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Adrianson, Lillemor
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Nur’aini A’yuninnisa, R. & Adrianson, L. (2019). Subjective well-being of Indonesian and Swedish collegestudents: A cross-cultural study on happiness. International Journal of Research Studies in Psychology, 8(2), 25-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Subjective well-being of Indonesian and Swedish collegestudents: A cross-cultural study on happiness
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Research Studies in Psychology, ISSN 2243-7681, E-ISSN 2243-769X, ISSN 2243-7681, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 25-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to explore and compare levels of subjective well-being and contributing factors that promote happiness in two countries, Indonesia and Sweden. A total of 104 Swedish and 112 Indonesian college students participated in this study. The instruments used were Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS; Watson, Clark, & Tellegen, 1988), Satisfaction with Life Scale (Diener, Emmons, Larsen, & Griffin, 1985), and an open-ended question, “What are the three most important things in your life that make you happy?” Data analyses were conducted in two phases for qualitative and quantitative data. Two major themes, interdependent and dependent factors of happiness, emerged from the qualitative data. Results showed that respondents from both countries reported interdependent factors as their main happiness contributor. The quantitative result demonstrated no significant effects on subjective well-being for culture and its interaction with the happiness factor. Instead, only the happiness factor had a significant effect on subjective well-being. People with interdependent happiness were happier than those who pursue independent happiness factors. This study observed no difference in the level of subjective well-being and happiness factors across the cultures.

