Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Mahboubi, Amir
Alternative names
Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Mahboubi, A., Lundin, M., Doyen, W., De Wever, H. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2018). Diffusion-based reverse membrane bioreactor for simultaneous bioconversion of high-inhibitor xylose-glucose media. Process Biochemistry, 72, 23-30
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diffusion-based reverse membrane bioreactor for simultaneous bioconversion of high-inhibitor xylose-glucose media
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Process Biochemistry, ISSN 1359-5113, E-ISSN 1873-3298, Vol. 72, p. 23-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Reverse membrane bioreactor, Concentration gradient, Diffusion rate, Fermentation, Inhibitor detoxification
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15219 (URN)10.1016/j.procbio.2018.06.007 (DOI)000442710600003 ()2-s2.0-85048947972 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-31 Created: 2018-10-31 Last updated: 2018-11-21Bibliographically approved
Wainaina, S., Mohsen, P., Mahboubi, A., Sárvári Horváth, I. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2018). Food waste-derived volatile fatty acids platform using an immersed membrane bioreactor. Bioresource Technology, Article ID S0960-8524(18)31650-X.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food waste-derived volatile fatty acids platform using an immersed membrane bioreactor
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, article id S0960-8524(18)31650-XArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are the key intermediates from anaerobic digestion (AD) process that can be a platform to synthesize products of higher value than biogas. However, some obstacles still exist that prevent large-scale production and application of VFAs, key among them being the difficulty in recovering the acids from the fermentation medium and low product yields. In this study, a novel anaerobic immersed membrane bioreactor (iMBR) with robust cleaning capabilities, which incorporated frequent backwashing to withstand the complex AD medium, was designed and applied for production and in situ recovery of VFAs. The iMBR was fed with food waste and operated without pH control, achieving a high yield of 0.54 g VFA/g VSadded. The continuous VFA recovery process was investigated for 40 days at OLRs of 2 gVS/L/d and 4 gVS/L/d without significant change in the permeate flux at a maximum suspended solids concentration of 31 g/L.

Keywords
Food waste, Fouling control, Immersed membrane bioreactor, In situ recovery, Volatile fatty acids
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15420 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2018.11.104 (DOI)2-s2.0-85057618430 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2018-12-27Bibliographically approved
Thunuguntla, R., Mahboubi, A., Ferreira, J. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2018). Integration of Membrane Bioreactors with Edible Filamentous Fungi for Valorization of Expired Milk. , 10(6)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integration of Membrane Bioreactors with Edible Filamentous Fungi for Valorization of Expired Milk
2018 (English)Other (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Around 29 million tons of milk end as waste yearly in Europe, representing an environmental issue but also a potential substrate for biological valorization given its nutritional value. Aspergillus oryzae and Neurospora intermedia are edible filamentous fungi with dissimilar metabolism when grown in expired milk. Neurospora intermedia is more devoted to lactose consumption; 68 and 57% of lactose was consumed after cultivation in expired milk and its liquid fraction, respectively. Aspergillus oryzae consumed less lactose in expired milk (14%), but led to better microfiltration characteristics of the final effluent due to fat and protein degradation. A two-stage fed-batch cultivation using membrane bioreactors (MBRs) was developed, bringing together both fungal metabolic characteristics when grown in 70% diluted expired milk. In the first MBR, A.oryzae degraded fat and protein, improved microfiltration, and produced ca 11 g/L of biomass. In the second MBR, N. intermedia consumed the remaining lactose in the permeate and originated ca 7 g/L of biomass. The developed system was successful for valorization of non-sterile milk due to the balance between consumption of bacterial growth-derived acids, consequent pH, and fungal enzymatic activities. Besides, a final clear effluent (83% reduction of COD) was obtained, which is of interest considering wastewater treatment.

