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Olausson, Sepideh
Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Sundberg, F., Fridh, I., Olausson, S. & Lindahl, B. (2019). Room Design - A Phenomenological-Hermeneutical Study: A Factor in Creating a Caring Environment.. Critical Care Nursing Quarterly, 42(3), 265-277, Article ID 31135477.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Room Design - A Phenomenological-Hermeneutical Study: A Factor in Creating a Caring Environment.
2019 (English)In: Critical Care Nursing Quarterly, ISSN 0887-9303, E-ISSN 1550-5111, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 265-277, article id 31135477Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Medical technology has progressed tremendously over the last few decades, but the same development cannot be seen in the design of these intensive care unit environments. Authors report results of a study of evidence-based room design, emphasizing the impact on conveying a caring attitude to patients. Ten nonparticipant observations were conducted in patient rooms with 2 different designs, followed by interviews. The data were analyzed using a phenomenological-hermeneutical approach. The results did not reveal that it was obvious that redesigned spaces resulted in a more caring attitude. The meanings of caring displayed during nursing activities were interpreted by interpreting gazes. Some of the nursing staff had an instrumental gaze, interpreted as caring with a task-orientated approach, while others communicated their caring with an attentive and attuned gaze, where the needs of the patients regulated the working shift. The study findings indicated that caring may not be perceived when nurses use a task-oriented approach. However, when nurses practice a person-centered approach, using an attentive and attuned gaze, caring is conveyed. Caring in intensive care contexts needs to be assisted by a supportive environment design that cultivates the caring approach.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
USA: Wolters Kluwer, 2019
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21134 (URN)10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000267 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521-2013-969
Available from: 2019-05-31 Created: 2019-05-31 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Gabre, M., Wireklint Sundström, B. & Olausson, S. (2018). 'A little good with the bad': Newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients' perspectives onself-care: A phenomenological approach. Nordic journal of nursing research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'A little good with the bad': Newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients' perspectives onself-care: A phenomenological approach
2018 (English)In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increased knowledge is needed about what self-care means from the patients’ perspective, especially since the patient population with type 2 diabetes has been rising. The aim was to describe self-care, as experienced by patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. This study adopted a phenomenological approach. Eight patients were interviewed. A combination of photos and interviews were used. The essential meaning of self-care was found to be an existential struggle that evokes feelings of being in-between one’s old unhealthy life and a new healthier one. In this in-between condition, tension exits between contradictorily emotions of anxiety, hopelessness and hope. This struggle also means questioning one’s identity. It is important that diabetes nurses create an opening for reflection and dare to challenge their patients to reflect on this existential struggle.

Keywords
lived experiences, newly diagnosed, phenomenology, reflective lifeworld research, self-care, type 2 diabetes
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14344 (URN)10.1177/2057158518775319 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-06-19 Created: 2018-06-19 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Olausson, S. (2014). Intensivvårdsrummets betydelse för vårdande och välbefinnande: patienters närståendes och vårdpersonalens erfarenheter. (Doctoral dissertation). Linnéuniversitetet: Institutionen för hälso- och vårdvetenskap
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intensivvårdsrummets betydelse för vårdande och välbefinnande: patienters närståendes och vårdpersonalens erfarenheter
2014 (Swedish)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Alternative title[en]
The meanings of ICU patient room as a place of care from the perspective of patients next of kin and staff
Abstract [en]

Aim: The overall aim of the thesis was to illuminate the meanings of intensive care units’ patient rooms as a place of care for critically ill patients and their loved ones. Moreover, it was aimed to develop photovoice as a data collection method for research in ICU context. Methods and materials: Data has been collected using photovoice methodology in combination with research interviews for all three empirical studies. In total 37 people participated. Nine patients, fourteen loved ones and fourteen nurses from three ICU settings. Study I examined the perspective of loved ones, for this purpose a phenomenological hermeneutic method rooted in the philosophy of Ricoeur was chosen. Study II and III examined patients’ respectively nurses’ perspective. Both studies are phenomenologically orientated guided by a reflective lifeworld approach rooted in continental philosophy. Study IV is a theoretical paper focusing on employing photovoice as a data collection method in ICU context. Main findings: The tone and touch of caring is vital for how ICU patient room is materialized for patients. The interior design and furnishing has a great impact on the wellbeing of the loved ones and also the support they can offer the critically ill patient. One major finding is that the ICU patient room is a taken for granted place for health care providers and the impact of it upon caring, patients’ and loved ones wellbeing is not reflected over. It also seems unclear who is responsible for the environment of ICU once it has been built. The environment of ICU affects nurses’ ability to care for the patients and their family in a genuine way and to promote their wellbeing during a fragile time in life. Conclusions: There is an urgent need to translate research findings into clinical practice in order to improve the environment of ICU patient rooms. There is also need of further research and policies for transforming the hostile environment of the patient rooms to a healing environment more conductive to people’s recovering process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linnéuniversitetet: Institutionen för hälso- och vårdvetenskap, 2014
Series
Linnaeus University dissertations ; 176
Keywords
Intensive care, patient rooms, lived experiences, patients, staff, next of kin, phenomenology, hermeneutics, photovoice, caring, Vårdvetenskap
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-3697 (URN)2320/13712 (Local ID)978-91-87427-90-9 (ISBN)2320/13712 (Archive number)2320/13712 (OAI)
Note

