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Wainaina, S. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2023). Automation and artificial intelligence in filamentous fungi-based bioprocesses: A review. Bioresource Technology, 369, 128421-128421, Article ID 128421.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Automation and artificial intelligence in filamentous fungi-based bioprocesses: A review
2023 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 369, p. 128421-128421, article id 128421Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

By utilizing their powerful metabolic versatility, filamentous fungi can be utilized in bioprocesses aimed at achieving circular economy. With the current digital transformation within the biomanufacturing sector, the interest of automating fungi-based systems has intensified. The purpose of this paper was therefore to review the potentials connected to the use of automation and artificial intelligence in fungi-based systems. Automation is characterized by the substitution of manual tasks with mechanized tools. Artificial intelligence is, on the other hand, a domain within computer science that aims at designing tools and machines with the capacity to execute functions that would usually require human aptitude. Process flexibility, enhanced data reliability and increased productivity are some of the benefits of integrating automation and artificial intelligence in fungi-based bio-processes. One of the existing gaps that requires further investigation is the use of such data-based technologies in the production of food from fungi.

Keywords
Filamentous fungi, Machine learning, Smart sensors, Robotic systems, Process control
National Category
Other Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-29346 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2022.128421 (DOI)000902073900003 ()2-s2.0-85143508672 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-23 Created: 2023-01-23 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Chandolias, K., Pawar, S. S., Vu, H. D., Wainaina, S. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2023). Bio‑hydrogen and VFA production from steel mill gases using pure and mixed bacterial cultures. Bioresource Technology Reports, 23, Article ID 101544.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bio‑hydrogen and VFA production from steel mill gases using pure and mixed bacterial cultures
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2023 (English)In: Bioresource Technology Reports, ISSN 2589-014X, Vol. 23, article id 101544Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A major source of CO2 emissions is the flaring of steel mill gas. This work demonstrated the enrichment of carboxydotrophic bacteria for converting steel mill gas into volatile fatty acids and H2, via gas fermentation. Several combinations of pure and mixed anaerobic cultures were used as inoculum in 0.5-L reactors, operated at 30 and 60 °C. The process was then scaled up in a 4-L membrane bioreactor, operated for 20 days, at 48 °C. The results showed that the enriched microbiomes can oxidize CO completely to produce H2/H+ which is subsequently used to fix the CO2. At 30 °C, a mixture of acetate, isobutyrate and propionate was obtained while H2 and acetate were the main products at 60 °C. The highest CO conversion and H2 production rate observed in the membrane bioreactor were 29 and 28 mL/LR/h, respectively. The taxonomic diversity of the bacterial community increased and the dominant species was Pseudomonas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Gas fermentation, In-situ hydrogenation, Steel mill gas, Volatile fatty acids, Bacteria, Bioreactors, Carbon dioxide, Fermentation, Gas emissions, Hydrogen production, acetic acid, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, isobutyric acid, propionic acid, steel, volatile fatty acid, Bio-hydrogen, CO 2 emission, Gas fermentations, H2, Inocula, Mixed anaerobic cultures, Mixed bacterial culture, Scaled-up, Acetobacterium, Acetobacterium woodii, Article, bacterium culture, carbon balance, food waste, gas, inoculation, iron and steel industry, nonhuman, oxidation, reaction temperature
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-30246 (URN)10.1016/j.biteb.2023.101544 (DOI)2-s2.0-85164255804 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-15 Created: 2023-08-15 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Awasthi, M. K., Kumar, V., Hellwig, C., Wikandari, R., Harirchi, S., Sar, T., . . . Taherzadeh, M. J. (2023). Filamentous fungi for sustainable vegan food production systems within a circular economy: Present status and future prospects. Food Research International, 164, Article ID 112318.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Filamentous fungi for sustainable vegan food production systems within a circular economy: Present status and future prospects
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2023 (English)In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 164, article id 112318Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Filamentous fungi serve as potential candidates in the production of different value-added products. In the context of food, there are several advantages of using filamentous fungi for food. Among the main advantages is that the fungal biomass used food not only meets basic nutritional requirements but that it is also rich in protein, low in fat, and free of cholesterol. This speaks to the potential of filamentous fungi in the production of food that can substitute animal-derived protein sources such as meat. Moreover, life-cycle analyses and techno-economic analyses reveal that fungal proteins perform better than animal-derived proteins in terms of land use efficiency as well as global warming. The present article provides an overview of the potential of filamentous fungi as a source of food and food supplements. The commercialization potential as well as social, legal and safety issues of fungi-based food products are discussed.

