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Mahboubi, Amir
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 53) Show all publications
Mohammadkhani, G., Mahboubi, A., Plöhn, M., Funk, C. & Ylitervo, P. (2024). The potential of Nordic microalgae in nutrient removal from anaerobic digestion effluents. Physiologia Plantarum, 176(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The potential of Nordic microalgae in nutrient removal from anaerobic digestion effluents
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2024 (English)In: Physiologia Plantarum, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 176, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anaerobic digestion is a promising method for organic waste treatment. While the obtained digestate can function as fertilizer, the liquid fraction produced is rather problematic to discharge due to its high nitrogen and chemical oxygen demand contents. Microalgae have great potential in sustainable nutrient removal from wastewater. This study aimed at evaluating native Swedish microalgae cultivation (batch operation mode, 25°C and continuous light of 80 μmol m−2 s−1) on anaerobic digestion effluent of pulp and paper sludge (PPS) or chicken manure (CKM) to remove ammonium and volatile fatty acids (VFAs). While algal strains, Chlorella vulgaris, Chlorococcum sp., Coelastrella sp., Scotiellopsis reticulata and Desmodesmus sp., could assimilate VFAs as carbon source, acetic acid was the most preferred. Higher algal biomass and cell densities were achieved using PPS compared to CKM. In PPS, Coelastrella sp. and Chlorella vulgaris reached the highest cell densities after 15 days, about 79 × 106 and 43 × 106 cells mL−1, respectively. Although in PPS, ammonium was completely assimilated (195 mg L−1), this was only 46% (172 mg L−1) in CKM. Coelastrella sp. produced the highest biomass concentration independently of the medium (1.84 g L−1 in PPS and 1.99 g L−1 in CKM). This strain is a promising candidate for nutrient removal and biomass production in the aforementioned media, followed by Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorococcum sp. They have great potential to reduce the environmental impact of industrial anaerobic digestion effluents in Nordic countries.

National Category
Other Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-31282 (URN)10.1111/ppl.14153 (DOI)001134340600001 ()2-s2.0-85181494300 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2019‐00492
Note

The authors are thankful to ÅForsk (22-228) for the financial support of this project. The authors also are grateful to the Swedish Research Council FORMAS (2019-00492) to CF, Bio4Energy (www.bio4energy.se) to CF and Umeå University for their financial support.