Keywords
ethanol, expired milk, edible filamentous fungi, fat degradation, fungal biomass, lactose consumption, membrane bioreactors, microfiltration, protein degradation, two-stage cultivation
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15218 (URN)10.3390/su10061940 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-10-31 Created: 2018-10-31 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Mahboubi, A., Cayli, B., Bulkan, G., Doyen, W., De Wever, H. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2018). Removal of Bacterial Contamination from Bioethanol Fermentation System Using Membrane Bioreactor. Fermentation, 4(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Removal of Bacterial Contamination from Bioethanol Fermentation System Using Membrane Bioreactor
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Fermentation, Vol. 4, no 4Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

A major issue hindering efficient industrial ethanol fermentation from sugar-based feedstock is excessive unwanted bacterial contamination. In industrial scale fermentation, reaching complete sterility is costly, laborious, and difficult to sustain in long-term operation. A physical selective separation of a co-culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and an Enterobacter cloacae complex from a buffer solution and fermentation media at dilution rates of 0.1–1 1/h were examined using an immersed membrane bioreactor (iMBR). The effect of the presence of yeast, inoculum size, membrane pore size, and surface area, backwashing and dilution rate on bacteria removal were assessed by evaluating changes in the filtration conditions, medium turbidity, and concentration of compounds and cell biomass. The results showed that using the iMBR with dilution rate of 0.5 1/h results in successful removal of 93% of contaminating bacteria in the single culture and nearly complete bacteria decontamination in yeast-bacteria co-culture. During continuous fermentation, application of lower permeate fluxes provided a stable filtration of the mixed culture with enhanced bacteria washout. This physical selective separation of bacteria from yeast can enhance final ethanol quality and yields, process profitability, yeast metabolic activity, and decrease downstream processing costs.

Keywords
membrane bioreactor, filtration, bacterial decontamination, fermentation
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15222 (URN)10.3390/fermentation4040088 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-10-31 Created: 2018-10-31 Last updated: 2018-11-21Bibliographically approved
Karimi, S., Mahboobi Soofiani, N., Mahboubi, A. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2018). Use of Organic Wastes and Industrial By-Products to Produce Filamentous Fungi with Potential as Aqua-Feed Ingredients. Sustainability, 10(9)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of Organic Wastes and Industrial By-Products to Produce Filamentous Fungi with Potential as Aqua-Feed Ingredients
2018 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 9Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Organic-rich waste and industrial by-product streams, generated in enormous amounts on a daily basis, contain substantial amounts of nutrients that are worthy of recovery. Biological conversion of organic-waste streams using filamentous fungi is a promising approach to convert nutrients into value-added bioproducts, such as fungal biomass. High-protein fungal biomass contains different kinds and levels of amino acids, fatty acids, immunostimulants, antioxidants, pigments, etc., which make it a potential choice for application in animal feed supplementation. Considering the challenges long faced by the aquaculture industry in fishmeal production due to the increasing prices and environmental concerns, the aquaculture industry is forced to provide alternative protein-rich sources to replace conventional fishmeal. In this review, the possibilities of utilization of filamentous fungi biomass cultivated on organic-rich waste streams, as an alternative nutrient source in fish feed, were thoroughly reviewed.

Keywords
Organic-rich waste, nutrient recovery, fungal biomass, fish feed formulation, proximate analysis
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15217 (URN)10.3390/su10093296 (DOI)000446770200339 ()2-s2.0-85053405756 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-31 Created: 2018-10-31 Last updated: 2018-11-22Bibliographically approved
Mahboubi, A., Ylitervo, P., Doyen, W., De Wever, H., Molenberghs, B. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2017). Continuous bioethanol fermentation from wheat straw hydrolysate with high suspended solid content using an immersed flat sheet membrane bioreactor.. Bioresource Technology, 241, 296-308
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Continuous bioethanol fermentation from wheat straw hydrolysate with high suspended solid content using an immersed flat sheet membrane bioreactor.
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 241, p. 296-308Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Finding a technol. approach that eases the prodn. of lignocellulosic bioethanol has long been considered as a great industrial challenge. In the current study a membrane bioreactor (MBR) set-up using integrated permeate channel (IPC) membrane panels was used to simultaneously ferment pentose and hexose sugars to ethanol in continuous fermn. of high suspended solid wheat straw hydrolyzate. The MBR was optimized to flawlessly operated at high SS concns. of up to 20% without any significant changes in the permeate flux and transmembrane pressure. By the help of the retained high cell concn., the yeast cells were capable of tolerating and detoxifying the inhibitory medium and succeeded to co-consume all glucose and up to 83% of xylose in a continuous fermn. mode leading to up to 83% of the theor. ethanol yield. [on SciFinder(R)]

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd., 2017
Keywords
Membrane bioreactor, Lignocellulose, Bioethanol, Continuous fermentation
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12531 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2017.05.125 (DOI)000405502400037 ()2-s2.0-85020039248 (Scopus ID)
Note

