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Baldwin, Richard
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Baldwin, R. (2019). Using Video for self- reflection in Teacher Training Education. In: Transforming Teacher Education with Mobile Technologies: . Bloomsbury Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using Video for self- reflection in Teacher Training Education
2019 (English)In: Transforming Teacher Education with Mobile Technologies, Bloomsbury Publishing , 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bloomsbury Publishing, 2019
National Category
Media Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15479 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-10
Baldwin, R. & Apelgren, B.-M. (2018). Can Do and Cannot Do – CEFR inspired examination and assessment in a Swedish higher education context. Apples - Journal of Applied Language Studies., 12(2)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can Do and Cannot Do – CEFR inspired examination and assessment in a Swedish higher education context
2018 (English)In: Apples - Journal of Applied Language Studies., ISSN 1457-9863, Vol. 12, no 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The focus in this paper is on the introduction and implementation of learning outcomes based on the descriptors in the Common European Framework of References for Languages (CEFR). It discusses reaction to the introduction by teacher educators as well as the influence on teacher assessment practice in courses for prospective teachers of English as a foreign language. The paper presents some of the results from a case study concerning changes made in connection with the Bologna process in a department of education within a university college in Sweden. The results show that the adoption of the CEFR descriptors was contested and had a minimal influence on assessment practice. The aim of the paper is to explore possible reasons for the lack of influence, something that was not developed fully in the original case study.

Keywords
Common European Framework of Reference, EFL learners, teacher education, teacher cognition, assessment, case study
National Category
Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15475 (URN)10.17011/apples/urn.201809144127 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-12-17 Created: 2018-12-17 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Baldwin, R. (2017). Using videopapers in teacher education. In: : . Paper presented at NERA 2017 Congress, Copenhagen Denmark, 23-25 March, 2017..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using videopapers in teacher education
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Languages and Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15482 (URN)
Conference
NERA 2017 Congress, Copenhagen Denmark, 23-25 March, 2017.
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Baldwin, R. (2016). Videopapers: A way of bridging the gap between theory and practice in teacher education. In: : . Paper presented at Erasmus+ multiplier conference in Bergen, Norway, September 21-22, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Videopapers: A way of bridging the gap between theory and practice in teacher education
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Media Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15484 (URN)
Conference
Erasmus+ multiplier conference in Bergen, Norway, September 21-22, 2016
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Baldwin, R. (2015). Educational policy enactment. In: : . Paper presented at SRHE Annual Research Conference, Newport, December 9-11, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Educational policy enactment
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15486 (URN)
Conference
SRHE Annual Research Conference, Newport, December 9-11, 2015
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Baldwin, R. & Apelgren, B. M. (2015). Teachers’ and Students’ Thinking and Acting on Changes in Language Teacher Education: A Case Study on Policy Implementation and Enactment. In: Transformative Teacher Research. Theory and Practice for the C21st: . Sense Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teachers’ and Students’ Thinking and Acting on Changes in Language Teacher Education: A Case Study on Policy Implementation and Enactment
2015 (English)In: Transformative Teacher Research. Theory and Practice for the C21st, Sense Publishers, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sense Publishers, 2015
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-8586 (URN)
Available from: 2016-01-15 Created: 2016-01-15 Last updated: 2017-05-04Bibliographically approved
Baldwin, R. (2015). The recontextualisation of the Bologna process in teachereducation. In: : . Paper presented at ECER 2015 Budapest - European Conference on Educational Research, Budapest, Hungary, September 6-10, 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The recontextualisation of the Bologna process in teachereducation
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15489 (URN)
Conference
ECER 2015 Budapest - European Conference on Educational Research, Budapest, Hungary, September 6-10, 2015.
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Baldwin, R. (2013). Changing practice by reform: the recontextualisation of the Bologna process in teacher education. (Doctoral dissertation). Acta universitatis Gothoburgensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing practice by reform: the recontextualisation of the Bologna process in teacher education
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the thesis is to investigate a specific case of curriculum change; that of organizing teacher training courses around learner outcomes in line with the Bologna process. The investigation is an example of a practitioner research case study and looks at how official Bologna policy messages are re-interpreted and recontextualised at the local micro level. A variety of methods are used to collect and analyse the data produced. A form of discourse analysis, as well as a survey of research literature, is used to identify policy discourses connected with the Bologna process. At the local micro level, local documentation as well as teacher talk in planning meetings are analysed to throw light on how the Bologna process was implemented. A number of discourses were found in policy documents; including the need to modernize higher education and to move towards a more student centred approach to learning. The thesis shows that these discourses were mediated locally by a regulative discourse portraying teachers as role models who have the task of passing on knowledge that is essential for the students to obtain before entering the profession. Instead of challenging the pedagogic identities for teachers and students, the introduction of learning outcomes acted to strengthen the fundamental vertical relations between teachers and students, cementing and confirming the level of control that teachers had over all aspects of the curriculum. Changes made in connection with the introduction of learning outcomes had a minimal influence on practice and were contested by some teacher educators. Teacher educators resisted and mediated the changes made by continuing to use their traditional practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Acta universitatis Gothoburgensis, 2013
Series
Gothenburg studies in educational sciences, ISSN 0436-1121 ; 342
Keywords
Bologna, teacher education, policy implementation, recontextualisation, Teacher education and education work
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-3659 (URN)2320/12544 (Local ID)978-91-7346-763-6 (ISBN)978-91-7346-764-3 (ISBN)2320/12544 (Archive number)2320/12544 (OAI)
Note

Akademisk avhandling som med tillstånd av utbildningsvetenskapliga fakulteten vid Göteborgs universitet för vinnande av doktorsexamen i pedagogiskt arbete framläggs till offentlig granskning Fredagen den 20 september, kl. 13.15 vid Högskolan i Borås.

