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Keune, Svenja, Research Associate
Biography [eng]

Svenja Keune holds a Bachelor and Master degree in textile design from the University of Applied Sciences in Hamburg, Germany. She is passionate about textiles as a mediator between different media, materials, spaces and species. After creating emotional dialogues with textile surfaces using electronics, she now explores the potential of seeds as dynamic material and built a house to live with her experiments. She is currently finalising her PhD within the ArcInTex European Training Network, a research project funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant which connects architecture, interaction design and textiles to strengthen the foundations of design for more sustainable forms of living. As an industrial PhD student she is positioned at Svensson AB.

Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
(2019). Living in a Prototype: A Research Diary.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Living in a Prototype: A Research Diary
2019 (English)Artistic output (Unrefereed)
Publisher
p. 183
Keywords
Autobiographical research, Tiny House on Wheels, Sustainable living, Textiles as Mediators
National Category
Arts
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21963 (URN)
Projects
Textile FarmingArcInTexETN
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 642328
Available from: 2019-11-07 Created: 2019-11-07 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved
Keune, S. (2019). On Textile Farming: Living Indoors. (Doctoral dissertation). Borås: Högskolan i Borås
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On Textile Farming: Living Indoors
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Horticultural practices are increasingly entering the private realm due to the popularity of urban gardening, indoor gardening systems, and architectural propositions to join living spaces for people and vegetable cultivation in order to promote more resilient and sustainable ways of living. While new research into symbiotic processes between living organisms and their ability to sense and reason triggers new works of art, culture, design, and architecture, the organisation of indoor plants remains mainly unaffected. This is due to the fact that many of the examples that aim to bring together people and plants in an architectural context are characterised by rigid materials and technical systems that separate people and plants from each other and feature relatively unnatural environments, compositions, and expressions. In proposing an alternative perspective on this, On Textile Farming explores textiles as flexible systems for integrating plant growth in textile materials. The collaboration with AB Ludvig Svensson, a developer and producer of textiles for interiors and greenhouses, involved a joint approach to the two distinct areas of climate screens and interior textiles. Through experimental methods, interactions between plants and textiles were explored using double-weave structures to integrate seeds and substrate. A methodological framework is proposed wherein the processes and materials of textile and spatial design open up for environmental parameters, e.g. changes in time, climate, and material behaviour. The design concepts ‘textile permeability’, ‘seasonal textiles’, and ‘textile climate’ describe the interactions between plants, textiles, and space, and can be seen as first steps towards an interior textile ecosystem in which spaces are composed of relationships between biotic and abiotic components, causing the natural and the artificial to intersect. ‘Spatial permeability’, ‘seasonal interiors’ and ‘spatial climates’ expand the three textile concepts towards space and describe interactions between different spatial qualities that were explored through autobiographical research; for this, an experimental house was built in a rural region of Sweden and lived in. In this context, textiles be-came flexible interfaces between the inside and the outside, guiding growth and melting into seasonal expressions that blurred nature and artifice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Borås: Högskolan i Borås, 2019
Series
University of Borås studies in artistic research ; 31
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21880 (URN)978-91-88838-58-2 (ISBN)978-91-88838-59-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2019-12-02, T154, Textile Fashion Center, Skaraborgvägen 3, Borås, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Available from: 2019-11-08 Created: 2019-10-23 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved
Keune, S. (2019). On Textile Farming: The Interior as an Ecosystem. In: : . Paper presented at Textile Intersections. London
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On Textile Farming: The Interior as an Ecosystem
2019 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