Keywords
Filamentous fungi, Circular economy, Myco-based, Food products, Food supplement
National Category
Other Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-29197 (URN)10.1016/j.foodres.2022.112318 (DOI)000915625600001 ()2-s2.0-85144090400 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-10 Created: 2023-01-10 Last updated: 2023-02-06Bibliographically approved
Harirchi, S., Wainaina, S., Sar, T., Nojoumi, S. A., Parchami, M., Varjani, S., . . . Taherzadeh, M. J. (2022). Microbiological insights into anaerobic digestion for biogas, hydrogen or volatile fatty acids (VFAs): a review. Bioengineered, 13(3), 6521-6557
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microbiological insights into anaerobic digestion for biogas, hydrogen or volatile fatty acids (VFAs): a review
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2022 (English)In: Bioengineered, ISSN 2165-5979, E-ISSN 2165-5987, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 6521-6557Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the past decades, considerable attention has been directed toward anaerobic digestion (AD), which is an effective biological process for converting diverse organic wastes into biogas, volatile fatty acids (VFAs), biohydrogen, etc. The microbial bioprocessing takes part during AD is of substantial significance, and one of the crucial approaches for the deep and adequate understanding and manipulating it toward different products is process microbiology. Due to highly complexity of AD microbiome, it is critically important to study the involved microorganisms in AD. In recent years, in addition to traditional methods, novel molecular techniques and meta-omics approaches have been developed which provide accurate details about microbial communities involved AD. Better understanding of process microbiomes could guide us in identifying and controlling various factors in both improving the AD process and diverting metabolic pathway toward production of selective bio-products. This review covers various platforms of AD process that results in different final products from microbiological point of view. The review also highlights distinctive interactions occurring among microbial communities. Furthermore, assessment of these communities existing in the anaerobic digesters is discussed to provide more insights into their structure, dynamics, and metabolic pathways. Moreover, the important factors affecting microbial communities in each platform of AD are highlighted. Finally, the review provides some recent applications of AD for the production of novel bio-products and deals with challenges and future perspectives of AD. © 2022 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis Ltd., 2022
Keywords
Anaerobic digestion, artificial rumen, interspecies electron transfer, microbial communities, syntrophy, Wood-Ljungdahl pathway
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-27668 (URN)10.1080/21655979.2022.2035986 (DOI)000761728300001 ()2-s2.0-85125551597 (Scopus ID)
Note

The authors are grateful to the Swedish Innovation Agency (VINNOVA) and Swedish Research Council FORMAS for their financial support.

