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Henricson, Maria
Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Zhou, L., Hong, J., Henricson, M., Qin, R., Dai, Y., Enskär, K., . . . Browall, M. (2023). Factors associated with posttraumatic growth among spouses of women diagnosed with gynaecological cancer: A cross‐sectional study. Nursing Open, 10(2), 630-640
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors associated with posttraumatic growth among spouses of women diagnosed with gynaecological cancer: A cross‐sectional study
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2023 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 630-640Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim

The aim of this study was to explore the factors that are associated with posttraumatic growth among spouses of women diagnosed with gynaecological cancer.

Design

A cross-sectional descriptive study.

Methods

A convenience sample of 312 spouses of women diagnosed with gynaecological cancer was recruited from two comprehensive hospitals in China, from March 2018 to March 2020. Demographic characteristics, cancer-related characteristics, posttraumatic growth, perceived social support and coping were assessed using self-reported questionnaires. Descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression analysis were performed. The methods were guided by the STROBE checklist.

Results

The mean score of posttraumatic growth was 46.7 (standard deviation = 16.7). The associated factors of posttraumatic growth were spouses' age, perceived social support, problem-focused coping, dysfunctional coping (e.g. denial) and cancer treatment received by partners, which accounted for 34% of total posttraumatic growth score.

Patient or public contribution

All participants contributed to the conducting of this study by completing self-reported questionnaires.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
coping, gynaecological cancer, posttraumatic growth, social support, spouses
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-28509 (URN)10.1002/nop2.1329 (DOI)000847429100001 ()2-s2.0-85137188454 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-09-07 Created: 2022-09-07 Last updated: 2024-01-16Bibliographically approved
Tengblad, J., Airosa, F., Karlsson, L., Rosenqvist, J., Elmqvist, C., Karlsson, A.-C. & Henricson, M. (2023). “I am Here”—The Importance of Caring Touch in Intensive Care. A Qualitative Observation and Interview Study. Journal of Holistic Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“I am Here”—The Importance of Caring Touch in Intensive Care. A Qualitative Observation and Interview Study
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Holistic Nursing, ISSN 0898-0101, E-ISSN 1552-5724Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to illuminate the experience of caring touch in intensive care from the perspectives of patients, next-of-kin, and healthcare professionals.

Design and Method: This study was explorative, and data were collected through qualitative observations (n = 9) with subsequent interviews (n = 27) at two general intensive care units. An inductive approach was embraced to be open-minded to the participants’ experiences.

Findings: The results are presented in one generic category—caring touch creates presence—which generated five subcategories: to touch and be touched with respect, touch as guidance and communication, touch causes suffering, touch creates compassion, and touch creates security.

Conclusion: When the ability to communicate with words is lost, it is body language that reveals what a person is trying to express. Nurses create a way of being present with the patients by touching them, to communicate I am here for you. Caring touch is a tool to show compassion and respect and to protect the integrity of the lived body. The caring touch is soothing and comforting for the patient and next-of-kin and creates security. It also helps to awaken the motivation to get healthy, which is needed in an environment that is foreign.

Keywords
adults, group/population, families, touch therapy, intensive care, qualitative content analysis, healthcare professionals
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-30638 (URN)10.1177/08980101231198723 (DOI)001069857900001 ()2-s2.0-85172320146 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-10-19 Created: 2023-10-19 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Tikkanen, V., Arsic, M. & Henricson, M. (2023). The general attributes and competence for nurses in a single responder unit: A modified Delphi study. BMC Emergency Medicine, 23, Article ID 93.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The general attributes and competence for nurses in a single responder unit: A modified Delphi study
2023 (English)In: BMC Emergency Medicine, E-ISSN 1471-227X, Vol. 23, article id 93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract

Aim The aim of this study was to describe the general attributes and competence that nurses in the ambulance’ssingle responder units are considered to need.

