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Rydström, Ingela
Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Jarling, A., Rydström, I., Fransson, E. I., Nyström, M., Dalheim Englund, A.-C. & Bravell, M. E. (2022). Relationships first: Formal and informal home care of older adults in Sweden. Health & Social Care in the Community
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationships first: Formal and informal home care of older adults in Sweden
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2022 (English)In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

To a great extent, older people in Sweden, often with extensive care needs, are cared for in their own home. Support is often needed from both family and professional caregivers. This study aimed to describe and analyse different aspects of health, functioning and social networks, and how they relate to formal and informal care in the home among older adults. Analyses were performed utilising data from the OCTO-2 study, with a sample of 317 people living in Jonkoping County, aged 75, 80, 85 or 90 years, living in their own homes. Data were collected with in-person-testing. Based on receipt of care, the participants were divided into three groups: no care, informal care only, and formal care with or without informal care. Descriptive statistics and multinomial regression analysis were performed to explore the associations between received care and different aspects of health (such as multimorbidity, polypharmacy), social networks (such as loneliness, number of confidants) and functioning (such as managing daily life). The findings demonstrate that the majority of the participants received no care at home (61%). Multimorbidity and polypharmacy were more common among those receiving some kind of care in comparison to those who received no care; moreover, those receiving some kind of care also had difficulties managing daily life and less satisfaction with their social networks. The multinomial logistic regression analyses demonstrated that age, functioning in daily life, perceived general health and satisfaction with the number of confidants were related to receipt of care, but the associations among these factors differed depending on the type of care that was received. The results show the importance of a holistic perspective that includes the older person's experiences when planning home care. The results also highlight the importance of considering social perspectives and relationships in home care rather than focusing only on health factors.

Keywords
community, family caregiving, health and social care, health care, home care, informal care, older people, PEOPLE, HEALTH, LIFE
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-27717 (URN)10.1111/hsc.13765 (DOI)000772823500001 ()2-s2.0-85127257006 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council, Sweden, 13282
Available from: 2022-04-04 Created: 2022-04-04 Last updated: 2022-04-12Bibliographically approved
Jarling, A., Rydström, I., Ernsth Bravell, M., Nyström, M. & Dalheim Englund, A.-C. (2020). Perceptions of Professional Responsibility When Caring for Older People in Home Care in Sweden. Journal of Community Health Nursing, 37(3), 141-152
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of Professional Responsibility When Caring for Older People in Home Care in Sweden
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Community Health Nursing, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 141-152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Older people in Sweden are increasingly being cared for in the own home, where professional caregivers play an important role. This study aimed to describe perceptions of caring responsibility in the context of older people’s homes from the perspective of professional caregivers from caring professions. Fourteen interviews were conducted with professional caregivers from different professions. The result show how professional caregivers perceive responsibility as limitless, constrained by time, moral, overseeing, meaningful and lonesome. Responsibility seems to affect caregivers to a large extent when the burden is high. Professional caregivers’ perceptions of responsibility, and the potential consequences of a perceived strained work situation therefore need to be addressed. The findings also indicate a need for professional support and guidance when it is difficult to distinguish between professional and personal responsibility.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-23963 (URN)10.1080/07370016.2020.1780044 (DOI)000561996900003 ()2-s2.0-85089745456 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-10-22 Created: 2020-10-22 Last updated: 2021-10-21Bibliographically approved
Jarling, A., Rydström, I., Ernsth-Bravell, M., Nyström, M. & Dalheim Englund, A.-C. (2019). A responsibility that never rests - To be a family caregiver to an older person. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A responsibility that never rests - To be a family caregiver to an older person
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2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

When the ageing population increases, the burden and responsibility of close family members will likely increase. Those closely related who assume a great responsibility can be significantly affected in health, well‐being and daily life.

Aim

This study aims to describe the life situation when family caregivers are imposed responsibility for an older person with complex care needs in their own home.

Methods

In this Swedish qualitative study, ten family caregivers were strategically selected in order to achieve variations in the life situation. A reflective lifeworld research design based on phenomenological philosophy was used throughout the data collection with the lifeworld interviews and the analytic process.

Findings

In terms of extensive responsibility, the life situation is complex and involves emotions that are difficult to manage. In essence, a paradoxical life situation is described which is experienced as both voluntarily and nonchosen at the same time. The responsibility never rests. The essential meaning is further illustrated with three constituents: loss of freedom, contradictory feelings and affected relationships.

Conclusion

A life situation with extensive responsibility for an older family member interferes with the whole life situation with an impact on health and relationships with other people. The findings are crucial for professional caregivers in order to capture the nature of family support in a way that enables a meaningful life for both the family caregiver and the older person being cared for. Knowledge of this will give professional caregivers an increased awareness of the life situation of family caregivers and provide a better understanding of the support they are longing for, and, in some countries, such as Sweden, also are entitled to by law.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21011 (URN)10.1111/scs.12703 (DOI)000516881800005 ()2-s2.0-85065418558 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-10 Created: 2019-05-10 Last updated: 2021-10-20Bibliographically approved
Jarling, A., Rydström, I., Ernsth-Bravell, M., Nyström, M. & Dalheim Englund, A.-C. (2018). Becoming a guest in your own home: Home care in Sweden from the perspective of older people with multimorbidities. International Journal of Older People Nursing, 13(3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Becoming a guest in your own home: Home care in Sweden from the perspective of older people with multimorbidities
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 13, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract Background: In line with changing demographics, conditions for older people have also changed. Older people are expected to live and be cared for in their own home for as long as possible. Increasing age also increases the risk of multimorbidity and the need for social services and health care services. Home care, instituted by different laws, is complex and requires cooperation from an older person when his/her home becomes a workplace for service providers.

Aim: This study aims to illuminate the meaning of being an older person with multimorbidity who lives alone and who is cared for in his/her own home.

Design: This study uses a qualitative design with a lifeworld approach.

Methods: Conducted in Sweden in 2016, the researchers interviewed 12 older persons that live alone and receive home care. Data was analysed using qualitative content analysis.

Results: The findings illustrate four sub-themes: adapting to a caring culture, being exposed, participation with limitations and being dependent on forced relationships. The overall theme reveals that older people experience a life-changing situation when receiving home care and they become a guest in their own home.

Conclusions: Becoming older with increased needs means to disrupt one’s life when one’s private home becomes a public arena. Caregivers need to be aware of the gap between their rights by law and an older person’s experiences of receiving home care. Only then can care be offered that enables older people to have a sense of control and experience their home as their own.

Implications for Practice: The findings emphasise the need to view older people as being self-determinant and independent. Older people receiving home care need to be seen as individuals, and their entire life situation should be considered by also acknowledging the important role played by relatives and caregivers.

Keywords
Older people, multimorbidity, caring, home care, lived experience, life world
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15643 (URN)10.1111/opn.12194 (DOI)000442344100006 ()29603651 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85051844566 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-09 Created: 2019-01-09 Last updated: 2020-11-13Bibliographically approved
Rydström, I., Dalheim Englund, A.-C., Dellve, L. & Ahlstrom, L. (2017). Importance of social capital at the workplace for return to work among women with a history of long-term sick leave: a cohort study.. BMC Nursing, 14(16)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Importance of social capital at the workplace for return to work among women with a history of long-term sick leave: a cohort study.
2017 (English)In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, ISSN ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 14, no 16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The workplace is an essential source of social capital for many people; it provides mutual support and gives meaning to life. However, few prospective studies have thoroughly investigated the importance of aspects of social capital in the workplace. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between aspects of social capital (social support, sense of community, and quality of leadership) at the workplace, and work ability, working degree, and vitality among women with a history of long-term sick leave from human service organizations.

Methods

A longitudinal cohort study was performed among women with a history of long-term sick leave. The study started in 2005, and the women were followed up at 6 months, 1 year, and 6 years using self-reported questionnaires (baseline n = 283). Linear mixed models were used for longitudinal analysis of the repeated measurements of prospective degree of work ability, working degree, and vitality. Analyses were performed with different models; the explanatory variables for each model were social support, sense of community, and quality of leadership and time.

Results

Social capital in terms of quality of leadership (being good at solving conflicts and giving high priority to job satisfaction), sense of community (co-operation between colleagues) and social support (help and support from immediate superiors and colleagues) increased the women’s work ability score (WAS) as well as working degree over time. Additionally, social capital in terms of quality of leadership increased the women’s vitality score over time.

Conclusions

A sustainable return-to-work process among individuals with a history of long-term sick leave, going in and out of work participation, could be supported with social support, good quality of leadership, and a sense of community at the workplace. The responsibility for the rehabilitation process can not be reduced to an individual problem, but ought to include all stakeholders involved in the process, such as managers, colleagues, health care services, and the social security agency.

Keywords
Cohort, Sickness absence, Social attachment, Social capital, Vitality, Work ability, Quality of leadership
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13258 (URN)10.1186/s12912-017-0234-2 (DOI)000405812500001 ()28725159 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85023643292 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2017-12-18 Created: 2017-12-18 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Jonasson, L.-L., Nyström, M. & Rydström, I. (2017). Reflective team in caring for people living with dementia: A base for care improvement.. Reflective Practice, 18(3), 397-409
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reflective team in caring for people living with dementia: A base for care improvement.
2017 (English)In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 397-409Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A reflective team (RT) is a team of professional carers who reflect on a specific caring issue under the direction of an RT leader. The goal for the reflective process is to accomplish care improvement based on research and proven experience, and the first step is to reflect upon the competence that already exists in the context where RT takes place. This study aims to bring previous unarticulated competence for dementia care to the surface, after it has been reflected during RT sessions. Ten staff nurses who work close to patients with dementia and attend RT sessions on regular basis were interviewed about their competence for dementia care. Through a phenomenographic analyze two qualitatively separated categories emerged; general caring skills and specific dementia caring skills. It is concluded that specific skills for dementia care build on general caring skills, and that tacit knowledge can emerge to proven experience when it has been reflected in RT.

Keywords
Reflective team, general caring skills, specific dementia caring skills, Phenomenography
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-10390 (URN)10.1080/14623943.2017.1294534 (DOI)000403432700008 ()2-s2.0-85028269988 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Reflekterande team
Available from: 2016-07-17 Created: 2016-07-17 Last updated: 2018-01-03Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, K., Dalheim Englund, A.-C., Enskär, K., Nyström, M. & Rydström, I. (2016). Experiencing Support During Needle-Related Medical Procedures: A Hermeneutic Study With Young Children (3-7 Years). Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, 31(6), 667-677
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiencing Support During Needle-Related Medical Procedures: A Hermeneutic Study With Young Children (3-7 Years)
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 667-677Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Needle-related medical procedures (NRMPs) are something that all young children need to undergo at some point. These procedures may involve feelings of fear, pain and anxiety, which can cause problems later in life either when seeking healthcare in general or when seeking care specifically involving needles. More knowledge is needed about supporting children during these procedures.

AIM:

This study aims to explain and understand the meaning of the research phenomenon: support during NRMPs. The lived experiences of the phenomenon are interpreted from the perspective of younger children.

METHOD:

The analysis uses a lifeworld hermeneutic approach based on participant observations and interviews with children between 3 and 7years of age who have experienced NRMPs.

RESULTS:

The research phenomenon, support for younger children during NRMPs, is understood through the following themes: being the centre of attention, getting help with distractions, being pampered, becoming involved, entrusting oneself to the safety of adults and being rewarded. A comprehensive understanding is presented wherein younger children experience support from adults during NRMPs in order to establish resources and/or strengthen existing resources.

CONCLUSIONS:

The manner in which the child will be guided through the procedure is developed based on the child's reactions. This approach demonstrates that children are actively participating during NRMPs. Supporting younger children during NRMPs consists of guiding them through a shared situation that is mutually beneficial to the child, the parent and the nurse. Play during NRMP is an important tool that enables the support to be perceived as positive.