Available from: 2022-03-21 Created: 2022-03-21 Last updated: 2023-01-19Bibliographically approved
Pinheiro, V. E., Wainaina, S., Polizeli, M. D. & Sárvári Horváth, I. (2021). Anaerobic digestion of cornmeal: the effect of crude enzyme extract and co-digestion with cow manure. Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anaerobic digestion of cornmeal: the effect of crude enzyme extract and co-digestion with cow manure
2021 (English)In: Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining, ISSN 1932-104X, E-ISSN 1932-1031Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined the effect of a crude enzyme extract, containing mainly starch-degrading enzymes, on cornmeal (Zea mays) hydrolysis. This was followed by an investigation of the effect of enzymatic treatment for the anaerobic digestion of this biomass. Cornmeal and cow manure were also co-digested, and both batch and semi-continuous experiments were performed. The enzymatic pretreatment of cornmeal resulted in a yield of 65 ± 5% reducing sugars, with 1:10 w/v (grams of dry substrate per mililiters of enzyme extract) enzyme load at 45 °C for 48 h. There was an 8% enhancement of methane production observed during the batch assays, both when cornmeal hydrolysate was digested and when enzymes were added directly to the digester. Synergetic effects were found when co-digesting cornmeal and cow manure, leading to higher methane yield (280 NmL gVS–1) than that (200 NmL gVS–1) calculated based on the methane potential of the individual substrates. Regarding long-term effects, the laboratory-scale semi-continuous experiments also demonstrated that the co-digestion of cornmeal and cow manure (1:1 volatile solid (VS) basis) led to a stable process reaching an organic loading rate of 3 g VS L day–1 and achieving a daily methane production of 1280.12 ± 99.4 NmL CH4/day. However, when cornmeal was investigated in mono-digestion, and the enzyme extract was directly added during semi-continuous digestion of cornmeal, volatile fatty acid (VFA) accumulation was observed, leading to a decrease in pH, and no significant enhancement of the conversion into methane was observed. © 2021 Society of Chemical Industry and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2021 Society of Chemical Industry and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley and Sons Ltd, 2021
Keywords
anaerobic digestion, co-digestion, cornmeal, cow manure, enzymatic hydrolysis, Chemical industry, Fertilizers, Manures, Methane, Stability criteria, Substrates, Volatile fatty acids, Codigestion, Crude enzymes, Degrading enzymes, Enzymatic treatments, Methane production, Semi-continuous, Volatile solid, Zea mays
National Category
Bioenergy Chemical Engineering
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-26974 (URN)10.1002/bbb.2303 (DOI)000710190400001 ()2-s2.0-85117602713 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-12-02 Created: 2021-12-02 Last updated: 2022-09-14Bibliographically approved
Uwineza, C., Mahboubi, A., Atmowidjojo, A., Ramadhani, A., Wainaina, S., Millati, R., . . . Taherzadeh, M. J. (2021). Cultivation of edible filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae on volatile fatty acids derived from anaerobic digestion of food waste and cow manure. Bioresource Technology, 337, Article ID 125410.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cultivation of edible filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae on volatile fatty acids derived from anaerobic digestion of food waste and cow manure
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2021 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 337, article id 125410Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In a circular economy approach, edible filamentous fungi (single cell protein) can be cultivated on volatile fatty acids (VFAs) derived from anaerobic digestion (AD) of organic-rich waste streams. In this study, the effect of pH, concentration/distribution of VFAs, nutrient supplementation, and type of waste on Aspergillus oryzae cultivation on synthetic VFAs, and actual VFAs derived from AD of food waste and cow manure were investigated. The optimal pH for A. oryzae growth on VFAs were 6 and 7 with maximum acetic acid consumption rates of 0.09 g/L. h. The fungus could thrive on high concentrations of acetic (up to 9 g/L) yielding 0.29 g dry biomass/gVFAs(fed). In mixed VFAs cultures, A. oryzae primarily consumed caproic and acetic acids reaching a biomass yield of 0.26 g dry biomass/gVFAs(fed) (containing up to 41% protein). For waste-derived VFAs at pH 6, the fungus successfully consumed 81-100% of caproic, acetic, and butyric acids.

Keywords
Food waste, Anaerobic digestion, Volatile fatty acids, Edible filamentous fungi, Aspergillus oryzae, ACETIC-ACID, SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE, BIOMASS PROTEIN, GROWTH, INHIBITION, ETHANOL, PH, FERMENTATION, MICROORGANISMS, PROPORTIONS
National Category
Other Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-26311 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2021.125410 (DOI)000677956400003 ()2-s2.0-85109013033 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-08-30 Created: 2021-08-30 Last updated: 2021-10-21
Rousta, N., Hellwig, C., Wainaina, S., Lukitawesa, L., Agnihotri, S., Rousta, K. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2021). Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus oryzae for Food: From Submerged Cultivation to Fungal Burgers and Their Sensory Evaluation – A Pilot Study. Foods, 10(11), Article ID 2774.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus oryzae for Food: From Submerged Cultivation to Fungal Burgers and Their Sensory Evaluation – A Pilot Study
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2021 (English)In: Foods, E-ISSN 2304-8158, Vol. 10, no 11, article id 2774Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

