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Fuentes, Christian, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6687-274x
Publications (10 of 38) Show all publications
Sörum, N. & Fuentes, C. (2023). How sociotechnical imaginaries shape consumers’ experiences of and responses to commercial data collection practices. Consumption, markets & culture, 26(1), 24-46
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How sociotechnical imaginaries shape consumers’ experiences of and responses to commercial data collection practices
2023 (English)In: Consumption, markets & culture, ISSN 1025-3866, E-ISSN 1477-223X, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 24-46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How is the ongoing “datafication” in society experienced by consumers? Critical discussions regarding the impact of datafication on consumers seldom study consumers’ actual experiences. Conversely, the studies that do exist of consumers and their experiences of datafication tend to take an individualistic approach, arguing that how consumers experience and respond to the ongoing datafication is the result of their individual psychological make-up or the result of processes of cost–benefit calculations. Against that background, this article will instead show that the ways in which consumers experience and respond to datafication is linked to a number of broader sociotechnical imaginaries. Based on in-depth user interviews and drawing on previous work on sociotechnical imaginaries, this article develops an analysis of consumers’ multiple imaginaries of data collection practices. Findings show that how consumers approach data collection operations is shaped by sociotechnical imaginaries that were both individually and collectively performed by consumers interacting with and using data-collecting devices. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Digital data, dataveillance, imaginaries, datafication, personalization
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business and IT
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-28671 (URN)10.1080/10253866.2022.2124977 (DOI)000855818500001 ()2-s2.0-85138775116 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Broman Foundation for Research and Entrepreneurship
Note

Forskningsfinansiär: Sparbanksstiftelsen Sjuhärad

Available from: 2022-09-28 Created: 2022-09-28 Last updated: 2024-01-18Bibliographically approved
Samsioe, E. & Fuentes, C. (2022). Digitalizing shopping routines: Re-organizing household practices to enable sustainable food provisioning. Sustainable Production and Consumption, 29, 807-819
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digitalizing shopping routines: Re-organizing household practices to enable sustainable food provisioning
2022 (English)In: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509, Vol. 29, p. 807-819Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

New digitally enabled modes of food provisioning are being developed. The aim of this paper is to examine, empirically illustrate, and conceptualize how and under what conditions these digital food platforms become routinized and what this means for the enabling of sustainable food consumption. Drawing on an ethnographically inspired study of three digital food provision platforms - i.e. meal box schemes, digitalized local food markets, and a food aggregator app – the paper explores how new digital food platforms are introduced and become routinized. The study shows that to create a shopping routine, specific combinations of meanings, materialities and competencies had to be interlinked and configured to enable the consistent reproduction of a shopping practice mode. Furthermore, the analysis also shows that there are multiple ways of carving out a space for new food shopping routines. The digital platforms studied and the modes of food shopping that they enabled were able to replace, complement or reconfigure already-established food shopping practices. Finally, the conclusions suggests that while these new modes of food provisioning became routinized, it was unlikely that they would remain so over time. Only a temporary stabilization was possible as built-in dynamics meant that the shopping routine was unable to last. This brings to the fore the challenges faced by those trying to promote new digitally enabled modes of sustainable food consumption. © 2021

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Digital platforms, Food consumption, Practice, Shopping routines, Sustainability, Cell proliferation, Box schemes, Local foods, Sustainable food consumption, Food supply
National Category
Business Administration Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Business and IT
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-27013 (URN)10.1016/j.spc.2021.07.019 (DOI)000788960900002 ()2-s2.0-85111665253 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Note

Cited By :1; Export Date: 10 December 2021; Article; Correspondence Address: Samsioe, E.; Department of Service Management and Service Studies, PO Box 882, Sweden; email: emma.samsioe@ism.lu.se