Available from: 2015-12-04 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2016-07-14Bibliographically approved
Baldwin, R. (2010). Student learning outcomes and their influence on a learning culture. Paper presented at Australian Association for Research in Education, AARE 2010 International Education Research Conference - Melbourne, 2010. Paper presented at Australian Association for Research in Education, AARE 2010 International Education Research Conference - Melbourne, 2010.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Student learning outcomes and their influence on a learning culture
2010 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

My paper describes the changes in the focus of my PhD research; from a vague intention to investigate the learning benefits of organising student learning around learning outcomes to a more critical approach investigating the influence of learning outcomes on a learning culture. The research is a form of praxis related enquiry, and concerns a Swedish university level teacher training course for prospective English language teachers, for which I am the course co-ordinator. From July 2007 all higher education degrees in Sweden, as well as in the rest of Europe, have to be expressed through so-called learning outcomes. The introduction of learning outcomes into higher education are a key part of the 1999 Bologna declaration, that emphasises the need to express the knowledge, understanding, competences and other attributes contained within courses and their components. The course concerned was organised around student learning outcomes from the beginning of 2008. The paper outlines my own learning and understanding of the research process and learning culture; from a technical rational approach of trying to “prove” that improvements in student learning had occurred, to a second stage of trying to open up the research process to other stakeholders and then to an understanding of why this “democratisation “ process had only a limited success. The final research stage involves a more critical understanding of the introduction of student learning outcomes when put into the context of the complexities of the local (and global) learning culture. James and Biesta describe learning cultures as the social practices through which people learn, and the combination of the theory of learning cultures and the cultural theory of learning necessitates a different approach towards the improvement of teaching and learning, one which focuses on changing the culture rather than on only one element of it. This involves interpreting the interplay between teaching, teachers, learning, learners, learning situations and wider historical economic social and political influences. While I have only just begun to analyse my data, initial reflections suggest that the introduction of student learning outcomes has only had a limited influence on the local learning culture. Whilst there has been a positive influence on synergy (increasing cooperation and openness between teachers, and also between teachers and learners ) this has had only a limited influence on practice. Other aspects of the learning culture have not been greatly improved. As far as learning opportunities are concerned ( what is allowed, disallowed, encouraged or discouraged in the name of learning) there still exists a culture where examinations tasks tend to encourage the transmission of factual knowledge . Students have very few opportunities to express a critical voice, there has been only a very limited move towards increasing student levels of empowerment; with little or no flexibility for students to decide on the method and content of their studies.

Keywords
Education
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-6466 (URN)2320/7317 (Local ID)2320/7317 (Archive number)2320/7317 (OAI)
Conference
Australian Association for Research in Education, AARE 2010 International Education Research Conference - Melbourne, 2010
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22
Baldwin, R. (2010). Using the CEFR to organise teaching and assessment in teacher training. Paper presented at 11th International CercleS Conference Helsinki. Paper presented at 11th International CercleS Conference Helsinki.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using the CEFR to organise teaching and assessment in teacher training
2010 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The Common European Framework of References for Languages Framework, along with the European Language Portfolio are used increasingly today in all levels of foreign language learning. Research has shown them to have positive effects on language learning. Despite this they have only had a limited use at university level. This paper describes problems involved in trying to use the Framework descriptors as the starting point for organising teaching and assessing teacher trainer students’ language proficiency and suggests that resistance to its use are because of the characteristics of the local learning culture. The results in this paper suggest that the introduction of the Framework descriptors has only had a limited influence on teacher practice. Whilst the learner outcomes connected to the Framework have made more explicit the expectations put on students, traditional views amongst teachers about teaching,learning and assessment mean that there has only been a limited influence on reporting student progress and in making decisions about teaching. These views and practices are closely related to what Bernstein has described as the dominant curriculum model in universities, the disciplinary model; characterized by vertical pedagogic relations between teachers and students, with the rules of selection of curriculum content and of evaluation residing in the hands of the teachers. The transmitter (the teacher) has explicit control and education implies a strong emphasis on students’ acquisitions of theoretical knowledge.These charcteristics are in contrast to the ideas behind the Framework, which are closer to Bernstein’s other curriculum model the vocational model, which emphasises the development of specific skills relevant for specific situations and the ability to combine concepts and skills in practice.

Keywords
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-6386 (URN)2320/6677 (Local ID)2320/6677 (Archive number)2320/6677 (OAI)
Conference
11th International CercleS Conference Helsinki
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22
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