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Ferreira, Jorge
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Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Gmoser, R., Ferreira, J., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Lennartsson, P. R. (2019). Post-treatment of Fungal Biomass to Enhance Pigment Production. Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Post-treatment of Fungal Biomass to Enhance Pigment Production
2019 (English)In: Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology, ISSN 0273-2289, E-ISSN 1559-0291Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A new post-treatment method of fungal biomass after fermentation is revealed. The post-treatment strategy was utilized to produce pigments as an additional valuable metabolite. Post-treatment included incubation at 95% relative humidity where the effects of harvesting time, light, and temperature were studied. Pigment-producing edible filamentous fungus Neurospora intermedia cultivated on ethanol plant residuals produced 4 g/L ethanol and 5 g/L fungal biomass. Harvesting the pale biomass after 48 h submerged cultivation compared to 24 h or 72 h increased pigmentation in the post-treatment step with 35% and 48%, respectively. The highest pigment content produced, 1.4 mg/g dry fungal biomass, was obtained from washed biomass treated in light at 35 °C whereof the major impact on pigmentation was from washed biomass. Moreover, post-treated biomass contained 50% (w/w) crude protein. The post-treatment strategy successfully adds pigments to pre-obtained biomass. The pigmented fungal biomass can be considered for animal feed applications for domestic animals.

Keywords
Pigments, Neurospora intermedia, Carotenoids, Edible filamentous fungi, Post-treatment
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21568 (URN)10.1007/s12010-019-02961-y (DOI)2-s2.0-85064279196 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-07
Tadesse Abate, M., Ferri, A., Guan, J., Chen, G., Ferreira, J. & Nierstrasz, V. (2019). Single-step disperse dyeing and antimicrobial functionalization of polyester fabric with chitosan and derivative in supercritical carbon dioxide. Journal of Supercritical Fluids, 147, 231-240
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Single-step disperse dyeing and antimicrobial functionalization of polyester fabric with chitosan and derivative in supercritical carbon dioxide
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Supercritical Fluids, ISSN 0896-8446, E-ISSN 1872-8162, Vol. 147, p. 231-240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, a novel green approach was adopted to develop antimicrobial polyester fabric using sustainable biopolymers (chitosan/derivative) as eco-friendly antimicrobial agents via the resource efficient supercritical CO2 (scCO2) dyeing route in a single step. Polyester fabric was dyed with a small amount of dye (0.4% owf) in the presence of chitosan/derivative (3% owf) in scCO2 at 120 °C, 25 MPa for 1 h. The success of chitosan/derivative impregnation was confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Zeta Potential (ζ), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Water Contact Angle (WCA) measurements. According to the result, excellent color strength and fastness properties were obtained and the treated samples also reduced 75 − 93% of Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) bacteria within one hour. This suggests that the dye and chitosan/derivative had no adverse effect on each other, proving compatibility. This new approach would help to reduce the cost of production and environmental pollution associated with the conventional textile finishing processes.

Keywords
Antimicrobial agents, Biopolymers, Carbon dioxide, Chitosan, Color fastness, Contact angle, Dyeing, Escherichia coli, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy; Textile finishing, Antimicrobial functionalization; Cost of productions; Environmental pollutions; Fastness properties; Fourier transform infrared; Supercritical carbon dioxides; Supercritical CO2 (scCO2); Water contact angle (WCA), Supercritical fluid extraction
National Category
Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15882 (URN)10.1016/j.supflu.2018.11.002 (DOI)000462690700026 ()2-s2.0-85056637783 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-04-11Bibliographically approved
Ferreira, J., Brancoli, P., Agnihotri, S., Bolton, K. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2018). A review of integration strategies of lignocelluloses and other wastes in 1st generation bioethanol processes. Process Biochemistry, 75, 173-186
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A review of integration strategies of lignocelluloses and other wastes in 1st generation bioethanol processes
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2018 (English)In: Process Biochemistry, ISSN 1359-5113, E-ISSN 1873-3298, Vol. 75, p. 173-186Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