Background

The development of ambulance care has led to an increased need for new units and working methods. Single responder unit is a single crewed unit that often uses for the patient assessments, to refer patients to the rightlevel of care and to release regular ambulances. There is a lack of description of the needed competence for thenurses within single responder unit.

Methods

Modified Delphi with three rounds was used. The first round was conducted with focus group interviewsand analysed with content analysis. Five competence categories and 19 subcategories were identified. The secondand third rounds were conducted through surveys using a 4-point Likert scale and analysed with descriptive statistics.

Results

The ability to communicate with other healthcare providers to achieve one’s goal, the ability to create a goodencounter alone and to have appropriate professional experience were identified as the most important generalattributes and competencies.

Conclusions

A central competence in prehospital emergency care is the ability to independently assess and treatpatients with varying care needs in complex environments. To be able to work in SRU requires good communicationand collaborations skills with other healthcare providers but it is also a prerequisite for creating a good patientrelationship. Work experience of taking care of varying patients and situations is also needed in SRU.

Keywords
Ambulance, Communication, Competence, Nurse, Patient safety, Single responder unit
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-31323 (URN)10.1186/s12873-023-00868-w (DOI)001052789100002 ()2-s2.0-85168479064 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Mälardalen University
Available from: 2024-01-16 Created: 2024-01-16 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Lägervik, M., Thörne, K., Fristedt, S., Henricson, M. & Hedberg, B. (2022). Residents’ and supervisors’ experiences when using a feedback-model in post-graduate medical education. BMC Medical Education, 22(1), Article ID 891.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Residents’ and supervisors’ experiences when using a feedback-model in post-graduate medical education
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2022 (English)In: BMC Medical Education, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 891Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Supervisors play a key part as role models and supporting the learning during residents’ post-graduate medical education, but sometimes lack sufficient pedagogic training and are challenged by high demands in today’s healthcare. The aim of this study was to describe the strengths and areas for improvement identified in the supervision process by residents and supervisors in post-graduate medical education.

Methods

This study included supervisors and residents working at departments and health centres who have used a web-based questionnaire, as a part of the Evaluation and Feedback For Effective Clinical Teaching (EFFECT) model, during the period 2016–2019. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were used to analyse ratings and comments to describe strengths and areas for improvement in the supervision process.

Results

The study included 287 resident evaluations of supervisors and 78 self-evaluations by supervisors. The supervisor as a role model, being available, and, giving personal support, were the three most important strengths identified by the residents and supervisors. Residents in primary care also identified the role modelling of general practice competence as a strength, whereas residents and supervisors in hospital departments addressed supervisors as energetic and showing work was fun. The area with the need of most improvement was, Giving and receiving feedback.

Conclusions

To be able to give feedback, residents and supervisors, needed to see each other in work, and the learning environment had to offer time and space to pedagogical processes, like feedback, to improve the learning environment.