Available from: 2024-01-11 Created: 2024-01-11 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Vu, H. D., Mahboubi, A., Root, A., Heinmaa, I., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Åkesson, D. (2023). Application of Immersed Membrane Bioreactor for Semi-Continuous Production of Polyhydroxyalkanoates from Organic Waste-Based Volatile Fatty Acids. Membranes, 13(6), Article ID 569.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Application of Immersed Membrane Bioreactor for Semi-Continuous Production of Polyhydroxyalkanoates from Organic Waste-Based Volatile Fatty Acids
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2023 (English)In: Membranes, ISSN 2077-0375, E-ISSN 2077-0375, Vol. 13, no 6, article id 569Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) appear to be an economical carbon feedstock for the cost-effective production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). The use of VFAs, however, could impose a drawback of substrate inhibition at high concentrations, resulting in low microbial PHA productivity in batch cultivations. In this regard, retaining high cell density using immersed membrane bioreactor (iMBR) in a (semi-) continuous process could enhance production yields. In this study, an iMBR with a flat-sheet membrane was applied for semi-continuous cultivation and recovery of Cupriavidus necator in a bench-scale bioreactor using VFAs as the sole carbon source. The cultivation was prolonged up to 128 h under an interval feed of 5 g/L VFAs at a dilution rate of 0.15 (d−1), yielding a maximum biomass and PHA production of 6.6 and 2.8 g/L, respectively. Potato liquor and apple pomace-based VFAs with a total concentration of 8.8 g/L were also successfully used in the iMBR, rendering the highest PHA content of 1.3 g/L after 128 h of cultivation. The PHAs obtained from both synthetic and real VFA effluents were affirmed to be poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) with a crystallinity degree of 23.8 and 9.6%, respectively. The application of iMBR could open an opportunity for semi-continuous production of PHA, increasing the feasibility of upscaling PHA production using waste-based VFAs. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
biopolymer, immersed membrane reactor, polyhydroxyalkanoates, volatile fatty acids, Bioconversion, Bioreactors, Carbon, Cost effectiveness, Crystallinity, Effluents, Carbon feedstock, Continuous production, Cost-effective production, Immersed membrane, Immersed membrane bioreactors, Membrane reactor, Organic wastes, Semi-continuous, Biopolymers
National Category
Other Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-30312 (URN)10.3390/membranes13060569 (DOI)001014724600001 ()2-s2.0-85164028978 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-14 Created: 2023-08-14 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Mousavi, N., Parchami, M., Kumar Ramamoorthy, S., Mahboubi, A., Hakkarainen, M. & Zamani, A. (2023). Bioconversion of Carrot Pomace to Value-Added Products: Rhizopus delemar Fungal Biomass and Cellulose. Fermentation, 9(4), Article ID 374.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioconversion of Carrot Pomace to Value-Added Products: Rhizopus delemar Fungal Biomass and Cellulose
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2023 (English)In: Fermentation, E-ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 9, no 4, article id 374Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Carrot pomace (CP) which is generated in a large volume in the juice production process, is rich in cellulose, hemicellulose, sugars, pectin, and minerals. However, in many previous investigations, only cellulose was purified and utilized while other components of CP were discarded as waste. Here, CP was valorized into fungal biomass and cellulose with the aim of utilizing all the CP components. Enzymatic pretreatments were applied to solubilize the digestible fraction of CP including hemicellulose, pectin, sucrose, and other sugars for fungal cultivation, while cellulose remained intact in the solid fraction. The dissolved fraction was utilized as a substrate for the cultivation of an edible fungus (Rhizopus delemar). Fungal cultivation was performed in shake flasks and bench-scale bioreactors. The highest fungal biomass concentration was obtained after pretreatment with invertase (5.01 g/L) after 72 h of cultivation (36 and 42% higher than the concentrations obtained after hemicellulase and pectinase treatments, respectively). Invertase pretreatment resulted in the hydrolysis of sucrose, which could then be taken up by the fungus. Carbohydrate analysis showed 28–33% glucan, 4.1–4.9% other polysaccharides, 0.01% lignin, and 2.7–7% ash in the CP residues after enzymatic pretreatment. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis also confirmed the presence of cellulose in this fraction. The obtained fungal biomass has a high potential for food or feed applications, or as a raw material for the development of biomaterials. Cellulose could be purified from the solid fraction and used for applications such as biobased-textiles or membranes for wastewater treatment, where pure cellulose is needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
filamentous fungi, Rhizopus delemar, carrot pomace, cellulose, enzymatic hydrolysis, fungal cultivation
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-29841 (URN)10.3390/fermentation9040374 (DOI)000976439500001 ()2-s2.0-85153943536 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-26 Created: 2023-05-26 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Parchami, M., Mahboubi, A., Agnihotri, S. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2023). Biovalorization of brewer's spent grain as single-cell protein through coupling organosolv pretreatment and fungal cultivation. Waste Management, 169, 382-391
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biovalorization of brewer's spent grain as single-cell protein through coupling organosolv pretreatment and fungal cultivation
2023 (English)In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 169, p. 382-391Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Brewer's spent grain (BSG) is a clean byproduct from the food sector, comprising 85% of the brewing process solid byproducts. BSG is mainly used as low-quality animal feed and often ends up in landfills due to its short shelf life. However, considering its abundant availability and high nutritional content, BSG holds the potential for biorefineries to produce valuable products. The recalcitrant nature of BSG poses a challenge, requiring pretreatment steps. Therefore, this study focused on valorizing BSG obtained from organosolv pretreatment by producing food- and feed-grade single-cell protein (SCP). The BSG was subject to organosolv pretreatment at 180C for 2 h with 50% v/v ethanol as solvent. Filamentous fungi N. intermedia and A. oryzae were cultivated on as-received and different fractions of organosolv-treated BSG to evaluate the effect of factors such as pretreatment, fungal strain, pretreated fraction content, and substrate loading on fungal biomass yield, biomass composition (protein content), and metabolite production. A. oryzae cultivation on all tested substrates yielded 7%-40% more biomass than N. intermedia. Cultivating A. oryzae on organosolv liquor resulted in the highest biomass protein content (44.8% ± 0.7%) with a fungal biomass concentration of 5.1 g/L. A three-fold increase in the substrate loading increased the ethanol-to-substrate yield by 50%, while protein content was decreased by 23%. Finally, a biorefinery concept was proposed to integrate the organosolv pretreatment of BSG with fungal cultivation for maximum yield of SCP while obtaining other products such as lignin and ethanol, providing a sustainable rout for managing BSG.