First-generation ethanol plants offer successful, commercial-scale bioprocesses that can, at least partially, replace fossil fuels. They can act as platforms to integrate lignocelluloses, wastes and residuals when establishing 2nd generation ethanol. The present review gathers recent insights on the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic substrates into lot generation ethanol plants, through microbial conversion or cogeneration systems. It shows that, among different lot generation ethanol plants, sugar-based ethanol by-products, dominate integration studies characterized by strong techno-economic and life-cycle assessment components. In comparison, there are fewer studies that focus on grain-derived lignocellulosic residuals and other wastes. There is consensus that integrating second generation feedstocks into first generation plants can have positive techno-economic and environmental impacts. In addition to realizing production of ethanol from 2nd generation feedstocks, these possibilities can impact waste management by establishing relevant biorefineries and circular economy. They can also supply a wide range of renewable products. Considering the potential of this waste management strategy, further research on these and many other substrates is needed. This will shed light on the effect of the integration, the relevant types of microorganisms and pretreatments, and of other physical parameters on the effectiveness of running lot generation plants with integrated second generation feedstocks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2018
Keywords
biorefinery, filamentous fungi, 1st generation ethanol, 2nd dgeneration ethanol, lignocelluloses, wastes
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15617 (URN)10.1016/j.procbio.2018.09.006 (DOI)000453624000021 ()2-s2.0-85053840376 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved
Thunuguntla, R., Mahboubi, A., Ferreira, J. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2018). Integration of Membrane Bioreactors with Edible Filamentous Fungi for Valorization of Expired Milk. , 10(6)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integration of Membrane Bioreactors with Edible Filamentous Fungi for Valorization of Expired Milk
2018 (English)Other (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Around 29 million tons of milk end as waste yearly in Europe, representing an environmental issue but also a potential substrate for biological valorization given its nutritional value. Aspergillus oryzae and Neurospora intermedia are edible filamentous fungi with dissimilar metabolism when grown in expired milk. Neurospora intermedia is more devoted to lactose consumption; 68 and 57% of lactose was consumed after cultivation in expired milk and its liquid fraction, respectively. Aspergillus oryzae consumed less lactose in expired milk (14%), but led to better microfiltration characteristics of the final effluent due to fat and protein degradation. A two-stage fed-batch cultivation using membrane bioreactors (MBRs) was developed, bringing together both fungal metabolic characteristics when grown in 70% diluted expired milk. In the first MBR, A.oryzae degraded fat and protein, improved microfiltration, and produced ca 11 g/L of biomass. In the second MBR, N. intermedia consumed the remaining lactose in the permeate and originated ca 7 g/L of biomass. The developed system was successful for valorization of non-sterile milk due to the balance between consumption of bacterial growth-derived acids, consequent pH, and fungal enzymatic activities. Besides, a final clear effluent (83% reduction of COD) was obtained, which is of interest considering wastewater treatment.