Available from: 2021-12-10 Created: 2021-12-10 Last updated: 2022-05-11
Fuentes, C. & Fuentes, M. (2022). Infrastructuring alternative markets: Enabling local food exchange through patchworking. Journal of Rural Studies, 94, 13-22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infrastructuring alternative markets: Enabling local food exchange through patchworking
2022 (English)In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 94, p. 13-22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to advance our understanding of the complex material arrangements involved in the formation of AFNs by applying the concept of market infrastructure and turning our attention to the process of infrastructuring. Based on an ethnographic study of REKO rings, a network of local food markets, we show how disparate elements, e.g. digital interfaces, parking locations, and Swish (an electronic payment system), are interconnected and configured to form the REKO ring market infrastructure patchwork – an infrastructure made by linking together previously unrelated elements and re-purposing them. We then demonstrate how this patchwork infrastructure enables the formation of market actors, coordination of the market actors’ activities, and the qualification and valuation of foods, thereby making the exchange of alternative food possible. Our analysis of infrastructure patchworking illustrates a different type of infrastructure-making resulting in a temporary and fragile infrastructure which, despite its instability, enables exchange. Drawing on this analysis we argue that the potential of AFNs to take form and impact contemporary modes of food provisioning cannot be understood without exploring the process of infrastructuring.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Alternative food networks, Infrastructure, Sociology of markets, Sustainability
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-28125 (URN)10.1016/j.jrurstud.2022.05.022 (DOI)000811503500002 ()2-s2.0-85131449931 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-06-27 Created: 2022-06-27 Last updated: 2022-11-16Bibliographically approved
Fuentes, C. & Sörum, N. (2022). Living with digital infrastructures: Shaping the data disclosure practices of consumers. In: : . Paper presented at Research Network of Sociology of Consumption European Sociological Association Midterm Conference, Oslo, Norway, August 31-September 3, 2022..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Living with digital infrastructures: Shaping the data disclosure practices of consumers
2022 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Keywords
consumer privacy, data practices, digital retail, market infrastructure
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business and IT
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-30363 (URN)
Conference
Research Network of Sociology of Consumption European Sociological Association Midterm Conference, Oslo, Norway, August 31-September 3, 2022.
Available from: 2023-08-22 Created: 2023-08-22 Last updated: 2024-01-18Bibliographically approved
Fuentes, C., Samsioe, E. & Östrup Backe, J. (2022). Online food shopping reinvented: developing digitally enabled coping strategies in times of crisis. International Review of Retail Distribution & Consumer Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Online food shopping reinvented: developing digitally enabled coping strategies in times of crisis
2022 (English)In: International Review of Retail Distribution & Consumer Research, ISSN 0959-3969, E-ISSN 1466-4402Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The COVID-19 pandemic has greatly impacted consumer food shopping. This paper aims to conceptualise, illustrate and explain how and why online grocery shopping has changed during the pandemic. Taking a shopping-as-practice approach and drawing on ethnographic interviews with 31 Swedish households, we analyse how online grocery shopping was performed during the pandemic. Our findings show that online grocery shopping was reinvented during the pandemic, it was no longer only a convenient mode of shopping, but became also a way to cope with the crisis brought about by Covid-19. This change, however, was demanding as developing and routinizing a new mode of shopping practice required substantial work on the part of consumers. Consumers had to engage in detailed planning, to learn to shop anew, and to develop temporal sensitivity. By developing this new mode of online grocery shopping consumers were able to cope, both practically and emotionally, with the challenges brought on by the restrictions. This study provides insights into consumers’ capacities to manage a food crisis, showing that this capacity depends on both retailers’ digital food platforms as well as consumers’ pre-existing shopping competencies and social networks. We conclude by discussing both the managerial and societal implications of these results.

Keywords
shopping, food, practice, digital platforms, covid-19
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-27640 (URN)10.1080/09593969.2022.2047758 (DOI)000768718800001 ()2-s2.0-85126705085 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-03-15 Created: 2022-03-15 Last updated: 2022-03-31Bibliographically approved
Fuentes, C. & Samsioe, E. (2021). Devising food consumption: Complex households and the socio-material work of meal box schemes. Consumption, markets & culture, 24(5), 492-511
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Devising food consumption: Complex households and the socio-material work of meal box schemes
2021 (English)In: Consumption, markets & culture, ISSN 1025-3866, E-ISSN 1477-223X, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 492-511Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business and IT
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-23757 (URN)10.1080/10253866.2020.1810027 (DOI)000564102200001 ()2-s2.0-85089970992 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-09-09 Created: 2020-09-09 Last updated: 2022-01-19Bibliographically approved
Fuentes, C., Cegrell, O. & Vesterinen, J. (2021). Digitally enabling sustainable food shopping: App glitches, practice conflicts, and digital failure. Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, 61
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digitally enabling sustainable food shopping: App glitches, practice conflicts, and digital failure
2021 (English)In: Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, ISSN 0969-6989, E-ISSN 1873-1384, Vol. 61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

New digital food platforms are being launched accompanied with the promise of also promoting more sustainable food consumption. However, despite some success, many of these efforts to digitally reconfigure consumers food practices fail. The aim of this paper is to empirically explore, conceptualize and explain such failures. Taking a practice theory approach, and drawing on a field experiment using the Karma app – an anti-food waste app – the paper shows that the inability of this app to promote a new way of acquiring food is due to glitches - app failures of different sorts - but also practice conflicts. Two types of practice conflicts, practice mismatch and practice competition, make the fostering of a new sustainable food provisioning practice difficult.