Keywords
happiness; subjective well-being; interdependent happiness; Indonesia; Sweden
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21712 (URN)10.5861/ijrsp.2019.4007 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-09-10 Created: 2019-09-10 Last updated: 2019-09-12Bibliographically approved
Ramdhani, N., Ancok, D. & Adrianson, L. (2017). The Importance of Positive Affect: The Role of Affective Personality in Predicting Organizational Citizenship Behavior. Makara Hubs-Asia, 21(2), 62-69
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Importance of Positive Affect: The Role of Affective Personality in Predicting Organizational Citizenship Behavior
2017 (English)In: Makara Hubs-Asia, ISSN 2355-794X, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 62-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research demonstrates inconsistent results in predicting how affect influences organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). This study aims to solve the inconsistency by taking the position that positive affect and negative affect are orthogonal, and their interaction produces four types of affective personality. They are ‘Self-fulfilling’ (high positive affect and low negative affect), ‘High affective’ (high positive affect and high negative affect), ‘Low affective’ (low positive affect and low negative affect) and ‘Self-destructive’ (low positive affect and high negative affect). The study hypothesizes that the self-fulfilling group displays the highest mean of OCB while the self-destructive displays the lowest. The high affective and low affective groups lie somewhere in between the two groups. The participants of this study were 227 employees, consisting of 151 males and 76 females with ages ranging from 20 to 60 years old (mean=38). They were measured using the Organizational Citizenship Behavior Scale (OCBS) and Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS). Based on the scores of their positive and negative affect dimensions, they were classified into four groups of affective personality types. One-way ANOVA analysis supported the hypothesis. The self-fulfilling group revealed the highest mean of Organizational Citizenship Behavior while the Self-destructive group revealed the lowest. The High affective and Low affective groups were located in between the first two groups. This paper discusses this contribution and highlights how it is potential to explain organizational behavior.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jakarta: , 2017
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13427 (URN)10.7454/mssh.v21i2.3501 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-01-15Bibliographically approved
Gacia, D., Adrianson, L., Archer, T. & Rosenberg, P. (2015). The Dark Side of the Affective  Profiles: Differences and Similarities  in Psychopathy, Machiavellianism,  and Narcissism. SAGE Open, 1-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Dark Side of the Affective  Profiles: Differences and Similarities  in Psychopathy, Machiavellianism,  and Narcissism
2015 (English)In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, ISSN 2158-2440, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The affective profiles model is based on the combination of individuals’ experience of high/low positive affect and high/low negative affect: self-fulfilling, high affective, low affective, and self-destructive. We used the profiles as the backdrop for the investigation of individual differences in malevolent character traits (i.e., the Dark Triad: psychopathy, Machiavellianism, and narcissism). A total of 1,000 participants (age: M = 31.50 SD = 10.27, 667 males and 333 females), recruited through Amazons’ Mechanical Turk (MTurk), responded to the Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule and the Dark Triad Dirty Dozen. Individuals with a high affective profile reported higher degree of narcissism than those with any other profile, and together with individuals with a self-destructive profile, also higher degree of Machiavellianism and psychopathy than individuals with a low affective and self-fulfilling profile. Males scored higher in Machiavellianism and psychopathy. Together with earlier findings, our results show that while individuals in both the self-fulfilling and high affective profiles are extrovert and self-directed, only those in the high affective profile express an immature and malevolent character (i.e., high levels of all Dark Triad traits). Conversely, individuals in the self-fulfilling profile have earlier reported higher levels of cooperativeness and faith. More importantly, the unique association between high levels of positive emotions and narcissism and the unified association between negative emotions to both psychopathy and Machiavellianism imply a dyad rather than a triad of malevolent character traits.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-8304 (URN)10.1177/2158244015615167 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-01-03 Created: 2016-01-03 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Garcia, D., Jimmefors, A., Adrianson, L., Mousavi, F., Rosenberg, P. & Archer, T. (2014). High School Pupils’ Academic Achievement, Self-regulation (Locomotion and Assessment), and Psychological Well-Being. , 2
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High School Pupils’ Academic Achievement, Self-regulation (Locomotion and Assessment), and Psychological Well-Being
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2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Education plays an important role on a personal level because it is related to personal control, a healthy lifestyle, greater income, employment, interpersonal relations, and social support (Mirowsky & Ross, 2003). Self-regulation is the procedure implemented by an individual striving to reach a goal and consists of two inter-related strategies: (1) the identification of the desired out-come and the appraisal of procedures to reach the desired goal (i.e., assessment), and (2) the selection between available approaches to reach the goal and the commitment to the chosen approaches until the goal is reached (i.e., locomotion) (Kruglanski et al, 2000). Self-regulation plays an essential role in academic achievement (Kruglanski et al 1994, 2000). Psychological well-being is a multi-faceted concept composed of six different intra-personal characteristics that describe the fully functional individual (Ryff, 1989). These factors are: positive relationships with others, self-acceptance, environmental mastery, autonomy, purpose in life, and personal growth. We aimed to study the relationship between academic achievement and self-regulation and psychological well-being in Swedish high school pupils. Method: Participants were 160 Swedish high school pupils (111 boys and 49 girls) with an age mean of 17.74 (sd = 1.29). We used the Assessment and Locomotion Scales (Kruglanski et al., 2000) to measure self-regulation and Ryff’s Psychological Well-Being Scales short version (Clark et al., 2001) to measure well-being. Academic achievement was operationalized through pupils’ final grades in Swedish, Mathematics, English, and Physical Education. The courses take place during either one or two semesters and the grading scale ranges from F = fail to A = pass with distinction. Results: Final grades in Swedish were positively related to two psychological well-being scales: self-acceptance and personal growth; and to the self-regulation strategy of assessment. Final grades in Mathematics were positively related to three psychological well-being scales: self-acceptance, autonomy, and personal growth; and also to assessment. Final grades in English were positively related to one psychological well-being scale: personal growth; and also to assessment. Final grades in Physical Education were positively related to four psychological well-being scales: environmental mastery, self-acceptance, autonomy, and personal growth; and also to the self-regulation strategy of locomotion. Conclusions: A profile consisting of assessment orientation combined with self-acceptance and personal growth leads to the best study results. This understanding is important when supporting pupils in achieving the best possible results in school and thus lay the formation for a continued successful life.