Keywords
ethanol, expired milk, edible filamentous fungi, fat degradation, fungal biomass, lactose consumption, membrane bioreactors, microfiltration, protein degradation, two-stage cultivation
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15218 (URN)10.3390/su10061940 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-10-31 Created: 2018-10-31 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Lennartsson, P. R., Ferreira, J. A., Taherzadeh, M. J., Lundin, M. & Gmoser, R. (2018). Pigment Production by the Edible Filamentous Fungus Neurospora Intermedia. Fermentation, 4(11), 1-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pigment Production by the Edible Filamentous Fungus Neurospora Intermedia
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2018 (English)In: Fermentation, ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 4, no 11, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The production of pigments by edible filamentous fungi is gaining attention as a result of the increased interest in natural sources with added functionality in the food, feed, cosmetic, pharmaceutical and textile industries. The filamentous fungus Neurospora intermedia, used for production of the Indonesian food “oncom”, is one potential source of pigments. The objective of the study was to evaluate the fungus’ pigment production. The joint effect from different factors (carbon and nitrogen source, ZnCl2, MgCl2 and MnCl2) on pigment production by N. intermedia is reported for the first time. The scale-up to 4.5 L bubble column bioreactors was also performed to investigate the effect of pH and aeration. Pigment production of the fungus was successfully manipulated by varying several factors. The results showed that the formation of pigments was strongly influenced by light, carbon, pH, the co-factor Zn2+ and first- to fourth-order interactions between factors. The highest pigmentation (1.19 ± 0.08 mg carotenoids/g dry weight biomass) was achieved in a bubble column reactor. This study provides important insights into pigmentation of this biotechnologically important fungus and lays a foundation for future utilizations of N. intermedia for pigment production. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: , 2018
Keywords
pigments; neurospora intermedia; carotenoids; edible filamentous fungi; ascomycetes
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13654 (URN)10.3390/fermentation4010011 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-02-14 Created: 2018-02-14 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Ferreira, J. A., Lennartsson, P. R. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2017). Airlift bioreactors for fish feed fungal biomass production using edible filamentous fungi. In: : . Paper presented at FFBiotech Symposium, Villeneuve, May 15-16, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Airlift bioreactors for fish feed fungal biomass production using edible filamentous fungi
2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Airlift bioreactors are generally considered to be better alternatives for cultivation of filamentous fungi in comparison to stirred-tank bioreactors or bubble columns bioreactors. The reason for the former includes fungal growth around all internal parts including impellers, baffles or pH, temperature and oxygen probes limiting mass transfer, whereas the latter is limited by air flow rates that can be applied before the system provides deficient mixing and so mass transfer rates. Spent sulphite liquor, a by-product from the paper pulp industry, was used for cultivation of edible Rhizopus sp., a strain isolated from Indonesian tempeh used as human food, using a 26 L airlift bioreactor. Increasing the aeration rate from 0.15 to 1 vvm led to increased biomass production (1 vs 7 g/L). The aeration rate was also found to influence fungal morphology and metabolite production during batch cultivation. Rhizopus sp. shifted from mycelial suspensions at 0.15 and 0.5 vvm to small compact pellets of regular size at 1 vvm. The production of ethanol and lactic acid, a proof of sub-optimal aeration conditions, was also reduced when increasing the aeration rate from 0.15 to 1 vvm. The produced biomass was found to be composed, on a dry weight basis, of 30-50% protein, 2-7% lipids, and 3-9% glucosamine. Considering the edible character of the fungus used as well as its biomass nutritional characteristics, there is a potential for its use as fishmeal replacement within the increasing aquaculture sector.

Keywords
Biomass, Edible filamentous fungi, Rhizopus sp
National Category
Chemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12205 (URN)
Conference
FFBiotech Symposium, Villeneuve, May 15-16, 2017
Available from: 2017-06-07 Created: 2017-06-07 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Ferreira, J. A., Lennartsson, P. R. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2017). Airlift bioreactors for fish feed fungal biomass production using edible filamentous fungi. In: FFBiotech Symposium, University of Lille, Villeneuve d'Ascq, France: . Paper presented at FFBiotech Symposium, Villeneuve d'Ascq, May 15-16, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Airlift bioreactors for fish feed fungal biomass production using edible filamentous fungi
2017 (English)In: FFBiotech Symposium, University of Lille, Villeneuve d'Ascq, France, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12527 (URN)
Conference
FFBiotech Symposium, Villeneuve d'Ascq, May 15-16, 2017
Available from: 2017-08-27 Created: 2017-08-27 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Brancoli, P., Ferreira, J. A., Bolton, K. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2017). Changes in carbon footprint when integrating production of filamentous fungi in 1st generation ethanol plants. Bioresource Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in carbon footprint when integrating production of filamentous fungi in 1st generation ethanol plants
2017 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Integrating the cultivation of edible filamentous fungi in the thin stillage from ethanol production is presently being considered. This integration can increase the ethanol yield while simultaneously producing a new value-added protein-rich biomass that can be used for animal feed. This study uses life cycle assessment to determine the change in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions when integrating the cultivation of filamentous fungi in ethanol production. The result shows that the integration performs better than the current scenario when the fungal biomass is used as cattle feed for system expansion and when energy allocation is used. It performs worse if the biomass is used as fish feed. Hence, integrating the cultivation of filamentous fungi in 1st generation ethanol plants combined with proper use of the fungi can lead to a reduction of GHG emissions which, considering the number of existing ethanol plants, can have a significant global impact.