Keywords
Brewer's spent grain, Single cell protein, Filamentous fungi, Organosolv pretreatment, Biorefinery
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-30192 (URN)10.1016/j.wasman.2023.07.021 (DOI)001051490100001 ()2-s2.0-85166301394 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-02 Created: 2023-08-02 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Uwineza, C., Bouzarjomehr, M., Parchami, M., Sar, T., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Mahboubi, A. (2023). Evaluation of in vitro digestibility of Aspergillus oryzae fungal biomass grown on organic residue derived-VFAs as a promising ruminant feed supplement. Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, 14, Article ID 120.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of in vitro digestibility of Aspergillus oryzae fungal biomass grown on organic residue derived-VFAs as a promising ruminant feed supplement
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, E-ISSN 2049-1891, Vol. 14, article id 120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

As demand for high quality animal feed continues to raise, it becomes increasingly important to minimize the environmental impact of feed production. An appealing sustainable approach to provide feed fractions is to use organic residues from agro-food industry. In this regard, volatile fatty acids (VFAs) such as acetic, propionic and butyric acids, derived from bioconversion of organic residues can be used as precursors for production of microbial protein with ruminant feed inclusion potential. This study aims to investigate the in vitro digestibility of the Aspergillus oryzae edible fungal biomass cultivated on VFAs-derived from anaerobic digestion of residues. The produced fungal protein biomass, along with hay clover silage and rapeseed meal were subjected to various in vitro assays using two-stage Tilley and Terry (TT), gas, and bag methods to evaluate and compare its digestibility for application in ruminant feed.

Results

The produced fungal biomass contained a higher crude protein (CP) (41%–49%) and rather similar neutral detergent fiber (NDF) (41%–56%) compared to rapeseed meal. The rumen in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD) of the fungal biomass in the TT method ranged from 82% to 88% (statistically similar to that of the gas method (72% to 85%)). The IVDMD of fungal biomass were up to 26% and 40% greater than that of hay clover silage and rapeseed meal, respectively. The type of substrate and bag method had pronounced effect on the fermentation products (ammonium-N (NH4+-N), total gas and VFAs). Fungal biomass digestion resulted in the highest release of NH4+-N (340–540 mg/L) and the ratio of acetate to propionate ratio (3.5) among subjected substrates.

Conclusion

The results indicate that gas method can be used as a reliable predictor for IVDMD as well as fermentation products. Furthermore, the high IVDMD and fermentation product observed for Aspergillus oryzae fungal biomass digestion, suggest that the supplementation of fungal biomass will contribute to improving the rumen digestion by providing necessary nitrogen and energy to the ruminant and microbiota.