Alongside with smart materials, biomaterials become increasingly available to the field of textile design. This biological paradigm brings an alternative perspective to the ways in which textiles can be designed, present themselves, and can be dealt with. As biomaterials such as plants and bacteria thrive in symbiosis with their environment, their ecosystem consequently becomes disposable to the expressions of textiles and interior spaces. Here, textiles could take on the role of a mediator for ecosystem services, e.g. guiding the growth of crops, regulating indoor climates and supporting the decomposition of waste. This research aims to explore what the design of a ‘textile interior ecosystem’ would be like and discusses what the role of textiles as accommodating biological processes in relation to this system could be. By experimental research, ‘On Textile Farming’ explores the design of ‘textile interior ecosystem’ investigating e.g. growing crops, composting and fermenting in interior spaces in order to speculate how these biological principles could be translated into the design of textiles and how this would change the way we form interior spaces, live with them and understand them - as a community of living systems. By embedding biological agents e.g. plants and bacteria into interior fabrics, a biological perspective is added to their life-cycle. Here, the role of the textile is opened up towards a substrate for biological agents, a template for growth and a mediator in between all actors involved in the ‘textile interior ecosystem’. As a result, this research presents speculative scenarios which exemplify the extended life-cycle, illustrate the increase in interior diversity and forms of habitation using textiles, from an aesthetic and functional point of view. In a time in which the way we handle relationships to biotic and abiotic components is discussed and criticised, ‘On Textile Farming’ could open up a range of concepts unfamiliar to designing textiles and spaces, such as ‘Seasonal Interiors’, ’Multispecies Interplay’ and ‘Textile Hortitecture’.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: , 2019
Keywords
Textile design, Biomaterials, Spatial design, Ecosystem, Textile life-cycle
National Category
Arts
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21961 (URN)10.17028/rd.lboro.9724718.v1 (DOI)
Conference
Textile Intersections
Projects
Textile FarmingArcInTexETN
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 642328
Available from: 2019-11-07 Created: 2019-11-07 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved
Keune, S. (2018). On Textile Farming. In: : . Paper presented at The Swedish Research Council's annual symposium on artistic research 2018, Piteå, 14-15 november, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On Textile Farming
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
autobiographic research, artistic research, h2020, sustainable forms of living, indoor gardening, textiles as mediators
National Category
Design
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15767 (URN)
Conference
The Swedish Research Council's annual symposium on artistic research 2018, Piteå, 14-15 november, 2018
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 642328
Available from: 2019-02-18 Created: 2019-02-18 Last updated: 2019-02-18Bibliographically approved
Keune, S. (2018). On Textile Farming: Seeds as Material for Textile Design. (Licentiate dissertation). Högskolan i Borås
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On Textile Farming: Seeds as Material for Textile Design
2018 (English)Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Presently, designing with living systems such as insects, fungi and bacteria has become an area of extended interest, proposing collaborative processes of designing and manufacturing - as a solution for symbiotic ways of living. On the scale of the interior, modern systems for interior gardening, combining both functional, e.g., food supply, purifying the air, and aesthetic values, experience exceptional popularity, ensuring a complementary perspective on horticultural landscapes indoors. As a result, the spaces where people live and crops grow increasingly intersect and therefore open

up for developments that bridge both areas and where aesthetic perspectives become equally important. However, modern indoor gardening systems are shaped by commercial horticultural practices, bringing reservoirs such as buckets, tubs or tanks, mostly built of plastic, into the homes. Textile Farming aims to explore alternative forms of plant organisation by blending seeds and textile structures into a hybrid material for textile interior scenarios. Consequently the materials’ performative capacity becomes part of the textile design process. A foundational part are forms of human management, e.g. activation of the seeds, maintenance of the plants, interaction with the hybrid textile structures within and beyond interiors, that leads to experiences and expressions. By practice based design research and through a series of design examples that explore the transformative potential of seeds in textile structures, alternative forms of plant organisation and methods for the textile design process lead to scenarios that propose alternatives to how we live with and organise plants today.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Högskolan i Borås, 2018
Series
University of Borås studies in artistic research ; 25
National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13920 (URN)978-91-88269-92-8 (ISBN)
Supervisors
Projects
ArcInTexETN
Available from: 2018-03-27 Created: 2018-03-27 Last updated: 2018-03-28Bibliographically approved
Keune, S. (2018). Textiles as a template/substrate for domestic gardening. In: : . Paper presented at Light Space: textile illumination, KADK Auditorium A3, Philip de Langes Allé 10, 1435 København K, 14 september, 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Textiles as a template/substrate for domestic gardening
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Keywords
textiles as a substrate, biodesign, indoor gardening, autobiographic research, artistic research, textile farming
National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15766 (URN)
Conference
Light Space: textile illumination, KADK Auditorium A3, Philip de Langes Allé 10, 1435 København K, 14 september, 2018.
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 642328
Available from: 2019-02-18 Created: 2019-02-18 Last updated: 2019-02-18Bibliographically approved
Keune, S. (2017). Co–designing with plants.: Degrading as an overlooked potential for interior aesthetics based on textile structures.. In: Loredana Di Lucchio, Lorenzo Imbesi, Paul Atkinson (Ed.), The Design Journal.: An International Journal for All Aspects of Design. Paper presented at Design for Next: Proceedings of the 12th European Academy of Design Conference, Sapienza University of Rome, April 12-14, 2017 (pp. 4742-4744). 5 Howick Place, London, SW1P 1WG: Taylor & Francis Group, 20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Co–designing with plants.: Degrading as an overlooked potential for interior aesthetics based on textile structures.
2017 (English)In: The Design Journal.: An International Journal for All Aspects of Design / [ed] Loredana Di Lucchio, Lorenzo Imbesi, Paul Atkinson, 5 Howick Place, London, SW1P 1WG: Taylor & Francis Group, 2017, Vol. 20, p. 4742-4744Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This research explores the dynamic qualities of plant degradation in textile structures for interior and aims to develop alternative aesthetics, interactions, life–cycles and applications for living with plants by referring to outdoor expressions and experiences. A series of material explorations illustrates the potential of corn seeds in textile indoor applications, focusing on aesthetics and material properties of degradation to create an interplay of texture, structure, form and color. The hybrid textiles refer to Blaisse view on curtains as fluid atmospheres and second skin, challenging the static nature of architecture and reinforcing the dialogue between landscape and interior. Bringing aesthetics of decay into interior spaces not only challenges the nature of materials, it also invites to rethink the aesthetic and cultural bias towards natural processes in interior scenarios.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
5 Howick Place, London, SW1P 1WG: Taylor & Francis Group, 2017
Keywords
Interior Textiles, Degradation, Biodesign, Co–design, Seeds
National Category
Design
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15762 (URN)10.1080/14606925.2017.1352977 (DOI)978-1-138-09023-1 (ISBN)
Conference
Design for Next: Proceedings of the 12th European Academy of Design Conference, Sapienza University of Rome, April 12-14, 2017
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 642328
Available from: 2019-02-18 Created: 2019-02-18 Last updated: 2019-02-25Bibliographically approved
Femenías, P., Fridh, K., Zetterblom, M., Keune, S., Talman, R., Henrysson, E. & Mörk, K. (2017). Earthy textiles. Experiences from a joint Teaching Encounter between Textile Design and Architecture. In: Anne Louise Bang,Mette Mikkelsen, Anette Flinck (Ed.), Cumulus REDO Conference Proceedings Design School Kolding 30 May – 2 June 2017: . Paper presented at Cumulus REDO, Kolding, 30th May - 2nd June 2017 (pp. 236-251).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Earthy textiles. Experiences from a joint Teaching Encounter between Textile Design and Architecture
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Cumulus REDO Conference Proceedings Design School Kolding 30 May – 2 June 2017 / [ed] Anne Louise Bang,Mette Mikkelsen, Anette Flinck, 2017, p. 236-251Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