Keywords
Academic Achievement, Assessment, Psychological Well-Being, Grades, Self-regulation, Locomotion
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-9400 (URN)10.7287/peerj.preprints.219v1 (DOI)2320/13626 (Local ID)2320/13626 (Archive number)2320/13626 (OAI)
Note

PrePrintsISSN: 2167-9843Volume: 2Issue: 219Publisher: PeerJ, Ltd.

Available from: 2016-03-17 Created: 2016-03-17 Last updated: 2017-05-04
Jimmefors, A., Garcia, D., Rosenberg, P., Fariba, M., Adrianson, L. & Archer, T. (2014). Locomotion (Empowering) and Assessment (Disempowering) Self-regulatory Dimensions as a Function of Affective Profile in High School Students.. International Journal of School and Cognitive Psychology, 2(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Locomotion (Empowering) and Assessment (Disempowering) Self-regulatory Dimensions as a Function of Affective Profile in High School Students.
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2014 (English)In: International Journal of School and Cognitive Psychology, Vol. 2, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the present study was to examine high school adolescent pupils’ self-regulatory strategies in relation to psychological well-being and subjective well-being (i.e., temporal life satisfaction and affect) using the affective profiles model as the backdrop for the analysis. Participants were categorized into Self-fulfilling (high positive, low negative), High affective (high positive, high negative), Low affective (low positive, low negative) and Self-destructive (low positive, high negative) profiles according to their responses on the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule. The participants also self-reported self-regulation (“assessment” and “locomotion”),temporal life satisfaction (past, present and future) and psychological well-being (e.g. Self-acceptance,environmental mastery, personal growth). Self-fulfilling adolescents, in contrast to Self-destructive adolescents, expressed high levels of temporal life satisfaction and psychological well-being. The self-regulatory “locomotion” dimension was associated to high positive affect profiles, higher life satisfaction and psychological well-being whereas the self-regulatory “assessment” dimension was associated with high negative affect profiles, lesser life satisfaction and psychological well-being. Taken together, the well-being outcomes linked to the “locomotion” dimension seem to contribute to an upward ‘spiral of empowerment’, reinforcing approaching or agentic behavior; while the outcome linked to the “assessment” dimension appear to consist of a downward ‘spiral of disempowerment’ or inaction.