Keywords
Carbon footprint, Feed products, Life cycle assessment, Ethanol
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13418 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2017.10.085 (DOI)000425764100138 ()2-s2.0-85033665779 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-11-29Bibliographically approved
Nair, R. B., Kalif, M., Ferreira, J. A., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Lennartsson, P. R. (2017). Mild-temperature dilute acid pretreatment for integration of first and second generation ethanol processes. Bioresource Technology, 245, 145-151
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mild-temperature dilute acid pretreatment for integration of first and second generation ethanol processes
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2017 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 245, p. 145-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The use of hot-water (100 °C) from the 1st generation ethanol plants for mild-temperature lignocellulose pretreatment can possibly cut down the operational (energy) cost of 2nd generation ethanol process, in an integrated model. Dilute-sulfuric and -phosphoric acid pretreatment at 100 °C was carried out for wheat bran and whole-stillage fibers. Pretreatment time and acid type influenced the release of sugars from wheat bran, while acid-concentration was found significant for whole-stillage fibers. Pretreatment led up-to 300% improvement in the glucose yield compared to only-enzymatically treated substrates. The pretreated substrates were 191–344% and 115–300% richer in lignin and glucan, respectively. Fermentation using Neurospora intermedia, showed 81% and 91% ethanol yields from wheat bran and stillage-fibers, respectively. Sawdust proved to be a highly recalcitrant substrate for mild-temperature pretreatment with only 22% glucose yield. Both wheat bran and whole-stillage are potential substrates for pretreatment using waste heat from the 1st generation process for 2nd generation ethanol.

Keywords
Bioethanol, Edible filamentous fungi, Lignocelluloses, Mild temperature pretreatment, Neurospora intermedia
National Category
Bioenergy Bioprocess Technology Chemical Process Engineering
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12931 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2017.08.125 (DOI)000412443500018 ()2-s2.0-85028936794 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-26 Created: 2017-10-26 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Mahboubi, A., Ferreira, J. A., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Lennartsson, P. R. (2017). Production of Fungal Biomass for Feed, Fatty Acids, and Glycerol by Aspergillus oryzae from Fat-Rich Dairy Substrates. Fermentation, 3(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Production of Fungal Biomass for Feed, Fatty Acids, and Glycerol by Aspergillus oryzae from Fat-Rich Dairy Substrates
2017 (English)In: Fermentation, ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 3, no 4Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Dairy waste is a complex mixture of nutrients requiring an integrated strategy for valorization into various products. The present work adds insights into the conversion of fat-rich dairy products into biomass, glycerol, and fatty acids via submerged cultivation with edible filamentous fungi. The pH influenced fat degradation, where Aspergillus oryzae lipase was more active at neutral than acidic pH (17 g/L vs. 0.5 g/L of released glycerol); the same trend was found during cultivation in crème fraiche (12 g/L vs. 1.7 g/L of released glycerol). In addition to glycerol, as a result of fat degradation, up to 3.6 and 4.5 g/L of myristic and palmitic acid, respectively, were released during A. oryzae growth in cream. The fungus was also able to grow in media containing 16 g/L of lactic acid, a common contaminant of dairy waste, being beneficial to naturally increase the initial acidic pH and trigger fat degradation. Considering that lactose consumption is suppressed in fat-rich media, a two-stage cultivation for conversion of dairy waste is also proposed in this work. Such an approach would provide biomass for possibly feed or human consumption, fatty acids, and an effluent of low organic matter tackling environmental and social problems associated with the dairy sector.

Keywords
biomass for feed, dairy waste, edible filamentous fungi, fatty acids, glycerol
National Category
Environmental Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12753 (URN)10.3390/fermentation3040048 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-09-28 Created: 2017-09-28 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
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