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Haider, Jutta
Publications (10 of 119) Show all publications
Haider, J., Sundin, O. & Andersson Schwarz, J. (2019). Algoritmernas roll i plattformssamhället. In: Plattformssamhället: (pp. 90-113). Stockholm: Fores
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Algoritmernas roll i plattformssamhället
2019 (English)In: Plattformssamhället, Stockholm: Fores , 2019, p. 90-113Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Fores, 2019
Keywords
algoritmer
National Category
Information Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22701 (URN)
Available from: 2020-05-04 Created: 2020-05-04 Last updated: 2020-05-04Bibliographically approved
Haider, J. & Sundin, O. (2019). How Do you Trust?. In: Understanding Media and Information Literacy (MIL) in the Digital Age: . Göteborg: University of Gothenburg and UNESCO
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Do you Trust?
2019 (English)In: Understanding Media and Information Literacy (MIL) in the Digital Age, Göteborg: University of Gothenburg and UNESCO , 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The chapter focuses on the notion of critical evaluation of information, which is an important part of media and information literacy (MIL). The concepts frictions of relevance and infrastructural meaningmaking are introduced to shed light on the information infrastructure’s significance for MIL in today’s digital media ecology. Furthermore, the chapter discusses some of the limitations inherent in placing theresponsibility for evaluating information predominantly on the individual, thus challenging the straightforward connection between MIL and democracy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: University of Gothenburg and UNESCO, 2019
Keywords
infrastructure, trust, information evaluation, search engines, algorithms, relevance
National Category
Information Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22700 (URN)
Available from: 2020-05-04 Created: 2020-05-04 Last updated: 2020-05-04Bibliographically approved
Haider, J. & Sundin, O. (2019). How do you trust? On infrastructural meaning-making and the need for self reflection.. In: Ulla Carlsson (Ed.), Understanding Media and Information Literacy (MIL) in the Digital Age.: A question of Democracy - A question of Democracy (pp. 107-112). Gothenburg: University of Gothenburg and UNESCO
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How do you trust? On infrastructural meaning-making and the need for self reflection.
2019 (English)In: Understanding Media and Information Literacy (MIL) in the Digital Age.: A question of Democracy - A question of Democracy / [ed] Ulla Carlsson, Gothenburg: University of Gothenburg and UNESCO , 2019, p. 107-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The chapter focuses on the notion of critical evaluation of information, which is an important part of media and information literacy (MIL). The concepts frictions of relevance and infrastructural meaningmaking are introduced to shed light on the information infrastructure’s significance for MIL in today’s digital media ecology. Furthermore, the chapter discusses some of the limitations inherent in placing theresponsibility for evaluating information predominantly on the individual, thus challenging the straightforward connection between MIL and democracy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Gothenburg: University of Gothenburg and UNESCO, 2019
Series
JMGs bokserie ; 79
Keywords
information literacy, infrastructure, misinformation, search engines
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22593 (URN)978-91-88212-87-0 (ISBN)978-91-88212-89-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-01-18 Created: 2020-01-18 Last updated: 2020-04-23Bibliographically approved
Haider, J. & Sundin, O. (2019). Invisible Search and Online Search Engines. London & New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Invisible Search and Online Search Engines
2019 (English)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This book is concerned with how search, searching and with them search engines have become so widely used that we have stopped noticing them. One of society’s key infrastructure for knowing and getting informed are computerised systems supporting the search for and locating of documents and information. The use of these systems, search engines, is curiously dispersed and centralised at the same time. It is dispersed across a vast array of social practices in which it has acquired close to naturalised positions and it is commercially and technically centralised and controlled by a handful very dominant companies, especially one extremely powerful global player, Google. Looking for mediated information is mostly done online and arbitrated by the various tools and devices that people carry with them on a daily basis. In addition, various algorithms and not least economic interests organise search. This way search engines contribute to structuring private as much as professional lives and public and personal memories in ways that might not be immediately obvious. Yet, what does that mean more specifically? How do people deal with search engines? How do we research their use and which strands of previous research help us understand this all-encompassing, increasingly invisible information infrastructure? In this book we encounter original research on the use of search engines in contemporary everyday life and the challenges they pose for media- and information literacy, together with reflections on previous research from fields such as library and information science, media studies and STS. By doing this the authors also reclaim the study of search for library and information science. They tap into the discipline’s multifaceted tradition of research in information retrieval, information seeking and information behaviour and highlight its significant contributions to understanding and researching search in contemporary society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London & New York: Routledge, 2019
Series
The ubiquity of search in everyday life
Keywords
search, search engines, everyday life
National Category
Information Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22702 (URN)10.4324/9780429448546 (DOI)9781138328617 (ISBN)
Note