This paper presents experiences from a two-day teaching workshop where first year students in architecture meet with first year students in textile design for an assignment on building structures with textile, soil and plants designing for indoor gardening with the aim of inspiring for more sustainable lifestyles. The background is a research project on textile architecture with the objective of exploring this new field and to establish a platform for long-term collaboration between the disciplines of architecture and textile design. The paper addresses pedagogical challenges in the meeting between first-years students of different disciplines and traditions, but also in the meeting between research and undergraduate teaching. The students produced creative results but had difficulties in exploring the full complexity of the task. An evaluative discussion is based on observations, photo documentation, notes during group discussions, follow-up questionnaires among the students and reflections among involved researchers.

Keywords
textile design, architecture, indoor gardening, teaching workshop, bachelor students
National Category
Design Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12488 (URN)
Conference
Cumulus REDO, Kolding, 30th May - 2nd June 2017
Available from: 2017-08-23 Created: 2017-08-23 Last updated: 2017-10-23Bibliographically approved
(2017). Exhibition on on-going research, experimental work and prototypes in textile design from the Smart Textiles Design Lab at Techtextil 2017 in Frankfurt on 9-12th May 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exhibition on on-going research, experimental work and prototypes in textile design from the Smart Textiles Design Lab at Techtextil 2017 in Frankfurt on 9-12th May 2017
Show others...
2017 (English)Artistic output (Unrefereed)
National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12489 (URN)
Funder
VINNOVA
Available from: 2017-08-23 Created: 2017-08-23 Last updated: 2019-02-13Bibliographically approved
Keune, S. (2017). Growing textile hybrid structures: Using Plants for Dynamic Textile Transformation, an Approach Towards Biophilic Urbanism. In: Alberto T. Estévez (Ed.), : . Paper presented at 3rd International Conference of Biodigital Architecture and Genetics, ESARQ, Barcelona, June 7-9, 2017 (pp. 264-275). , 3
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Growing textile hybrid structures: Using Plants for Dynamic Textile Transformation, an Approach Towards Biophilic Urbanism
2017 (English)In: / [ed] Alberto T. Estévez, 2017, Vol. 3, p. 264-275Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper attempts to illustrate a „Material System“ that can exemplify a hybrid material behavior through a designed assembly of two categories of materials (biological and textile). The transformable system is achieved by natural dynamic transformations, using the potential of seeds for their passive and active, adaptive and responsive characteristics. The paper will showcase a series of experiments illustrating alternative forms of plant organization, human management and dynamic transformation in textile interior scenarios. The use of jacquard double weave structures on industrial machines allows a variety of patterns and constructions. Pocket weave is used in order to create enclosures capable of accommodating external elements such as seeds seamlessly. Activated by surrounding factors and forms of human management, the final prototypes, presented within an interior scenario, attempt to utilize the various behavioral properties, creating a non–tech responsive structure. Consequently, the research opens up the design space for climate responsive architectural structures where the responsive capacity is embedded in the structure of the material system itself. The paper aims to contribute to the future development of biophilic design and biodesign in the context of textile and interior design.

Keywords
hybrid textile structures, biophilic design, textile transformation, biodesign
National Category
Design
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15765 (URN)978-84-685-0368-4 (ISBN)
Conference
3rd International Conference of Biodigital Architecture and Genetics, ESARQ, Barcelona, June 7-9, 2017
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 642328
Available from: 2019-02-18 Created: 2019-02-18 Last updated: 2019-02-25Bibliographically approved
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