National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-29289 (URN)10.1186/s12909-022-03969-5 (DOI)000903523700001 ()2-s2.0-85144637932 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council, Sweden
Available from: 2023-01-13 Created: 2023-01-13 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Henricson, M., Segesten, K., Berglund, A.-L. & Määttä, S. (2009). Enjoying tactile touch and gaining hope when being cared for in intensive care: A phenomenological hermeneutical study. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 25(6), 323-331
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enjoying tactile touch and gaining hope when being cared for in intensive care: A phenomenological hermeneutical study
2009 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 323-331Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Touch has been a part of the healing process in many civilisations and cultures throughout the centuries. Nurses frequently use touch to provide comfort and reach their patients. The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaning of receiving tactile touch when being cared for in an intensive care unit. Tactile touch is a complementary method including the use of effleurage, which means soft stroking movements along the body. The context used to illuminate the meaning of receiving tactile touch was two general intensive care units (ICUs). Six patients, who have been cared for in the two ICUs, participated in the study. A phenomenological–hermeneutical method based on the philosophy of Ricoeur and developed for nursing research by Lindseth and Norberg [Lindseth A, Norberg A. A phenomenological hermeneutical method for researching lived experience. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 2004;18:145–53] was chosen for the analysis. Data consisted of narratives, which were analysed in three recurring phases: naïve understanding, structural analyses and comprehensive understanding. Two main themes were found: being connected to oneself and being unable to gain and maintain pleasure. The comprehensive understanding of receiving tactile touch during intensive care seems to be an expression of enjoying tactile touch and gaining hope for the future. This study reveals that it is possible to experience moments of pleasure in the midst of being a severely ill patient at an ICU and, through this experience also gain hope.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd., 2009
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-2643 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2009.07.001 (DOI)2320/5645 (Local ID)2320/5645 (Archive number)2320/5645 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2017-12-01
Henricson, M. (2008). Tactile touch in intensive care: Nurses’ preparation, patients’ experiences and the effect on stress parameters. (Doctoral dissertation). Högskolan i Borås och Karlstads universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tactile touch in intensive care: Nurses’ preparation, patients’ experiences and the effect on stress parameters
2008 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to acquire knowledge about whether tactile touch as a complementary method can (i) promote comfort and (ii) reduce stress reactions during care in an intensive care unit (ICU) Method: In Paper I, five nurses with a touch therapist training were interviewed about their experiences of preparation before giving tactile touch in an ICU. To analyse the meaning of preparation as a phenomenon, Giorgi’s descriptive phenomenological approach was used. In Paper II and III a randomised controlled trial was set up to investigate the effects of a five-day tactile touch intervention on patients’ oxytocin levels in arterial blood (II), on patients’ blood pressure, heart rate and blood glucose level, and on patients’ levels of anxiety, sedation and alertness (III). Forty-four patients were randomised to either an intervention group (n = 21) or a control group (n = 23). Data were analysed with non-parametric statistics. In Paper IV, six patients who had received the tactile touch intervention were interviewed to illuminate the experience of receiving tactile touch during intensive care. To gain a deeper understanding of the phenomenon and to illuminate the meaning, Ricoeur’s phenomenological hermeneutical method, developed by Lindseth and Norberg, was used. Findings: The nurses need four constituents (inner balance, unconditional respect for the patients’ integrity, a relationship with the patient characterized by reciprocal trust and a supportive environment) to be prepared and go through the transition from nurse to touch therapist (I). In the intervention study, no significant differences were shown for oxytocin levels between intervention and control group over time or within each day (II). There were significantly lower levels of anxiety for patients in the intervention group. There were no significant differences between the intervention and control groups for blood pressure, heart rate, the use of drugs, levels of sedation or blood glucose levels (III). The significance of receiving tactile touch during intensive care was described as the creation of an imagined room along with the touch therapist. In this imagined room, the patients enjoyed tactile touch and gained hope for the future (IV). Conclusion: Nurses needed internal and external balance to be prepared for providing tactile touch. Patients did not notice the surroundings as much as the nurses did. Patients enjoyed the tactile touch and experienced comfort. The impact on stress parameters were limited, except for levels of anxiety which declined significantly. The results gave some evidence for the benefit of tactile touch given to patients in intensive care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Högskolan i Borås och Karlstads universitet, 2008
Series
Skrifter från Högskolan i Borås, ISSN 0280-381X ; 11
Keywords
complementary method, stress, oxytocin, lifeworld research
National Category
Nursing Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-3467 (URN)2320/1814 (Local ID)978-91-85659-15-9 (ISBN)2320/1814 (Archive number)2320/1814 (OAI)
Note

För avläggande av filosofie doktorsexamen i omvårdnad, som med

tillstånd av Fakultetsnämnden vid Fakulteten för samhälls- och livsvetenskaper vid

Karlstads universtitet framläggs till offentlig granskning fredagen den 18 april 2008 kl.10:00

M204, Högskolan i Borås.

Available from: 2015-12-04 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2016-07-13Bibliographically approved
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