New food sources are explored to provide food security in sustainable ways. The submerged fermentation of edible filamentous fungi is a promising strategy to provide nutritious and affordable food that is expected to have a low environmental impact. The aim of the current study was to assess the novel use of Aspergillus oryzae cultivated in submerged fermentation on oat flour as a source for food products that do not undergo secondary fermentation or significant downstream processing. The fungus was cultivated in a pilot-scale airlift bioreactor, and the biomass concentration and protein content of the biomass were assessed. A tasting with an untrained panel assessed consumer preferences regarding the taste and texture of minimally processed vegetarian and vegan burger patties made from the biomass, and how the patties fared against established meat-alternative-based patties. The cultivation of Aspergillus oryzae resulted in a yield of 6 g/L dry biomass with a protein content of 37% on a dry weight basis. The taste and texture of the minimally processed fungal burger patties were to the liking of some participants. This was also reflected in diverse feedback provided by the participants. The cultivation of the fungus on oat flour and its utilization in developing burger patties shows its promising potential for the production of nutritious food. The applications of the fungus can be further developed by exploring other favorable ways to texture and season this relatively new functional food source to the preferences of consumers. 

Keywords
Plant Science, Health Professions (miscellaneous), Health(social science), Microbiology, Food Science
National Category
Engineering and Technology Natural Sciences Social Sciences
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-26900 (URN)10.3390/foods10112774 (DOI)000806924000001 ()2-s2.0-85119110546 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-11-12 Created: 2021-11-12 Last updated: 2023-08-18Bibliographically approved
Qin, S., Wainaina, S., Kumar Asasthi, S., Mahboubi, A., Liu, T., Liu, H., . . . Mukesh Kumar, A. (2021). Fungal dynamics during anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge combined with food waste at high organic loading rates in immersed membrane bioreactors. Bioresource Technology, 335, Article ID 125296.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fungal dynamics during anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge combined with food waste at high organic loading rates in immersed membrane bioreactors
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2021 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 335, article id 125296Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, the influence of distinct hydraulic retention times (HRT) and organic loading rates (OLRs) on fungal dynamics during food waste anaerobic digestion in immersed membrane-based bio-reactors (iMBR) were investigated. The organic loading rate 4–8 g VS/L/d (R1) and 6–10 g VS/L/d (R2) were set in two iMBR. T1 (1d), T2 (15d) and T3 (34d) samples collected from each bioreactor were analyzed fungal community by using 18s rDNA. In R2, T2 had the most abundant Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota and Mucoromycota. As for R1, T3 also had the richest Cryptomycota except above four kinds of fungi. Subsequently, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Non-Metric Multi-Dimensional Scaling (NMDS) indicated that fungal diversity was varied among the all three phases (T1, T2, and T3) and each treatment (R1 and R2). Finally, the results showed that different OLRs and HRT have significantly influenced the fungal community. 