Keywords
affective profiles, self-regulation, locomotion, assessment, life satisfaction, well-being
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1854 (URN)10.4172/2469-9837.1000103 (DOI)2320/13673 (Local ID)2320/13673 (Archive number)2320/13673 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2017-08-23
Adrianson, L. & Ramdhani, N. (2014). Why you and not me? Expressions of envy in Indonesia and Sweden.. International Journal of Research Studies in Psychology, 3(3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why you and not me? Expressions of envy in Indonesia and Sweden.
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Research Studies in Psychology, ISSN 2243-7681, E-ISSN 2243-769X, Vol. 3, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the present study was to describe experience of envy in two different cultures, Indonesia and Sweden. Envy is a feeling that most people have experienced and mostly regards as shameful. The concept relates to a variety of feeling that shows its complexity. The result shows that envy had a wider meaning in the Indonesian language than in Swedish, and consisted of emotional words that were rare among the Swedish respondents. The Swedish respondents’ descriptions were, with few exceptions, connected to a malicious (ill will) meaning while it was obvious that the Javanese respondents used also the concept of benign envy (without ill will). Jealousy and envy seemed to overlap each other more in Bahasa Indonesia than in the Swedish use of the words. The latter had a distinct word for schadenfreude that was lacking in Bahasa Indonesia. For the Swedish respondents, wanting to have what another person possesses was a central element of envy, for example prosperity or competence. The Javanese respondents stressed relationships, achievements and personal characteristics’ as main causes for envy. Both the Swedish and Javanese respondents reported that a person who they knew and with whom they had an established relationship, such as a friend or a fellow student, had envied them and the causes for this were about the same as their own.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Consortia Academia Publishing, 2014
Keywords
envy, culture, emotion
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1848 (URN)10.5861/ijrsp.2014.743 (DOI)2320/13627 (Local ID)2320/13627 (Archive number)2320/13627 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2017-12-01
Adrianson, L., Ancok, D., Ramdhani, N. & Archer, T. (2013). Cultural influences upon health, affect, self-esteem and impulsiveness: An Indonesian-Swedish comparison. International Journal of Research Studies in Psychology, 2(3), 25-44
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cultural influences upon health, affect, self-esteem and impulsiveness: An Indonesian-Swedish comparison
2013 (English)In: International Journal of Research Studies in Psychology, ISSN 2243-7681, E-ISSN 2243-769X, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 25-44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study examines several personal attributes that distinguish the personal profiles of individuals, from Indonesian and Swedish cultures, according to self-reports of positive and negative effect, stress and energy, self-esteem, hospital anxiety and depression, dispositional optimism and health. Indonesian participants expressed both more PA and more NA than Swedish participants but less stress and a higher energy-stress quotient than the Swedish participants. Additionally, the former expressed a higher level of optimism and self-esteem, but also more depression, and less impulsiveness than the latter. Younger participants expressed less positive affect and more negative affect and impulsiveness than older participants who expressed both more stress and a higher energy stress quotient. Regression analyses indicated that PA was predicted by optimism and health whereas NA was predicted by anxiety and depression and impulsiveness and counter predicted by health. The present findings are discussed according to the notion of emotional regulation according to which individuals differ in their use of emotion regulation strategies such as reappraisal and suppression, and these individual differences have implications for affect, well-being, and social relationships.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Consortia Academia Publishing, 2013
Keywords
psychology, cultural influences, health, self-esteem, impulsiveness
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1623 (URN)10.5861/ijrsp.2013.228 (DOI)2320/12712 (Local ID)2320/12712 (Archive number)2320/12712 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2018-09-10Bibliographically approved
Barow, T., Gieth, F. & Adrianson, L. (2011). Inkludering och exkludering inom lärarutbildningen. En enkätstudie om lärarstudenternas bakgrund och syn på sina studier. In: : . Paper presented at NERA's 39th Congress, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä (Finland), 12/3/2011.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inkludering och exkludering inom lärarutbildningen. En enkätstudie om lärarstudenternas bakgrund och syn på sina studier
2011 (Swedish)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

INCLUSION AND EXCLUSION IN TEACHER EDUCATION. A QUESTIONNAIRE ON TEACHER STU-DENTS’ BACKGROUND AND PERSPECTIVES ON THEIR STUDIES. In recent years, the increasing heterogeneity among Swedish university students has been widely discussed. ”New” groups of students are entering higher education, such as people with a migration background and/or disability. This development is promoted by efforts of widening participation and the Swedish Anti-Discrimination Act at the policy level. Changes in the student population affect programmes in teacher education in particular. Nowadays, and to a growing extent, more young adults with an educationally disadvantaged family background become teachers. Based on a user perspective, it is the aim of this study to show how these developments influence the students’ view on their studies, determined by usual study tasks such as searching literature, writing papers or passing tests. The research was inspired by Bourdieu and Passeron’s concept of social reproduction, and by Luhmann’s approach of inclusion and exclusion. A questionnaire was distributed to 316 teacher students. Data on social origin, earlier school experiences, and the current perceived educational situation were gathered and statistically analyzed. Several significant variances on the students’ social and academic background and their perceived situation at the university were found. The mothers’ social and educational background was of high relevance for students’ experiences of their ongoing education at the university. Moreover, the perception of failure in schools had a negative impact on the students view about their current studies. In a wider perspective, the results underline the difficulties in overcoming social reproduction and exclusion by means of education. These findings raise questions on how universities can cope with the increasing diversity of their students.

Keywords
teacher education, sweden, inclusion, exclusion, widening participation, social reproduction, Teacher Education
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-6710 (URN)2320/10056 (Local ID)2320/10056 (Archive number)2320/10056 (OAI)
Conference
NERA's 39th Congress, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä (Finland), 12/3/2011
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22 Last updated: 2016-11-18Bibliographically approved
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