Book

Available from: 2020-05-04 Created: 2020-05-04 Last updated: 2020-05-04Bibliographically approved
Haider, J. & Sundin, O. (2019). Invisible search and online search engines. The ubiquity of search in everyday life.. London & New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Invisible search and online search engines. The ubiquity of search in everyday life.
2019 (English)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Invisible Search and Online Search Engines considers the use of search engines in contemporary everyday life and the challenges this poses for media and information literacy. Looking for mediated information is mostly done online and arbitrated by the various tools and devices that people carry with them on a daily basis. Because of this, search engines have a significant impact on the structure of our lives, and personal and public memories. Haider and Sundin consider what this means for society, whilst also uniting research on information retrieval with research on how people actually look for and encounter information. Search engines are now one of society’s key infrastructures for knowing and becoming informed. While their use is dispersed across myriads of social practices, where they have acquired close to naturalised positions, they are commercially and technically centralised. Arguing that search, searching, and search engines have become so widely used that we have stopped noticing them, Haider and Sundin consider what it means to be so reliant on this all-encompassing and increasingly invisible information infrastructure. Invisible Search and Online Search Engines is the first book to approach search and search engines from a perspective that combines insights from the technical expertise of information science research with a social science and humanities approach. As such, the book should be essential reading for academics, researchers, and students working on and studying information science, library and information science (LIS), media studies, journalism, digital cultures, and educational sciences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London & New York: Routledge, 2019
National Category
Information Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22575 (URN)9781138328617 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-01-17 Created: 2020-01-17 Last updated: 2020-01-24Bibliographically approved
Haider, J. & Sundin, O. (2019). Invisible search and online search engines. The ubiquity of search in everyday life. London & New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Invisible search and online search engines. The ubiquity of search in everyday life
2019 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Invisible Search and Online Search Engines considers the use of search engines in contemporary everyday life and the challenges this poses for media and information literacy. Looking for mediated information is mostly done online and arbitrated by the various tools and devices that people carry with them on a daily basis. Because of this, search engines have a significant impact on the structure of our lives, and personal and public memories. Haider and Sundin consider what this means for society, whilst also uniting research on information retrieval with research on how people actually look for and encounter information. Search engines are now one of society’s key infrastructures for knowing and becoming informed. While their use is dispersed across myriads of social practices, where they have acquired close to naturalised positions, they are commercially and technically centralised. Arguing that search, searching, and search engines have become so widely used that we have stopped noticing them, Haider and Sundin consider what it means to be so reliant on this all-encompassing and increasingly invisible information infrastructure. Invisible Search and Online Search Engines is the first book to approach search and search engines from a perspective that combines insights from the technical expertise of information science research with a social science and humanities approach. As such, the book should be essential reading for academics, researchers, and students working on and studying information science, library and information science (LIS), media studies, journalism, digital cultures, and educational sciences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London & New York: Routledge, 2019
National Category
Information Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22538 (URN)9781138328617 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-04-23 Created: 2020-04-23 Last updated: 2020-04-29Bibliographically approved
Haider, J. & Sundin, O. (2019). Invisible search and online search engines. The ubiquity of search in everyday life.. London & New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Invisible search and online search engines. The ubiquity of search in everyday life.
2019 (English)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Invisible Search and Online Search Engines considers the use of search engines in contemporary everyday life and the challenges this poses for media and information literacy. Looking for mediated information is mostly done online and arbitrated by the various tools and devices that people carry with them on a daily basis. Because of this, search engines have a significant impact on the structure of our lives, and personal and public memories. Haider and Sundin consider what this means for society, whilst also uniting research on information retrieval with research on how people actually look for and encounter information. Search engines are now one of society’s key infrastructures for knowing and becoming informed. While their use is dispersed across myriads of social practices, where they have acquired close to naturalised positions, they are commercially and technically centralised. Arguing that search, searching, and search engines have become so widely used that we have stopped noticing them, Haider and Sundin consider what it means to be so reliant on this all-encompassing and increasingly invisible information infrastructure. Invisible Search and Online Search Engines is the first book to approach search and search engines from a perspective that combines insights from the technical expertise of information science research with a social science and humanities approach. As such, the book should be essential reading for academics, researchers, and students working on and studying information science, library and information science (LIS), media studies, journalism, digital cultures, and educational sciences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London & New York: Routledge, 2019
National Category
Information Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22550 (URN)9781138328617 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-04-27 Created: 2020-04-27 Last updated: 2020-04-29Bibliographically approved
Sundin, O. & Haider, J. (2019). Källtillit i skolans undervisning. Skolverket
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Källtillit i skolans undervisning
2019 (English)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Skolverket, 2019
Keywords
källkritik, sökkritik, källtillit, grundskola, undervisning
National Category
Information Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22703 (URN)
Available from: 2020-05-04 Created: 2020-05-04 Last updated: 2020-05-04Bibliographically approved
Haider, J. & Sundin, O. (2019). The fragmentation of facts and infrastructural meaning-making. In: Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Conceptions of Library and Information Science, Ljubljana, Slovenia, June 16-19, 2019; Article; colis1923: . Paper presented at Tenth International Conference on Conceptions of Library and Information Science, Ljubljana, Slovenia, June 16-19, 2019. , 24(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The fragmentation of facts and infrastructural meaning-making
2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Conceptions of Library and Information Science, Ljubljana, Slovenia, June 16-19, 2019; Article; colis1923, 2019, Vol. 24, no 4Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction. This paper presents a theory-driven discussion on the role of facts in society, couched between a brief historical overview and a discussion of the contemporary situation, exemplified in particular by openly available web-based fact services. Implications for the conceptualisation of information literacy – and in particular information literacy in relation to today’s dominant algorithmic information infrastructure – are considered throughout.