Keywords
Food shopping, Digital, Practice theory, Sustainable consumption, Food waste
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Business and IT
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-25295 (URN)10.1016/j.jretconser.2021.102546 (DOI)000663533500020 ()2-s2.0-85105253611 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-04-12 Created: 2021-04-12 Last updated: 2021-07-07
Fuentes, C., Balkow, J. & Wittrock, H. (2021). Mobile shopping from home: Digitalization and the reconfiguration of domestic retailscapes. In: : . Paper presented at The 7th Nordic Retail and Wholesale Conference (NRWC) Umeå, Sweden on the 9th–11th November 2021.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mobile shopping from home: Digitalization and the reconfiguration of domestic retailscapes
2021 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Mobile shopping is becoming an increasingly widespread phenomenon and an emerging field of research (Groß, 2015). While much of the early research in this field has been focused on understanding what affects the acceptance of technology for mobile shopping and intentions and attitudes driving mobile shopping, there is a growing body of work that sets out to understand how mobile shopping is carried out in practice and what this entails (for an overview of this field, see Fuentes & Svingstedt, 2017).

Studies within this activity-based stream of research show that consumers are using mobile phones to for example search for product information, check store availability, compare prices, and purchase products online (Spaid & Flint, 2014). Consumers are also using mobile phones to chat about products with friends, to check blogs on the go, and to coordinate their shopping trips with friends and family (Fuentes & Svingstedt, 2017). Mobile phones, it would seem, are both used as practical and social shopping tools, offering consumers a broad range of possibilities (Spaid & Flint, 2014). The use therefore of mobile phones is having significant impact on shopping. Some studies even indicate that as mobile phones are becoming increasingly integrated into shopping practices, they are reconfiguring the practice of shopping. 

While much can be said about what this means for the practice of shopping, one of the more significant changes is the temporal and spatial shift that comes as the result of the ubiquity of mobile phones. Because we carry these devices with us at all times (more or less) and because of the development of wifi and mobile internet, consumers today have access to retailscapes wherever and whenever they are. In addition to allowing consumers to shop on the go, as other studies have shown (Fuentes & Svingstedt, 2017), this also means that a considerable amount of shopping is today done digitally from home. Smartphones are central in this new home-shopping practice, enabling consumers access to multiple retail sites as well as a plethora of shopping tools (budget apps, shopping list apps) and third-party sites (such as price runner). While shopping from home has been possible ever since the advent of catalogue shopping, we propose that the introduction of the smartphone and other mobile digital devices is leading to the reconfiguration of mobile shopping from home, changing both how we shop at home but also how we approach and perform our homes. 

The aim of this paper is therefore to examine and explain how and under what conditions mobile phones are reconfiguring both the practice of mobile shopping from home and the spatialities and temporalities of the home. This is important both to understand the developing practice of mobile shopping but also to be able to comment on the impact that digitally enabled commercialization is having on consumers everyday lives. Theoretically we draw on the theoretical framework of practice theory and the geographically influenced concept of retailscape (Fuentes, Bäckström, & Svingstedt, 2017) to conceptualise home shopping as mode of practice both anchored in and capable of reconfiguring the spatial and temporal make-up of the home. 

Empirically, the analysis draws on an on-going ethnographically inspired study of home shopping consumers. Participants are asked to document their at-home mobile shopping using a research app, taking photos and writing comments, for a period of two weeks. They are then interviewed using the collected material but also going beyond it about their home shopping and how/when/where it is performed, what other practices it is connected to/inhibits and how this practice has developed over time. 