Akademisk avhandling som för avläggande av filosofie doktorsexamen vid Linnéuniversitetet försvaras vid offentlig disputation, 13 juni 2014, klockan 14.00 i sal Wicksell, Hus K, Växjö

Available from: 2015-12-04 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2016-08-19Bibliographically approved
Olausson, S., Lindahl, B. & Ekebergh, M. (2013). A phenomenological study of being cared for in a critical care setting: The meanings of the patient room as a place of care.. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 29(4), 234-243
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A phenomenological study of being cared for in a critical care setting: The meanings of the patient room as a place of care.
2013 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 234-243Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Summary Previous research highlights the impact of care and treatment in ICUs on the patient recovery process and wellbeing. However, little is known about how the interior design in the ICU settings may affect patients’ wellbeing. Objective The aim of this study is, by using a lifeworld perspective, to reveal the meanings of the ICU settings as a place of care. Design Nine patients from three ICUs in Sweden participated. Data were collected using photo-voice methodology and were analysed using a reflective lifeworld phenomenological approach. Results The ICU setting as a place of care for critically ill patients is a complex and multidimensional phenomenon. The place is constituted of patients, staff and technical equipment. The struggle for life and occurrences taking place there determine how the room is perceived. The tone and touch of caring together with interior design are fundamental for the room as lived. The room is experienced in various moods; a place of vulnerability, a place inbetween, a place of trust and security, a life-affirming place, a place of tenderness and care and an embodied place. Conclusion Promoting patients’ well-being and satisfaction of care involves integrating a good design and a caring attitude and paying attention to patients’ needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Churchill Livingstone, 2013
Keywords
Intensive care units, Patient room, Hospital design, Qualitative studies, Phenomenology, Hållbar vårdutveckling
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Integrated Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1780 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2013.02.002 (DOI)23727137 (PubMedID)2320/13245 (Local ID)2320/13245 (Archive number)2320/13245 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Olausson, S., Engwall, M. & Johansson, L. (2012). Evidenced-based and sustainable design in a high tech hospital environment: a challenge for the future. In: : . Paper presented at Chalmers Conferences, ARCH12, Gothenburg, Swweden, 14-15 November 2012.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evidenced-based and sustainable design in a high tech hospital environment: a challenge for the future
2012 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Intensive care unit (ICU) is the place of care for the most critically ill patients in hospitals. According to previous research the ICU environment can have a negative impact on the patients’ recovery process. Critical illness together with constant nursing activities, strong lightning and noise especially in patient’s room are believed to affect patients’ physiological parameters and wellbeing negatively. Research has addressed the role of the environment in relation to the development of the most common side-effect of care in ICU, namely ICU delirium. In addition, there is a limited access to single rooms in Swedish ICUs. This means that patients with various diagnoses, gender and age are treated together in the same room. Moreover, as many ICUs in Sweden are aged and in need of renewals, in order to meet the demand of contemporary intensive care, several restoration projects are planned in the following years. Aspects mentioned above have raised questions about how an intervention of the physical environment in an ICU could benefit the patients and their families. A literature search showed that there is little research about the impact of the physical environment on patients’ health in this context and that there is a lack of reliable long term studies focusing on the relationship between the physical environment, health and recovery. Therefore this project was initiated by two experienced researchers, Professor I, Bergbom at the University of Gothenburg and Associate professor B, Lindahl at the University College of Borås, with the purpose to investigate if an intervention in the physical environment in an ICU patient room can improve patients’ recovery process and wellbeing. The project has an exploratory and descriptive design. The intervention is located at an ICU, in Western Sweden and implicates a rebuilt patient room. The refurbished room (experimental room) is equipped with sound absorbents behind the walls and ceiling, a cycled lighting system and a new interior decoration. An identical room has remained intact (control room), which makes it possible to compare data from two different environments. All research questions will be related to the sound environment, the light environment and the esthetic layout. The results from this project will be useful in the context of ICU, but also in other high tech environments. The aim of this paper is to provide a description of the intervention project and present findings generated from a sound environment study.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Integrated Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-6919 (URN)2320/11837 (Local ID)2320/11837 (Archive number)2320/11837 (OAI)
Conference
Chalmers Conferences, ARCH12, Gothenburg, Swweden, 14-15 November 2012
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22 Last updated: 2017-10-12Bibliographically approved
Suserud, B.-O., Halabi, J., Abdalrahim, M., Olausson, S. & Lepp, M. (2012). Learning Through Drama in th Field of Global Nursing. In: : . Paper presented at 23rd International Nursing Research Congress, Brisbane, Australia.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning Through Drama in th Field of Global Nursing
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2012 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Integrated Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-6915 (URN)2320/11819 (Local ID)2320/11819 (Archive number)2320/11819 (OAI)
Conference
23rd International Nursing Research Congress, Brisbane, Australia
Note