Keywords
Acidogenic fermentation, Fungal community, Immersed membrane bioreactor, Organic loading rate, Volatile fatty acids, anaerobic digestion, bioreactor, community composition, food waste, fungus, membrane, sludge, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, methane, anaerobic growth, food, sewage, waste disposal, Anaerobiosis, Bioreactors, Fungi, Refuse Disposal
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-25805 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2021.125296 (DOI)000660496200001 ()34022478 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85107699164 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-07-06 Created: 2021-07-06 Last updated: 2022-09-27Bibliographically approved
Jomnonkhaow, U., Uwineza, C., Mahboubi, A., Wainaina, S., Reungsang, A. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2021). Membrane bioreactor-assisted volatile fatty acids production and in situ recovery from cow manure. Bioresource Technology, 321, Article ID 124456.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Membrane bioreactor-assisted volatile fatty acids production and in situ recovery from cow manure
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2021 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Bioresource Technology, Vol. 321, article id 124456Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cow manure (CM) generation in large volumes has for long been considered a waste management challenge. However, the organic content of CM signals opportunities for the production of value-added bioproducts such as volatile fatty acids (VFAs) through anaerobic digestion (AD). However, a robust VFAs fermentation process requires effective methane formation inhibition and enhance VFAs recovery. In this study, thermal pretreatment was applied to inhibit methanogens for enhanced VFAs production and an immersed membrane bioreactor (iMBR) for in situ recovery of VFAs in a semi-continuous AD. Maximal VFAs yield of 0.41 g VFAs/g volatile solids (VS) was obtained from thermally-treated CM without inoculum addition. The CM was further fed to the iMBR operating at organic loading rates of 0.8–4.7 gVS/L.d. The VFAs concentration increased to 6.93 g/L by rising substrate loading to 4.7 g VS/L.d. The applied iMBR set-up was successfully used for stable long-term (114 days) VFAs production and recovery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Anaerobic digestion, Cow manure, Membrane bioreactor, Volatile fatty acids, Bioproducts, Bioreactors, Fertilizers, Manures, Recovery, Substrates, Fermentation process, Immersed membrane bioreactors, Management challenges, Organic loading rates, Substrate loading, Thermal pre-treatment, Volatile fatty acids (VFAs), acetic acid, butyric acid, calcium ion, carbon dioxide, copper, formic acid, hydrogen, iron, magnesium, manganese, methane, phosphoric acid, potassium, propionic acid, sodium ion, volatile fatty acid, zinc ion, bioreactor, concentration (composition), fermentation, inhibition, inoculation, membrane, methanogenic bacterium, anaerobic sludge, Article, batch fermentation, chemical oxygen demand, cow, female, food waste, gas chromatography, limit of detection, manure, methanogen, microbial diversity, municipal wastewater, nonhuman, pH, priority journal, sludge, suspended particulate matter, thermal conductivity, waste water management, anaerobic growth, animal, bovine, Anaerobiosis, Animals, Cattle, Fatty Acids, Volatile
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-25818 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2020.124456 (DOI)000604219100006 ()33276207 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85097198010 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-04479
Available from: 2021-07-06 Created: 2021-07-06 Last updated: 2021-07-07Bibliographically approved
Mukesh Kumar, A., Wainaina, S., Mahboubi, A., Zhang, Z. Q. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2021). Methanogen and nitrifying genes dynamics in immersed membrane bioreactors during anaerobic co-digestion of different organic loading rates food waste. Bioresource Technology, 342, Article ID 125920.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Methanogen and nitrifying genes dynamics in immersed membrane bioreactors during anaerobic co-digestion of different organic loading rates food waste
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2021 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 342, article id 125920Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This work was aimed to evaluate the distinctive food waste (FW) organic loading rates (OLR) on methanogen and nitrifying genes dynamics and its correlation with identified relative abundance of bacterial dynamics during the anaerobic digestion. This experiment were carried out in the digesters at high OLR of food wastes at (4 to 8 g volatile solids/liter/day reactor R1) and (6 to 10 g volatile solids/liter/day reactor R2). The results shown that the relative abundance of mcrA, mcrB and mcrG genes were richest in the first day of both R1 and R2. In addition, the most of nitrifying genes were greater in after 34 days digestion in R2, while these genes did not show the specific regularity in R1. Finally, the correlation figure shows that Clostridium and Lactobacillus genera were significantly correlated with the different organic acids and methanogen and nitrifying genes dynamics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Methanogen and nitrifying genes, Anaerobic digestion, Organic loading rate, Food waste, VOLATILE FATTY-ACIDS, COMMUNITY, MCRA, HYDROGEN
National Category
Bioenergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-26561 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2021.125920 (DOI)000697545300003 ()2-s2.0-85114810403 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-10-01 Created: 2021-10-01 Last updated: 2021-10-21Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4709-5126

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