Method. This is a conceptual paper where theoretical reasoning is accompanied by examples from a small empirical material. This material consists of the use and observation of three web-based fact services as well as expert interviews with three producers and one user of one of the services. In particular Hannah Arendt’s essay “Truth and politics” is drawn on to contextualise and understand the role of facts in society.

Results. The web-based fact services investigated here facilitate and describe the creation of facts based on open data in a rather traditional way, i.e. by providing references and pointing to sources. However, the established facts are then inserted into today’s networked information landscape, which is an arena for competing knowledge claims working according to the market’s principles of popularity, and this leads to conflicting situations and poses new demands on information literacy.

Conclusions. This paper suggests the need for a view of information literacy that accounts for infrastructural meaning-making at the same time as it enables the political dimensions of the way in which facts and factual information are created and valued in contemporary society to be taken seriously.

Keywords
information literacy, facts
National Category
Information Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22704 (URN)
Conference
Tenth International Conference on Conceptions of Library and Information Science, Ljubljana, Slovenia, June 16-19, 2019
Available from: 2020-05-04 Created: 2020-05-04 Last updated: 2020-06-01Bibliographically approved
Haider, J. & Sundin, O. (2019). The fragmentation of facts and infrastructural meaning-making: New demands on information literacy. Paper presented at Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Conceptions of Library and Information Science, Ljubljana, Slovenia, June 16-19, 2019. Information research, 24(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The fragmentation of facts and infrastructural meaning-making: New demands on information literacy
2019 (English)In: Information research, ISSN 1368-1613, E-ISSN 1368-1613, Vol. 24, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents a theory-driven discussion on the role of facts in society, couched between a brief historical overview and a discussion of the contemporary situation, exemplified in particular by openly available web-based fact services. Implications for the conceptualisation of information literacy – and in particular information literacy in relation to today’s dominant algorithmic information infrastructure – are considered throughout. Method. This is a conceptual paper where theoretical reasoning is accompanied by examples from a small empirical material. This material consists of the use and observation of three web-based fact services as well as expert interviews with three producers and one user of one of the services. In particular Hannah Arendt’s essay “Truth and politics” is drawn on to contextualise and understand the role of facts in society. Results. The web-based fact services investigated here facilitate and describe the creation of facts based on open data in a rather traditional way, i.e. by providing references and pointing to sources. However, the established facts are then inserted into today’s networked information landscape, which is an arena for competing knowledge claims working according to the market’s principles of popularity, and this leads to conflicting situations and poses new demands on information literacy. **Conclusions.**This paper suggests the need for a view of information literacy that accounts for infrastructural meaning-making at the same time as it enables the political dimensions of the way in which facts and factual information are created and valued in contemporary society to be taken seriously.

Keywords
information literacy, facts, infrastructure
National Category
Information Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22592 (URN)
Conference
Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Conceptions of Library and Information Science, Ljubljana, Slovenia, June 16-19, 2019
Available from: 2020-01-18 Created: 2020-01-18 Last updated: 2020-03-04Bibliographically approved

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