http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/

Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22 Last updated: 2017-10-14Bibliographically approved
Olausson, S., Lindahl, B., Ekebergh, M. & Almerud Österberg, S. (2012). Patient safety in relation to the design of the patient rooms in Intensive Care Units: Staff’s lived experiences of their working environment in high technological settings. Paper presented at NOVO symposium 'Sustainable Health Care: Continuous Improvement of Processes and Systems' 15-16 November 2012, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm. Paper presented at NOVO symposium 'Sustainable Health Care: Continuous Improvement of Processes and Systems' 15-16 November 2012, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient safety in relation to the design of the patient rooms in Intensive Care Units: Staff’s lived experiences of their working environment in high technological settings
2012 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Integrated Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-6920 (URN)2320/11854 (Local ID)2320/11854 (Archive number)2320/11854 (OAI)
Conference
NOVO symposium 'Sustainable Health Care: Continuous Improvement of Processes and Systems' 15-16 November 2012, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22
Olausson, S., Lindahl, B. & Ekebergh, M. (2012). The ICU patient room: Views and meanings as experienced by the next of kin: A phenomenological hermeneutical study. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 28(3), 176-184
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ICU patient room: Views and meanings as experienced by the next of kin: A phenomenological hermeneutical study
2012 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 176-184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The rooms in Intensive Care Units are considered as high-tech environments and believed to affect recovery process and wellbeing of patients. Moreover, the design and interiors affect the interplay between the patient and the next of kin. Objective The aim of this study was to describe and interpret the meanings of the intensive care patient room as experienced by next of kin. Design Next of kin (n = 14) from two different intensive care units participated. Data were collected through photo-voice and analysed using aphenomenological hermeneutical method. Results Three major themes emerged; dwelling in the room and time, becoming at home and extension of the room. The results show that the room is perceived as a lived and extended place and space. The design, interiors and furnishing in the patient room are fundamental in shaping the next of kin's experiences in the room and affect wellbeing. Conclusions How intensive care patient rooms are designed, the place given to next of kin and the way they are received in the room are decisive for the support given to the loved one. Simple interventions can make the patient room a more healing environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Churchill Livingstone, Elsevier, 2012
Keywords
intensive care units, patient room, hospital design, family, qualitative studies, Platsen och rummets betydelse för vårdandet
National Category
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Research subject
Integrated Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1283 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2011.12.003 (DOI)22397997 (PubMedID)2320/10798 (Local ID)2320/10798 (Archive number)2320/10798 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Olausson, S., Lindahl, B. & Ekebergh, M. (2011). Giving voice to loved ones: Using photo-voice as a data collection method in ICU. Paper presented at EfCCNa: European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations - working together achiving more, Köpenhamn, 24-26 mars 2011. Paper presented at EfCCNa: European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations - working together achiving more, Köpenhamn, 24-26 mars 2011.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Giving voice to loved ones: Using photo-voice as a data collection method in ICU
2011 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is a place of care for the most critically ill patients. The ICU rooms are considered to be one of the most complicated rooms to design. Providing successful intensive care requires that human, technologies and spatial resources are integrated in a rigorous way. Research shows that being a patient or next-of-kin in ICU is a traumatic experience not only because of the illness but also because of one’s human existence is threatened. Literature suggests that the presence of next-of-kin and the design of ICU affect the patients’ recovery and wellbeing.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Integrated Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-6726 (URN)2320/10193 (Local ID)2320/10193 (Archive number)2320/10193 (OAI)
Conference
EfCCNa: European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations - working together achiving more, Köpenhamn, 24-26 mars 2011
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22
Lepp, M., Jehad, H., Olausson, S. & Suserud, B.-O. (2011). Learning Through Drama in the Field of Global Nursing. Applied Theatre Researcher (12), 1-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning Through Drama in the Field of Global Nursing
2011 (English)In: Applied Theatre Researcher, ISSN 1443-1726, no 12, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores how nurses (nurse educators, and doctoral and masters students) from three countries experienced learning through drama in the field of nursing education. In this era of internationalisation, there is an urgent need to prepare nurses with global perspectives. This qualitative study builds on the fourteen participants’ involvement in a drama workshop and their related reflective journals, which were the subject of a quality content analysis. Two categories and five sub-categories emerged in the analysis of the participants’ journals. This study has implications for nursing education and curriculum activities in nursing programs related to the preparation of nurses with a global perspective using drama as core pedagogy. Through drama, participants can access their lifeworlds and share them with one another. Drama makes the experience-based knowledge visible, and in addition develops knowledge about a certain topic depending on the group’s background and contribution.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Center for Applied Theatre Researcher, 2011
Keywords
international exchange, applied drama/theatre, drama, global nursing, international education
National Category
Nursing Nursing
Research subject
Integrated Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1250 (URN)2320/10296 (Local ID)2320/10296 (Archive number)2320/10296 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2017-12-10Bibliographically approved
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