Copyright (C) 2017 American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved.; CAPLUS AN 2017:885722(Journal; Online Computer File)

Available from: 2017-08-27 Created: 2017-08-27 Last updated: 2017-09-28Bibliographically approved
Mahboubi, A., Ferreira, J. A., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Lennartsson, P. R. (2017). Production of Fungal Biomass for Feed, Fatty Acids, and Glycerol by Aspergillus oryzae from Fat-Rich Dairy Substrates. Fermentation, 3(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Production of Fungal Biomass for Feed, Fatty Acids, and Glycerol by Aspergillus oryzae from Fat-Rich Dairy Substrates
2017 (English)In: Fermentation, ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 3, no 4Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Dairy waste is a complex mixture of nutrients requiring an integrated strategy for valorization into various products. The present work adds insights into the conversion of fat-rich dairy products into biomass, glycerol, and fatty acids via submerged cultivation with edible filamentous fungi. The pH influenced fat degradation, where Aspergillus oryzae lipase was more active at neutral than acidic pH (17 g/L vs. 0.5 g/L of released glycerol); the same trend was found during cultivation in crème fraiche (12 g/L vs. 1.7 g/L of released glycerol). In addition to glycerol, as a result of fat degradation, up to 3.6 and 4.5 g/L of myristic and palmitic acid, respectively, were released during A. oryzae growth in cream. The fungus was also able to grow in media containing 16 g/L of lactic acid, a common contaminant of dairy waste, being beneficial to naturally increase the initial acidic pH and trigger fat degradation. Considering that lactose consumption is suppressed in fat-rich media, a two-stage cultivation for conversion of dairy waste is also proposed in this work. Such an approach would provide biomass for possibly feed or human consumption, fatty acids, and an effluent of low organic matter tackling environmental and social problems associated with the dairy sector.

Keywords
biomass for feed, dairy waste, edible filamentous fungi, fatty acids, glycerol
National Category
Environmental Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12753 (URN)10.3390/fermentation3040048 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-09-28 Created: 2017-09-28 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Mahboubi, A., Ferreira, J. A., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Lennartsson, P. R. (2017). Value-added products from dairy waste using edible fungi. Waste Management, 59, 518-525
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Value-added products from dairy waste using edible fungi
2017 (English)In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 59, p. 518-525Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12542 (URN)10.1016/j.wasman.2016.11.017 (DOI)000390503000052 ()27864017 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85006306861 (Scopus ID)
Note

Copyright (C) 2017 U.S. National Library of Medicine.; MEDLINE AN 2017680900(Journal; Article; (JOURNAL ARTICLE))

Available from: 2017-08-27 Created: 2017-08-27 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Ferreira, J. A., Mahboubi, A., Lennartsson, P. R. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2016). Waste biorefineries using filamentous ascomycetes fungi: Present status and future prospects. Bioresource Technology, 215(sept), 334-345
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Waste biorefineries using filamentous ascomycetes fungi: Present status and future prospects
2016 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 215, no sept, p. 334-345Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Filamentous ascomycetes fungi have had important roles in natural cycles, and are already used industrially for e.g. supplying of citric, gluconic and itaconic acids as well as many enzymes. Faster human activities result in higher consumption of our resources and producing more wastes. Therefore, these fungi can be explored to use their capabilities to convert back wastes to resources. The present paper reviews the capabilities of these fungi in growing on various residuals, producing lignocellulose-degrading enzymes and production of organic acids, ethanol, pigments, etc. Particular attention has been on Aspergillus, Fusarium, Neurospora and Monascus genera. Since various species are used for production of human food, their biomass can be considered for feed applications and so biomass compositional characteristics as well as aspects related to culture in bioreactor are also provided. The review has been further complemented with future research avenues.[on SciFinder (R)]

Keywords
ascomycetes, biomass, enzymes, metabolites, waste biorefinery
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-10781 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2016.03.018 (DOI)000377935100037 ()2-s2.0-84961225986 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Energy AgencySwedish Research Council Formas
Note

MEDLINE AN 2016820118(Journal; Article; (JOURNAL ARTICLE); General Review; (REVIEW))

Available from: 2016-09-27 Created: 2016-09-27 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications