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Jansen, Barbara
Publications (10 of 11) Show all publications
Jansen, B. (2015). Composing over time, temporal patterns: in Textile Design. (Doctoral dissertation). Högskolan i Borås
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Composing over time, temporal patterns: in Textile Design
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

The work presented in this thesis investigates through practice a new field of textile design exploring the visual effects of moving light as a continuous time-based medium. Thereby, the textile design pattern reveals its composition, not in one moment of time any more, but in fact over time. The thesis consist of four parts: a solo exhibition at the Textile Museum in Borås from 17th February- 28th March 2015, five posters, an interactive thesis including 48 films (download file) and present thesis book. The artefacts displayed in the thesis show a varying range of examples which explore aesthetical possibilities of how light can be integrated as an active part into textile structures, ranging from weaving to braiding techniques, both hand crafted, as well as industrial produced. Thereby three main groups of experiments: colour flow, rhythm exercise, sound_light experiment explore and discuss a range of different time-based expressions. Thus define and establish relevant new design variables and notions, whilst working with time-based design processes. In the following descriptions of these experiments two forms of writing have been used to describe the experiments. One is purely descriptive, neutral form to describe the experiments as such, whereas text titled Research Diary Notes includes reflections and personal comments on the experiences during work on the experiments. The interactive thesis and the exhibited artefacts are an invitation to view new textiles expressions and are an initial guide on the road toward future time-based design works, particularly in the area of light emitting textiles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Högskolan i Borås, 2015
Series
University of Borås studies in artistic research ; 12
Keywords
temporal patterns, textile design, Textiles and fashion
National Category
Other Humanities Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-3721 (URN)2320/14360 (Local ID)978-91-87525-33-9 (ISBN)978-91-87525-34-6 (ISBN)2320/14360 (Archive number)2320/14360 (OAI)
Note

Disputationen sker den 17:e mars 2015, kl. 10-12 i Textilmuséet, Textilhögskolan, Skaraborgsvägen 3, Borås. Opponent: Dr Nithikul Nimkulrat, Professor i textildesign, Head of Department of Textile Design, Estonian Academy of Arts.

Disputationen genomförs på engelska.

Available from: 2015-12-04 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2016-07-14Bibliographically approved
Jansen, B. (2015). Temporal patterns.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Temporal patterns
2015 (English)Other (Other academic) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

This exhibition investigates a new field of textile design. It explores the visual effects of movement using light as a continuous time-based medium. Thereby, the textile design pattern reveals its composition, not in one moment of time any more, but in fact over time. 

The textiles displayed show a varying range of examples which explore aesthetic possibilities of how light can be integrated as an active part into textile structures. Thereby ranging from weaving, to knitting and braiding techniques, both hand crafted, as well as industrial produced.

Exhibition: temporal patterns by Barbara Jansen, 17th February - 29th March 2015Exhibition host: Textile Museum, Skaraborgsvägen 3A, Borås, Sweden, www.textilmuseet.se

National Category
Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-257 (URN)
Available from: 2015-06-24 Created: 2015-06-24 Last updated: 2015-12-18
Jansen, B. (2014). rhythm exercise. Paper presented at Shapeshifting conference exhibition 14th-17th April 2014, Auckland, New Zealand. Paper presented at Shapeshifting conference exhibition 14th-17th April 2014, Auckland, New Zealand. AUT University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>rhythm exercise
2014 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

ABSTRACT I am a textile designer working in the area of light-emitting textiles. My research interest focuses on the exploration of new aesthetics within cloth investigating the visual effects of movement using light as a continuous, time-based medium. The exhibited artefacts use PMMA optical fibre technology in braided structures, activated by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and using a microcontroller as an interface to realize novel, light-emitting textiles. Rhythm exercise is a part of the research for my doctoral thesis which investigates the following research question: What does it mean, if time and change – constant movement – become part of the textile design expression? The research question has been investigated in a number of experiments which explore the visual effects of movement by using light integrated into textile structures as a medium. Thereby, the textile design pattern reveals its composition, not in one moment of time any more, but in fact over time. My practice based research work aims to create time-based textiles with an emphasis on developing aesthetics of movement – or to establish movement as an aesthetic moment in textile design. (Jansen, 2013) Context With the beginning of the era of Smart Textiles, the textile designer is challenged with a range of materials which are characterized by their ability to change expressional and functional properties. These materials respond to environmental stimuli, user interaction and pre-programmed parameters and visualize their responses to the viewer. They open up opportunities to explore new material behaviours and designing with novel and complex aesthetics (Berzina, 2011, Krogh, N.D., Layne, N.D., Taylor, 2010, Wingfield, N.D.). The availability of these new materials changes the conditions of conventional textile design; a textile pattern expression is no longer static, it once had one face, one gestalt or expression, whereas now it can show different expressions, a definite or indefinite number of times. (Jansen, 2013, page 7) Installation Rhythm exercise is an installation based on eight braided structures, displayed in three steel frames. The current exhibition displays parts of this installation. The three-dimensional braided artefacts are each based on thirteen lengths of optical fibres. They are lit by LEDs and programmed to create moving patterns of white light using a microcontroller digital interface. They have been designed to show different qualities of lighting interplay using varying rhythms and speeds. The different braids are created in identical braiding structures and with equal amount of lengths of optical fibres, thirteen per braid. The braided structures have, however, been connected to different numbers of LEDs; braid one has been connected to one light source, braids two to five have been connected to two light sources per braid and, finally, braids six to eight to thirteen light sources per braid. This allows displaying an increasing complexity of moving light patterns inside the braided structures. The installation shows a glimpse of new design possibilities and the potential for creative explorations in the field of light-emitting textiles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AUT University, 2014
Keywords
light-emitting, textiles, time-based, movement, PMMA optical fibres, Textile Design
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified Other Engineering and Technologies
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-7189 (URN)2320/13749 (Local ID)2320/13749 (Archive number)2320/13749 (OAI)
Conference
Shapeshifting conference exhibition 14th-17th April 2014, Auckland, New Zealand
Note

Sponsorship:

The Swedish School of Textiles and Smart Textiles Initiative at the University of Boras

Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22
Jansen, B. (2014). rhythm exercise. TextielMuseum Tilburg
Open this publication in new window or tab >>rhythm exercise
2014 (English)Other (Other academic) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

In BUILDING WITH TEXTILES, the TextielMuseum presents work by internationally renowned architects as well as interior projects that put textiles in the spotlight. Building with textiles and flexible materials has aesthetic, functional and environmental advantages. That is why textiles are now seen as the fifth key building material alongside steel, stone, concrete and wood. In addition, the development of interior textiles with special functions – from air purification to integrated light, images and sound – offers new possibilities to design smart and interactive interiors. BUILDING WITH TEXTILES is on show from 27 September 2014 until 25 January 2015. Follow us for the complete programme: www.textielmuseum.nl Rhythm exercise is a part of Barbara Jansen`s research work for her doctoral thesis which investigates the following research question: What does it mean, if time and change – constant movement – become part of the textile design expression? The research question has been investigated in a number of experiments which explore the visual effects of movement by using light integrated into textile structures as a medium. Thereby, the textile design pattern reveals its composition, not in one moment of time any more, but in fact over time. The practice based research work aims to create time-based textiles with an emphasis on developing aesthetics of movement – or to establish movement as an aesthetic moment in textile design. The exhibited artefacts use PMMA optical fibre technology in braided structures, activated by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and using a microcontroller as an interface to realize novel, light-emitting textiles.

Place, publisher, year, pages
TextielMuseum Tilburg, 2014
Keywords
light textiles, light-emitting, time-based textile patterns, expressions of movement, PMMA optical fibres, Textile Design, Smart Textiles
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified Materials Engineering
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-5383 (URN)2320/14268 (Local ID)2320/14268 (Archive number)2320/14268 (OAI)
Note

Sponsorship:

Altrud and Otto Jansen

Available from: 2015-12-17 Created: 2015-12-17 Last updated: 2016-07-14
Jansen, B. & Carleklev, J. (2014). Sinus 64 + blue. Paper presented at Shapeshifting conference exhibition 14th-17th April 2014, Auckland, New Zealand. AUT University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sinus 64 + blue
Show others...
2014 (English)Other (Refereed) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

Sinus 64 + blue explores a relationship and dialog between sound and light and is a collaborative project carried out by composer and artist Jan Carleklev and textile design researcher Barbara Jansen. It is a practice based research project investigating on the borderline between art and design in order to explore new aesthetics and experiences. In Sinus 64 + blue, sound triggers and creates a dialog with the light embedded in a textile structure. The exhibited artefact uses PMMA optical fibre technology in a woven structure which is activated by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and uses a digital interface to realize a novel, light-emitting textile expression. Sinus 64 + blue is part of the research for Barbara Jansen`s doctoral thesis which investigates the following research question: What does it mean, if time and change – constant movement – become part of the textile design expression? The research question has been investigated in a number of experiments which explore the visual effects of movement by using light integrated into textile structures as a medium. Thereby, the textile design pattern reveals its composition, not in one moment of time any more, but in fact over time. In this collaborative project, sound has been used as a trigger to activate time-based light patterns, whereby it does not only stimulate patterns of light but in fact initiates a dialog between the two. (Jansen, 2013) Installation The Sinus 64 + blue installation is based on a light-emitting woven structure (1x1 m) in which PMMA optical fibres have been interlaced with paper yarn. The optical fibres are lit by RGB-LEDs (red, green and blue LEDs which are activated through additive colour mixing) and programmed via a digital interface. In the initial experiments, the woven structure was programmed to react to three different basic sound elements, each of which triggered one of the base light colours of the RGB-LEDs, red, green or blue. The dialog between single sine pitches and the three primary colours of light explore elementary aspects of the relationship between sound and light. Sound and light have been stripped down to their most basic elements, i.e. the use of single frequency sound waves (sine pitches) and the three primary colours red, green and blue. Sound element one was created by playing three individual sine waves together. The individual sounds are slightly detuned in relation to each other, but all are close to the center frequency 64 Hz. This approach is causing interference between the three sine waves (The Physics class room, N.D., Infoplease, N.D.). The interference creates unique rhythmic sonic structures, which lay a steady beat as a foundation for the sound-light composition. This sound element triggered blue, pulsating light over the whole textile structure. Sound element two was created through a sequence of sine waves starting at a frequency of 100 Hz and increasing to 440 Hz (playing a scale from lower to higher pitch) before starting over from 100 Hz again. This over and over increasing sound scale activated the red light, floating upwards and upwards the textile structure over and over again. Sound element three was a melodic sequence of single sine waves which covered a range of high and low frequencies. They set off the green light dancing and pulsating over the textile structure. In the continued work towards composing an exhibition piece, sound-light element two and three were further developed. Sound-light element two was altered to play sequences of increasing and decreasing sine pitch scales and the tones of the scales of the pure sine waves were modified to a filtered white noise in order to simulate the sound of wind. The initial colour of the red light was given a richer colour spectrum which shift and fade between red and pink. Sound-light element three, the green colour was made richer and altered by adding some blue to achieve a more subtle nuance of green. Nevertheless, three distinct sound-light patterns create an overall composition by utilizing a more prosperous sound and colour landscape. Let yourself be surprised what happens when one, two or all three of these sound-light elements appear simultaneously during the eight minute long time-based composition.

Place, publisher, year, pages
AUT University, 2014
Keywords
sound + light, textiles, time-based, movement, PMMA optical fibres, Design, Smart Textiles, Textildesign, Textile Design
National Category
Other Humanities Materials Engineering
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-7190 (URN)2320/13729 (Local ID)2320/13729 (Archive number)2320/13729 (OAI)
Conference
Shapeshifting conference exhibition 14th-17th April 2014, Auckland, New Zealand
Note

Sponsorship:

The Swedish School of Textiles and Smart Textiles Initiative at the University of Boras

Conference:

Shapeshifting conference exhibition 14th-17th April 2014, Auckland, New Zealand

Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22 Last updated: 2016-07-15
Jansen, B. (2013). Composing over time, temporal patterns: in Textile Design. (Licentiate dissertation). University of Borås
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Composing over time, temporal patterns: in Textile Design
2013 (English)Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

The work presented in this thesis is a first attempt investigating a new field, exploring the visual effects of movement using light as a continuous time-based medium. Composing over time, temporal patterns - in Textile Design is a practice based research project that investigates the following research question: What does it mean, if time and change – constant movement – becomes part of the textile design expression? The research question has been investigated in a number of experiments that explore the visual effects of movement using light integrated into textile structures as a medium. Thereby, the textile design pattern reveals its composition, not in one moment of time any more, but in fact over time. This thesis aims to create time-based textiles with an emphasis on developing aesthetics of movement – or to establish movement as an aesthetic moment in textile design. Two distinct groups of experiments, colour flow and rhythm exercise, explore a range of different time-based expressions. The experiments have been displayed and explored using woven and braided textile structures which have been construct mainly through the integration of PMMA optical fibres. Through the design processes a first platform and understanding about time as a design material has been developed, which allows composing time-based patterns in light design. New design variables, notions and tools have been defined and established. The achieved new expressions will hopefully lead to discussions on and envisioning of future textiles, opening up the general perception of what textiles are supposed to be like, to show, to express etc., i.e. expands notions of what it means to read a piece of textile work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Borås, 2013
Series
University of Borås studies in artistic research ; 5
Keywords
temporal patterns, textile design
National Category
Other Humanities Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-3653 (URN)2320/12236 (Local ID)978-91-85659-94-4 (ISBN)2320/12236 (Archive number)2320/12236 (OAI)
Note

Editor: Lars Hallnäs (LHS), Swedish School of Textiles

Available from: 2015-12-04 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2016-08-19Bibliographically approved
Jansen, B. & Ledendal, M. (2011). Light and Shadow play: the sun as an aesthetic trigger for urban textiles. Ambience 2011, Borås, Sweden
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Light and Shadow play: the sun as an aesthetic trigger for urban textiles
2011 (English)Other (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The project investigates how the sun can be utilized to enhance aesthetics through textile surfaces in urban environments. The project explores the interplay of textiles as a sun-screening element within the outdoor public architectural space. What happens when we use the sun's heat and light to trigger a light and shadow play through a textile surface? What happens when designing with an unpre-dictable parameter – the sun – in relation to the predictability of the textile design processes? The exhibited objects; an interactive 3D model, two animation films and six storyboards, will summaries the research process and results. The interactive model is open for the audience to interact with via their own observations and explorations

Place, publisher, year, pages
Ambience 2011, Borås, Sweden, 2011
Keywords
light and shadow play, pattern composition, sun screening, urban textiles, smart textiles, thermochromic dye, solar technology, smart textiles, Smart Textiles Design
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Materials Engineering
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-5339 (URN)2320/10072 (Local ID)2320/10072 (Archive number)2320/10072 (OAI)
Note

Acknowledgements

Thanks to:

Prof. Lars Hallnäs, The Swedish School of Textiles, University of Borås, Sweden

Prof. Robert Christie, School of Textile and Design, Heriot-Watt University, UK

Sarah Taylor, textile designer, UK

Ann Hardie, School of Textile and Design, Heriot-Watt University, UK

Katja Bülow and the Daylight Laboratory at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Danmark

Henrik Bengtsson, photographer, Imaginara, Sweden

Pierre Ledendal, photographer and film production, Film & Bildstudion, Sweden

Sponsorship:

Smart-Textile Initiative

Estrid-Ericsons Stiftelse

Available from: 2015-12-17 Created: 2015-12-17 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Jansen, B. (2011). rhythm exercise_13in1. Ambience 2011, Borås, Sweden
Open this publication in new window or tab >>rhythm exercise_13in1
2011 (English)Other (Other academic) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

The exhibit is part of a series of experiments, named rhythm exercise, which explore new ways of designing with time-based parameters to create dynamic light-emitting textile structures. This series of experiments focuses on the creation of light sequences, which explore how different expressions of movement, rhythm, tempo, play and pause create dynamic tensions.

Place, publisher, year, pages
Ambience 2011, Borås, Sweden, 2011
Keywords
light-emitting, textiles, time-based, movement, digital interface, programmable, fibre optics, smart textiles, Smart Textiles Design, optical fibres, braiding, LEDs, Arduino microcontroler
National Category
Materials Engineering
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-5340 (URN)2320/10073 (Local ID)2320/10073 (Archive number)2320/10073 (OAI)
Note

Acknowledgments: Thanks to:

Lars Hallnäs, Hanna Lindholm , Javier Ferreira González at the University of Borås, Sweden, and Sarah Taylor, UK

Sponsorship:

The Swedish School of Textiles and Smart Textiles Initiative at the University of Borås, Sweden

Available from: 2015-12-17 Created: 2015-12-17 Last updated: 2016-07-14
Jansen, B. (2009). Light Shell.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Light Shell
2009 (English)Other (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

LIGHT SHELL is an investigation into self lighting textile shells – textile spaces. A LIGHT SHELL aims to enrich its future architectural environment through lighting and being a sensual stimulation of everyday life which can be experienced through vision, touch and users being able to move inside. The exhibited prototypes visualize how a Light Shell could feel like. Integrated PMMA optical fibres allow bringing dynamic changing light into the architectural space as regenerating and relaxing stimuli for the body.

Keywords
smart textiles, light textiles, light - human - wellbeing, Smart textiles
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-5327 (URN)2320/7149 (Local ID)2320/7149 (Archive number)2320/7149 (OAI)
Note
Acknowledgement: Lars Brandin, Knitting Department,/Swedish School of TextilesAvailable from: 2015-12-17 Created: 2015-12-17
Jansen, B. (2009). Textile Light Design. Paper presented at Cumulus 38ºSouth: hemispheric shifts across learning, teaching and research 2009, Melbourne, Australia. Paper presented at Cumulus 38ºSouth: hemispheric shifts across learning, teaching and research 2009, Melbourne, Australia.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Textile Light Design
2009 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

What happens if light transforms into an integrated active part of a textile surface? The field of Smart Textiles is characterized by the use of a new generation of materials, which no longer have static expressions. They change their performance and expression in a given context through outer stimuli, introducing new dimensions in design and generating a change in design practice. This paper discusses examples of light emitting textile design research, which explore aesthetic-, functional, and conceptual opportunities of PMMA optical fibres in textile applications. The outcome is a range of samples which explore how materials and different textile structures affect light intensity and quality, how to achieve patterns incorporating lighting and not lighting, and 3dimensional lighting surfaces. Light emitting models also stand for visualisation of different concept ideas; incorporating the use of sunlight as a renewable energy source or for dynamic lighting. Keywords: textile design, Smart Textiles, dynamic light, PMMA optical fibres

Keywords
smart textiles, light application, textile design, Textile Design Research
National Category
Other Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-6290 (URN)2320/5897 (Local ID)978-1-921426-52-0 (ISBN)2320/5897 (Archive number)2320/5897 (OAI)
Conference
Cumulus 38ºSouth: hemispheric shifts across learning, teaching and research 2009, Melbourne, Australia
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22
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