Keywords
Aspergillus oryzae, Fungal biomass, In vitro dry matter digestibility, Ruminant feed, Volatile fatty acids
National Category
Agricultural Science
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-30702 (URN)10.1186/s40104-023-00922-4 (DOI)001084403800001 ()2-s2.0-85173759399 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-01 Created: 2023-11-01 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Wang, R., Sar, T., Mahboubi, A., Fristedt, R., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Undeland, I. (2023). In vitro protein digestibility of edible filamentous fungi compared to common food protein sources. Food Bioscience, 54, Article ID 102862.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In vitro protein digestibility of edible filamentous fungi compared to common food protein sources
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2023 (English)In: Food Bioscience, ISSN 2212-4292, E-ISSN 2212-4306, Vol. 54, article id 102862Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Edible filamentous fungi, as a source of mycoprotein, is an emerging sustainable protein source as it can be cultivated on food-industry sidestreams, thus providing the food system with circularity. However, the digestibility of mycoprotein from different species of fungi is yet to be studied and compared to commonly consumed food proteins derived from muscle. Using the static INFOGEST in vitro gastrointestinal (GI) digestion protocol, but with less pancreatin than the recommended amount to omit high background from enzyme autolysis, this study investigated the protein degree of hydrolysis (DH%) and amino acid accessibility of five species of edible fungi in comparison with salmon fillet, chicken breast, beef tenderloin and casein. Three of the edible fungi species reached protein DH% between 58% ± 2.6% and 62% ± 5.6% during GI digestion compared to chicken, salmon, and beef reaching 62%–67% as well as casein at 55%. The amino acid accessibility of fungi (81%–92%), was comparable to that of salmon, chicken breast, and beef (90%–94%). This study thus indicated that edible fungi is a sustainable and nutritionally sound protein source.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Amino acid, Degree of hydrolysis, Edible filamentous fungi, In vitro digestion, Protein
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-30295 (URN)10.1016/j.fbio.2023.102862 (DOI)001039144900001 ()2-s2.0-85164349427 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-14 Created: 2023-08-14 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Parchami, M., Uwineza, C., Ibeabuchi, O. H., Rustas, B.-O., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Mahboubi, A. (2023). Membrane bioreactor assisted volatile fatty acids production from agro-industrial residues for ruminant feed application. Waste Management, 170, 62-74
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Membrane bioreactor assisted volatile fatty acids production from agro-industrial residues for ruminant feed application
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2023 (English)In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 170, p. 62-74Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) supplementation in ruminants’ diet as a source of energy and chemical precursors and their effect on animal’s physiology and well-being has long been of scientific interest. Production of VFAs through anaerobic digestion of agro-industrial residues not only creates value but also presents an alternative sustainable approach for ruminant feed supplementation. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the bioconversion of agro-industrial residues produced in large quantities such as apple pomace (AP), thin stillage (Ts), and potato protein liquor (PPL) to VFAs, fully complying to regulations set for ruminant feed supplement production. In this regard, batch acidogenic fermentation assays (pH 6–10) and semi-continuous immersed membrane bioreactor (iMBR) were applied. In batch assays, at pH 10 the co-digestion of Ts and PPL produced the highest VFAs concentration (14.2 g/L), indicating a yield of 0.85 g CODVFAs/g volatile solids (VS)added. The optimum batch condition was then applied in the iMBR for in situ fermentation and recovery of VFAs at different organic loading rates (OLR). With increasing the OLR to 3.7 gVS/L.day, the highest VFAs concentration of 28.6 g/L (1,2 g CODVFAs /gVSadded) was achieved. Successful long-term (114 days) membrane filtration was conducted in a media with a maximum of 40 g/L of total solids (TS), facing irreversible membrane fouling in the final stages. Acidogenic fermentation using an iMBR has the potential to play an important role in the future of feed additive provision through the biorefining of agro-industrial wastes via the carboxylate platform, given the role of VFAs production from organic residues.

Keywords
Agro-industrial residues, Anaerobic digestion, Volatile fatty acids, Ruminant feed, Membrane bioreactor
National Category
Other Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-31281 (URN)10.1016/j.wasman.2023.07.032 (DOI)001053655500001 ()2-s2.0-85169934371 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish University of Agricultural SciencesUniversity of BoråsVinnova
Available from: 2024-01-11 Created: 2024-01-11 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Toghiani, J., Fallah, N., Nasernejad, B., Mahboubi, A., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Afsham, N. (2023). Sustainable Pistachio Dehulling Waste Management and Its Valorization Approaches: A Review. Current Pollution Reports, 60-75
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable Pistachio Dehulling Waste Management and Its Valorization Approaches: A Review
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2023 (English)In: Current Pollution Reports, E-ISSN 2198-6592, p. 60-75Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose of Review

In countries such the USA, Iran, and Turkey, pistachio nut is considered one of the most economically valuable agricultural products. Pistachio production and related dehulling processes generate a large quantity of organic waste, containing green hull, cluster woody part, shells, and leaves. The inadequate conventional management of such wastes calls for sustainable and economical strategies not only to enhance resource efficiency but also to create value.

Recent Findings

Pistachio residues have a high content of total extractives and essential oils and a considerable amount of phenolic compounds that explain their good antioxidant activities and other potential human health benefits. Furthermore, considering the generation volume (about 660,000 tons) and lignocellulosic structure, pistachio residues can also be sustainably used to produce value-added products, such as biofuels, phytochemicals, activated carbon, and other potential bioproducts such as filamentous fungi as protein enriched biomass, single-cell protein (SCP), and volatile fatty acids. In general, recent studies have not  comprehensively investigated all value-added potential products.

Summary

This review provides a thourough insight into the present pistachio processing industries, and pistachio waste chemical composition and characteristics. Furthermore, the applications of pistachio residues as a renewable source for the production of potential value-added products by various thermochemical (pyrolysis, gasification, and liquefaction), physicochemical (solvent extraction, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), and extraction by pressurized liquids (PLE)), and biological (anaerobic digestion (AD) and fermentation (solid-state and submerged)) processes are presented including an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of such methods. In this regard, production of new products such as edible filamentous fungi and antioxidant, and their market appeal has been briefly considered.