Preliminary results indicate that at home mobile shopping – defined in the broad sense to include – is a practice that has been increasing in intensity, particularly during the pandemic. While consumers approach and conduct mobile shopping from home in different ways, they all developed more or less routinized forms of mobile shopping. In establishing these new modes of shopping, the practices “carved out” space for themselves, being often conducted in specific home place – in the kitchen/by the fridge, in bed or the sofa – depending on the practice. Moreover, mobile shopping from home required that the practice be “wedged-in” between other practices. Temporal ordering and synchronizing with other practices were crucial for the reconfiguring effects that mobile shopping had on everyday lives. It was thus clear that mobile shopping from home was a practice that had to be actively worked into the nexus of everyday practices and what once in place it reconfigured by the spatial and temporal organisation of the home. 

This digitally enabled reconfiguration had both positive and negative outcomes for consumers. While mobile shopping from home often helped consumer juggle their busy lifestyles, they were also often worried that this practice was conducted at the expense of other social and work-related practices. Similarly, while mobile shopping from home made their home a more functional space, particularly so under the pandemic, it also connected their homes to multiple retailscapes, at times with perceived negative results. 

To conclude, while we do not claim homes had previously been free of commercial influence, on the contrary the home has a long history as a retailscape (see for example catalogue shopping and the phenomenon of TV-shop), mobile phones lead to the enactment of new domestic retailscapes. Both the mechanisms involved in this process and the outcome of it warrants scholarly attention.

National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business and IT
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-27026 (URN)
Conference
The 7th Nordic Retail and Wholesale Conference (NRWC) Umeå, Sweden on the 9th–11th November 2021
Available from: 2021-12-14 Created: 2021-12-14 Last updated: 2021-12-14Bibliographically approved
Fuentes, M. & Fuentes, C. (2021). Reconfiguring food materialities: plant-based food consumption practices in antagonistic landscapes. Food, Culture, and Society: an international journal of multidisciplinary research, 1-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reconfiguring food materialities: plant-based food consumption practices in antagonistic landscapes
2021 (English)In: Food, Culture, and Society: an international journal of multidisciplinary research, ISSN 1552-8014, E-ISSN 1751-7443, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to conceptualize and discuss how plant-based food consumption is accomplished in an environment pre-configured by meat-based food practices. Drawing on ethnographic interviews with thirteen consumers, and using a socio-material practice approach, the paper demonstrates how plant-based shopping, cooking and eating practices are enabled and shaped by material reconfigurations. The paper shows how developments such as an expanding range of plant-based food products, the increased use of social media, and the re-appropriation of shops and kitchens all entail the continuous reconfiguration of the materials involved in shopping, cooking and eating practices. Together, these material reconfigurations form a socio-material landscape that is mutable and changing, thus enabling plant-based food consumption. In addition, the paper also suggests that these material reconfigurations are not something that can be managed due to having evolved as a collective process in which multiple actors take part, all guided by their own interests. In doing so, the paper illustrates that, in order to understand plant-based consumption, as well as its emergence, performance, and complexities, we must take into account the practical and material aspects involved, not just the cultural or cognitive mechanisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2021
Keywords
Consumption, vegetarian, plant-based, practice theory, materiality
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business and IT
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-25421 (URN)10.1080/15528014.2021.1903716 (DOI)000641356000001 ()2-s2.0-85104753 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, 2017-01604
Available from: 2021-05-12 Created: 2021-05-12 Last updated: 2021-10-21Bibliographically approved
Fuentes, C. & Hedegård, L. (2021). Retailing and the re-qualification of goods: How second-hand products become valuable. In: : . Paper presented at The 7th Nordic Retail and Wholesale Conference (NRWC).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Retailing and the re-qualification of goods: How second-hand products become valuable
2021 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Sustainability has over the last decade attracted considerable attention from both practitioners and scholars. There are now numerous efforts by companies to source, market and sell more sustainable products in more sustainable ways. There is also now an emergent body of work that addresses sustainability issues within retail (Wiese et al. 2012; Ruiz-Real et al. 2019). However, while this field of practice and research has come a long way, it remains to a great extent delimited to the practice and study of conventional forms of sustainable retailing. Research on issues such as on the impact that signage, eco-labels, and in-store marketing can play (Jones et al. 2005b; Guyader et al. 2017), discussions on the importance of product range (Sadowski and Buckingham, 2007), or analysis of how the work of the staff can promote the purchase of more sustainable products (Fuentes and Fredriksson, 2016) dominate the field. While this work has played an important role by drawing attention to and examining these key sustainability efforts, it has tended to ignore more unconventional sustainability approaches. 

