinning of fungal microfibers to produce monofilament yarns. Sustainable Materials and Technologies, 28, Article ID e00256.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fungal textiles: Wet spinning of fungal microfibers to produce monofilament yarns
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2021 (English)In: Sustainable Materials and Technologies, ISSN 2214-9937, Vol. 28, article id e00256Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The cell wall of a zygomycetes fungus was successfully wet spun into monofilament yarns and demonstrated as a novel resource for production of sustainable textiles. Furthermore, the fungus could be cultivated on bread waste, an abundant food waste with large negative environmental impact if not further utilized. Rhizopus delemar was first cultivated in bread waste in a bubble column bioreactor. The fungal cell wall collected through alkali treatment of fungal biomass contained 36 and 23% glucosamine and N-acetyl glucosamine representing chitosan and chitin in the cell wall, respectively. The amino groups of chitosan were protonated by utilizing acetic or lactic acid. This resulted in the formation of a uniform hydrogel of fungal microfibers. The obtained hydrogel was wet spun into an ethanol coagulation bath to form an aggregated monofilament, which was finally dried. SEM images confirmed the alignment of fungal microfibers along the monofilament axis. The wet spun monofilaments had tensile strengths up to 69.5 MPa and Young's modulus of 4.97 GPa. This work demonstrates an environmentally benign procedure to fabricate renewable fibers from fungal cell wall cultivated on abundant food waste, which opens a window to creation of sustainable fungal textiles.

Keywords
Chitin, Chitosan, Filamentous fungi, Zygomycetes, Wet spinning, Monofilaments
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-25100 (URN)10.1016/j.susmat.2021.e00256 (DOI)000663234300010 ()2-s2.0-85100376426 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2018-04093
Available from: 2021-03-01 Created: 2021-03-01 Last updated: 2024-05-08Bibliographically approved
Åkesson, D., Kumar Ramamoorthy, S., Bohlén, M., Skrifvars, V.-V., Svensson, S. & Skrifvars, M. (2021). Thermo-oxidative aging of high-density polyethylene reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Journal of Applied Polymer Science, 138(26), Article ID 50609.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thermo-oxidative aging of high-density polyethylene reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes
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2021 (English)In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 138, no 26, article id 50609Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of aging on the properties of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) reinforced with multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Nanocomposites were prepared with nanotubes at 0, 1, 3, and 5 wt%. The long-term durability of the prepared materials was evaluated by thermo-oxidative aging test. Test bodies were aged at 110°C for up to 10 weeks. The nanocomposites were characterized by differential scanning calometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), 13C-NMR, elongation at break, and transmission electron microscopy. The aging mainly occurred on the surface of the samples and the neat HDPE showed a strong yellowing after the aging. A strong reduction in elongation at break was seen. For neat HDPE, the elongation at break was reduced from roughly 1400–25%. When HDPE was reinforced with the nanotubes, the reduction was less dramatic

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
College of William and Mary, 2021
Keywords
aging, fullerenes, graphene, nanostructured polymers, nanotubes, Aliphatic compounds, Durability, Elongation, High density polyethylenes, High resolution transmission electron microscopy, Nanocomposites, Reinforced plastics, Reinforcement, Scanning electron microscopy, Testing, Thermogravimetric analysis, 13C NMR, Calometry, Elongation at break, High density polyethylene(HDPE), Long term durability, Thermo-oxidative aging, Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCN)
National Category
Polymer Chemistry
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-25904 (URN)10.1002/app.50609 (DOI)000618087300001 ()2-s2.0-85101454810 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-07-12 Created: 2021-07-12 Last updated: 2021-07-12
Svensson, S., Bucuricova, L., Ferreira, J., Souza Filho, P. F., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Zamani, A. (2021). Valorization of Bread Waste to a Fiber- and Protein-Rich Fungal Biomass. Fermentation, 7(2)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Valorization of Bread Waste to a Fiber- and Protein-Rich Fungal Biomass
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2021 (English)In: Fermentation, ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 7, no 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Filamentous fungi can be used for the valorization of food waste as a value-added product. The goal of this study was the valorization of bread waste through fungal cultivation and the production of value-added products. The fungal cultivation was verified for upscaling from shake flasks to a bench-scale bioreactor (4.5 L) and a pilot-scale bioreactor (26 L). The fungus showed the ability to grow without any additional enzymes or nutrients, and it was able to consume a bread concentration of 4.5% (w/v) over 48 h. The biomass concentration in the shake flasks was 4.1 g/L at a 2.5% bread concentration, which increased to 22.5 g/L at a 15% bread concentration. The biomass concentrations obtained after 48 h of cultivation using a 4.5% bread concentration were 7.2–8.3 and 8.0 g/L in 4.5 and 26 L bioreactors, respectively. Increasing the aeration rate in the 4.5 L bioreactor decreased the amount of ethanol produced and slightly reduced the protein content of the fungal biomass. The initial protein value in the bread was around 13%, while the protein content in the harvested fungal biomass ranged from 27% to 36%. The nutritional value of the biomass produced was evaluated by analyzing the amino acids and fatty acids. This study presents the valorization of bread waste through the production of a protein- and fatty-acid-rich fungal biomass that is simultaneously a source of microfibers.

Keywords
Rhizopus delemar, food waste, fungal biomass, bread waste, filamentous fungi, mycoprotein, fungal microfibers
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-25495 (URN)10.3390/fermentation7020091 (DOI)000665170100001 ()2-s2.0-85108511574 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-06-07 Created: 2021-06-07 Last updated: 2024-05-08Bibliographically approved
Svensson, S., Åkesson, D. & Bohlén, M. (2020). Reprocessing of High-Density Polyethylene Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes. Journal of Polymers and the Environment, 28(7), 1967-1973
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reprocessing of High-Density Polyethylene Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes
2020 (English)In: Journal of Polymers and the Environment, ISSN 1566-2543, E-ISSN 1572-8919, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 1967-1973Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High-density polyethylene (HDPE) was compounded with 3 wt% carbon nanotubes (CNTs). In order to simulate mechanical recycling, both the nanocomposite and neat HDPE were repeatedly extruded and subsequently analysed by tensile tests, Charpy impact strength, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), oxidation induction time (OIT), Gel Performance Chromatography (GPC), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and TEM After 10 cycles of extrusion, thermal, mechanical, and rheological tests did not reveal any significant degradation. In order to better study the effect of the CNTs, a large number of cycles were simulated by processing the materials for up to 200 min. After 200 min of processing, the neat HDPE was significantly degraded whereas the nanocomposite was almost unaffected.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Nanocomposite, Recycling, Repeated processing, Carbon nanotubes, HDPE
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-24854 (URN)10.1007/s10924-020-01739-2 (DOI)000529719400002 ()2-s2.0-85085154424 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-01-21 Created: 2021-01-21 Last updated: 2023-10-12Bibliographically approved
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