Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Gabre, Marita, Ass professorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7777-2672
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Gabre, M., Wireklint Sundström, B. & Olausson, S. (2018). 'A little good with the bad': Newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients' perspectives onself-care: A phenomenological approach. Nordic journal of nursing research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'A little good with the bad': Newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients' perspectives onself-care: A phenomenological approach
2018 (English)In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increased knowledge is needed about what self-care means from the patients’ perspective, especially since the patient population with type 2 diabetes has been rising. The aim was to describe self-care, as experienced by patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. This study adopted a phenomenological approach. Eight patients were interviewed. A combination of photos and interviews were used. The essential meaning of self-care was found to be an existential struggle that evokes feelings of being in-between one’s old unhealthy life and a new healthier one. In this in-between condition, tension exits between contradictorily emotions of anxiety, hopelessness and hope. This struggle also means questioning one’s identity. It is important that diabetes nurses create an opening for reflection and dare to challenge their patients to reflect on this existential struggle.

Keywords
lived experiences, newly diagnosed, phenomenology, reflective lifeworld research, self-care, type 2 diabetes
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14344 (URN)10.1177/2057158518775319 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-06-19 Created: 2018-06-19 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Andersson, H., Gabre, M., Dehre, A., Andersson Hagiwara, M. & Maurin Söderholm, H. (2018). Simulation in Virtual World to Promote Communication. In: Pre-hospital care- Education and training of ambulance professionals: . Paper presented at 3rd Global Conference on Emergency Nursing and Trauma Care, Leeuwenhorst, 4-6 October, 2018.. Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulation in Virtual World to Promote Communication
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Pre-hospital care- Education and training of ambulance professionals, Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands, 2018Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction

Communication between ambulance professionals and patients is essential for understanding the patient's lifeworld (Wireklint Sundström & Dahlberg 2010). Simultaneously, communication is challenging to teach and learn within the framework of specific courses. However, simulation in virtual worlds can support the development of new skills such as communication (Combs, Sokolowski & Banks 2016).

 

Aim

The aim of this work was to design a simulation-based platform for communication training among ambulance nurse students (ANS).

 

Methods

A qualitative action research approach was used (Coghlan & Casey 2001). Second Life® (SL) was selected since it was an existing virtual world. SL is a web-based flexible three-dimensional platform that allows customization. Interaction and communication with other virtual people can be done through avatars in real time (Hodge, Collins & Giordano 2011). Three ANS and five teachers participated, none of the participants had prior experience of SL. Observations and interviews were used as data and analysed using thematic analysis.

 

Results

The participants’ experiences generated three themes:

 

Understanding the virtual world

It was easy to interact and communicate with other virtual people. However, it took time to feel comfortable to navigate in SL.

 

Technological challenges

One challenge was related to audio-visual problems e.g. not compatible headset, interfering echoes and that the image was distorted at times, which made it difficult to act and move the avatar. Another challenge was associated with the 3D modelling e.g. the capability to use of coordinates, positioning, object dimensioning and the fact that accidental deletions could not be restored. A third challenges that influenced the communication was the difficulty of visualizing clinically relevant care measures such as diagnostic examinations or drug treatment. Finally, there was a challenge to customize the avatars to look like ambulance professionals or a severely ill patient.

 

Learning through avatars

Learning through avatars requires that the participants take responsibility for delivering a convincing performance.  Immersion was limited since actions do not take place from a first-person viewpoint. There is a need that the scenario is based on realistic conditions e.g. interiors, equipment, clothing, avatar appearance and behaviour.

 

Conclusion

The present system is not suitable for training of medical assessment. Teachers who are considering using virtual worlds in the training for future ambulance professionals should note that an appropriate design is crucial for how the simulation is experienced.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands: , 2018
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15170 (URN)
Conference
3rd Global Conference on Emergency Nursing and Trauma Care, Leeuwenhorst, 4-6 October, 2018.
Available from: 2018-10-07 Created: 2018-10-07 Last updated: 2018-10-09Bibliographically approved
Andersson, H., Gabre, M., Dehre, A., Andersson Hagiwara, M. & Maurin Söderholm, H. (2018). Simulation in Virtual World to Promote Communication. In: Pre-hospital care- Education and training of ambulance professionals: . Paper presented at 3rd Global Conference on Emergency Nursing and Trauma Care, Leeuwenhorst, 4-6 October 2018. Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulation in Virtual World to Promote Communication
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Pre-hospital care- Education and training of ambulance professionals, Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands, 2018Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction

Communication between ambulance professionals and patients is essential for understanding the patient's lifeworld (Wireklint Sundström & Dahlberg 2010). Simultaneously, communication is challenging to teach and learn within the framework of specific courses. However, simulation in virtual worlds can support the development of new skills such as communication (Combs, Sokolowski & Banks 2016).

 

Aim

The aim of this work was to design a simulation-based platform for communication training among ambulance nurse students (ANS).

 

Methods

A qualitative action research approach was used (Coghlan & Casey 2001). Second Life® (SL) was selected since it was an existing virtual world. SL is a web-based flexible three-dimensional platform that allows customization. Interaction and communication with other virtual people can be done through avatars in real time (Hodge, Collins & Giordano 2011). Three ANS and five teachers participated, none of the participants had prior experience of SL. Observations and interviews were used as data and analysed using thematic analysis.

 

Results

The participants’ experiences generated three themes:

 

Understanding the virtual world

It was easy to interact and communicate with other virtual people. However, it took time to feel comfortable to navigate in SL.

 

Technological challenges

One challenge was related to audio-visual problems e.g. not compatible headset, interfering echoes and that the image was distorted at times, which made it difficult to act and move the avatar. Another challenge was associated with the 3D modelling e.g. the capability to use of coordinates, positioning, object dimensioning and the fact that accidental deletions could not be restored. A third challenges that influenced the communication was the difficulty of visualizing clinically relevant care measures such as diagnostic examinations or drug treatment. Finally, there was a challenge to customize the avatars to look like ambulance professionals or a severely ill patient.

 

Learning through avatars

Learning through avatars requires that the participants take responsibility for delivering a convincing performance.  Immersion was limited since actions do not take place from a first-person viewpoint. There is a need that the scenario is based on realistic conditions e.g. interiors, equipment, clothing, avatar appearance and behaviour.

 

Conclusion

The present system is not suitable for training of medical assessment. Teachers who are considering using virtual worlds in the training for future ambulance professionals should note that an appropriate design is crucial for how the simulation is experienced.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands: , 2018
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15171 (URN)
Conference
3rd Global Conference on Emergency Nursing and Trauma Care, Leeuwenhorst, 4-6 October 2018
Available from: 2018-10-07 Created: 2018-10-07 Last updated: 2018-10-17Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7777-2672

Search in DiVA

Show all publications