Keywords
Caring science, Lifeworld hermeneutic, Needle-related medical procedures, Reflective lifeworld research, Support, Younger children
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13262 (URN)10.1016/j.pedn.2016.06.004 (DOI)000389587500015 ()27426015 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84996483982 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-18 Created: 2017-12-18 Last updated: 2017-12-20Bibliographically approved
Dalheim Englund, A.-C., Rydström, I., Dellve, L. & Åhlstrom, L. (2016). Social support outside work and return to work among women on long-term sick leave working within human service organizations. Applied Nursing Research, 30(May 2016), 187-193
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social support outside work and return to work among women on long-term sick leave working within human service organizations
2016 (English)In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 30, no May 2016, p. 187-193Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AbstractAim To investigate the relationships between return to work and social support outside work among women on long-term sick leave from human service organizations. Background Work is an important part of life and is, in general, considered to be supportive of health and wellbeing. Few studies have thoroughly investigated the importance of aspects of social support outside work for return to work. Methods A cohort of women on long-term sick leave was followed with questionnaires from 2005 to 2012. Results The availability of social attachment increased the women's work ability, return to work, and vitality significantly more over time. There were positive relationships between return to work and seeking support in terms of emotional support and comfort and expressing unpleasant feelings. Conclusions Important resources to increase return to work can be found in factors outside work, such as close social relationships and support seeking. Thus, it is important to take the woman's whole life situation into account and not focus solely on aspects related to the workplace.

Keywords
Sickness absence, Social attachment, Social capital, Vitality, Work ability, Cohort
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-8843 (URN)10.1016/j.apnr.2015.06.007 (DOI)000375340300034 ()27091277 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84960948413 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-02-12 Created: 2016-02-12 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, K., Rydström, I., Nyström, M., Enskär, K. & Dalheim Englund, A.-C. (2015). Consequences of Needle-Related Medical Procedures: A Hermeneutic Study With Young Children (3–7 Years). Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, 31(2), 109-118
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consequences of Needle-Related Medical Procedures: A Hermeneutic Study With Young Children (3–7 Years)
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 109-118Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Needle-related medical procedures (NRMPs) are often frightening and cause children anxiety and pain. Only a few studies have examined the perspectives of younger children. More knowledge is needed about younger children's experiences in caring situations such as NRMPs. Aim The aim of this study was to explain and understand the consequences related to NRMPs from younger children's perspectives. Methods Participant observations and interviews with younger children who had experienced NRMPs were analysed using a lifeworld hermeneutic approach. Results Experiencing fear is central for younger children during an NRMP and interpretation of its consequences formed the basis for the following themes: seeking security, realizing the adult's power, struggling for control, feeling ashamed, and surrendering. A comprehensive understanding is presented wherein younger children's experiences of NRMPs vary across time and space related to weakening and strengthening their feelings of fear. Conclusions Awareness is needed that adults' power becomes more obvious for children during an NRMP. Children's surrender does not necessarily imply acceptance of the procedure. Providing children with opportunities to control elements of the procedure creates a foundation for active participation, and vice versa.

Keywords
Younger children, Lived experiences, Consequences, Needle-related medical procedures, Caring science, Reflective lifeworld research, Lifeworld hermeneutic
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-997 (URN)10.1016/j.pedn.2015.09.008 (DOI)000370808800005 ()26603292 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84958927460 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-11-02 Created: 2015-11-02 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
Rydström, I. & Dalheim Englund, A.-C. (2015). Meeting Swedish Health Care System: Immigarant parens of children with asthma narrate. Clinical Nursing Research, 24(4), 415-431
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meeting Swedish Health Care System: Immigarant parens of children with asthma narrate
2015 (English)In: Clinical Nursing Research, ISSN 1054-7738, E-ISSN 1552-3799, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 415-431Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Coming to a new country involves many challenges. One of them is to approach a new health care system when you have a child with asthma. The aim of this study was to gain a broader understanding of immigrant parents’ experiences of the Swedish health care system. Twelve parents of children with asthma were interviewed and their narratives were analyzed by using qualitative content analysis. The results show that immigrant parents’ experiences of Swedish health care vary and involve both advantages and disadvantages. Advantages of the Swedish health care system are described as Being met with respect and Affordable care, while disadvantages are described as Problems with communication, Being discriminated against and Lack of confidence. The disadvantages are challenges for health care professionals, who are expected to offer care on equal terms to the whole population. Therefore, they need to provide culturally competent care and encourage immigrant parents to voice their expectations and worries.

Keywords
asthma, qualitative, immigrant, parents, health care settings
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13253 (URN)10.1177/1054773814534439 (DOI)000357748600007 ()24853374 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84936873829 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-18 Created: 2017-12-18 Last updated: 2017-12-20Bibliographically approved
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