National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-29104 (URN)10.1007/s40726-022-00240-9 (DOI)000888715000001 ()2-s2.0-85142639611 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-12 Created: 2022-12-12 Last updated: 2024-01-16Bibliographically approved
Sapmaz, T., Manafi, R., Mahboubi, A., Koseoglu-Imer, D. Y. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2023). The Effect of Sequential and Simultaneous Supplementation of Waste-Derived Volatile Fatty Acids and Methanol as Alternative Carbon Source Blend for Wastewater Denitrification. Sustainability, 15(8), Article ID 6849.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effect of Sequential and Simultaneous Supplementation of Waste-Derived Volatile Fatty Acids and Methanol as Alternative Carbon Source Blend for Wastewater Denitrification
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2023 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 8, article id 6849Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Supplementation of alternative carbon sources is a technological bottleneck, particularly in post-denitrification processes due to stringent effluent nitrogen levels. This study focuses on enhancing the sustainability of wastewater treatment practices by partially replacing conventionally used fossil-derived methanol with organic waste-derived volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs). In this regards, results of denitrification batch assays with sequential or simultaneous addition of VFA effluent from acidogenic fermentation of potato starch residue (AD-VFAPPL) and chicken manure (AD-VFACKM), simulated synthetic VFAs solutions (sVFAs), and methanol as carbon source were presented and discussed. Although methanol has proven superior in the conversion of nitrate to nitrite, VFAs are more effective when it comes to reducing nitrite. Although solely added AD-VFAPPL had a slower denitrification capability (0.56 ± 0.13 mgNOx-N removed/m2/day) than methanol (1.04 ± 0.46 mgNOx-N removed/m2/day), up to 50% of the methanol can be replaced by waste-derived AD-VFAPPL and achieve comparable performance (1.08 ± 0.07 mgNOx-N removed/m2/day) with the pure methanol. This proves that the co-addition of VFAs together with methanol can fully compete with pure methanol in performance, providing a promising opportunity for wastewater treatment plants to potentially reduce their carbon footprint and become more sustainable in practice while benefiting from recovered nutrients from waste.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
volatile fatty acids, post-denitrification, moving bed biofilm reactor, carbon source, chicken manure, potato protein liquor, ethanol, methanol
National Category
Other Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-29721 (URN)10.3390/su15086849 (DOI)000979586400001 ()2-s2.0-85156147545 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2020-03664
Available from: 2023-04-26 Created: 2023-04-26 Last updated: 2024-02-21Bibliographically approved
Sapmaz, T., Uwineza, C., Mahboubi, A., De Wever, H., Koseoglu-Imer, D. Y. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2023). Towards maximum value creation from potato protein liquor: volatile fatty acids production from fungal cultivation effluent. Biomass Conversion and Biorefinery
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards maximum value creation from potato protein liquor: volatile fatty acids production from fungal cultivation effluent
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2023 (English)In: Biomass Conversion and Biorefinery, ISSN 2190-6815, E-ISSN 2190-6823Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The cornerstones of an efficient circular waste management strategy aiming for enhanced resource efficiency are maximizing organic waste valorization and improving residual conversion to biochemicals. In this regard, this study focuses on the production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) from the effluent of fungi biomass cultivation on low-grade residues from the potato starch industry with batch and semi-continuous membrane bioreactors (MBRs) containing the effluent of already fermented potato protein liquor (FPPL) inoculated with chicken and cow manure. The effect of pH in the batch experiments on the production and yield of VFAs during acidogenic digestion was evaluated. Rapid generation of VFAs at a concentration of up to 11.8 g/L could be successfully achieved in the MBR. Under the optimal conditions, a high yield of 0.65 g VFAs/g VSfed was obtained for the organic loading rate (OLR) of 1 g VS/L/d using FPPL substrate and chicken manure as inoculum. The results show that the application of sequential multi-step bioconversion of potato starch industry residues has the potential to increase the variety of value-added products generated from a single organic residue while enhancing nutrient recovery capacity. 

National Category
Other Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-29327 (URN)10.1007/s13399-023-03782-0 (DOI)000915884600004 ()2-s2.0-85146255673 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-17 Created: 2023-01-17 Last updated: 2024-02-21
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