In this paper we want to address this paucity by exploring a relatively less conventional mode of sustainable retailing: the re-selling of previously discarded goods. While second hand retailing is not a new phenomenon in itself, the way second-hand retailing and shopping is framed and marketed has changed over time (Appelgren & Bohlin, 2015). From being a fringe and alternative phenomenon to acquiring a more mainstream position. Today we see not only the increase in trendy second-hand stores and the new digital platform for second-hand shopping, many conventional retailers are also including a second-hand line or reselling their own products along-side new lines of products. Second-hand is becoming increasingly mainstreamed (Kant Hvass, 2016). This move has also been accompanied by an increasing adoption of conventional marketing practices and goals (Broadbridge & Parsons, 2003). New ways of displaying, thematizing, and pricing second hand products have emerged. And yet little research has been done to understand these new second-hand retail landscapes. While there is an impressive body of work examining the why and how of second-hand consumption, few studies look closer at the marketing work involved in making previously discarded goods valuable again. It is this paucity that we set out to address.

Against this background, our aim is to explore how and under what condition second hand products are transformed from discarded and devalued goods to valuable exchangeable products. 

To accomplish this, we draw on the conceptual toolbox of constructivist market studies and in particular the concept of qualification. Very briefly, qualification is the simultaneously determining and enacting of the qualities of products (Dubuisson-Quellier, 2010). From this perspective the qualities of goods are not given but instead actively constructed. Or, phrased differently, “the outcome of an active production involving the identification and valuation of good and consumer’s qualities” (Ariztia, 2013, p. 147). Studies have shown that the process of qualification is complex and commonly involves multiple actors and devices: including advertising agencies, sales clerks, social media, packaging and stores can all play key roles in the qualification of goods (Fuentes & Fuentes, 2017). In what follows we will make use of this approach to analyse and show how a series of interlinked practices lead to the re-qualification of second-hand goods using various registers. 

Empirically, the analysis draws on an ongoing ethnographic study of ReTuna, a shopping mall based on reuse located in Eskilstuna, Sweden. ReTuna was established in 2015 and is run by a municipality owned waste- and energy company. The owner’s goals are to create profit while also reducing the amount of incinerated waste and increasing the awareness of sustainable consumption. To fulfill these goals, ReTuna collects donated goods and distributes them to its tenants, who process and re-sell them. While ReTuna sells recirculated goods, it aims to be a traditional mall, with individual outlets, pop-up stores, and a café that offers lunch and snacks. The mall’s total area is 5,000 square meters distributed over two floors. On average, 400 visitors dispose of goods at the waste recycling station and 750 people visit the mall each day. 

The study makes use of ethnographic methods (Peñaloza 1998; Czarniawska 2007), combining in situ semi-structured interviews and observations at ReTuna. In total, 49 interviews with mall management, store owners/managers, store staff, collection and sorting staff and, other people involved in organizing the mall have been carried out. Three types of observations have been conducted, i.e., six overall mall observations (7,5 hours in total), 26 in-store (participant) observations (64 hours in total), and six (participant) observations in the collection and sorting center (35 hours in total). 

Preliminary results indicate that a set of interlinked practices are involved in the re-qualification of goods at the Re-Tuna mall. Goods go from devalued to be become valued again through a re-qualification processes involving the 1) selecting (valuing goods and selected which of the donated goods to sell and which to discard), 2) material re-making (including the cleaning, washing and steaming of second-hand goods, the refurbishment and renovation of second-hand goods to restore goods’ original function but also the redesign of goods), 3) displaying and 4) servicing of second-hand goods. We will show how second-hand goods are through these series of interlinked practices re-qualified – gaining new qualities that make them valuable to consumers – and under what conditions this process of re-qualification is possible. 

The paper contributes to the discussion on marketing in second-hand retail (McColl et al. 2013; Kamleitner et al. 2019; Kim et al. 2021) by discussing successful and failed re-qualification activities of second-hand goods. By learning from practical attempts, it is possible to advance the understanding of how contextual framing (marketing activities) must be interlinked with innovative use of material qualities in re-qualification processes. Practical implications involve a developed understanding of re-qualification activities that can be used by (second-hand) retailers in enhancing product and business development strategies.  

Keywords
Sustainability in retail,  Second hand consumption, Marketing, Ethnography, Valuing
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-26921 (URN)
Conference
The 7th Nordic Retail and Wholesale Conference (NRWC)
Available from: 2021-11-19 Created: 2021-11-19 Last updated: 2021-12-01Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6687-274x

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