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Carlsson, Gunilla
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 53) Show all publications
Keresi, Z., Carlsson, G. & Lindberg, E. (2019). A caring relationship as a prerequisite for patient participation in a psychiatric care setting: A qualitative study from the nurses’ perspective. Nordic journal of nursing research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A caring relationship as a prerequisite for patient participation in a psychiatric care setting: A qualitative study from the nurses’ perspective
2019 (English)In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The participation of patients in their treatment and care is perceived as desirable; however, patients with mental illnesses experience limited opportunities to participate in their own care. As nurses play a key role in taking care of patients with mental illnesses, this study aimed to investigate how nurses within psychiatric care settings experience patients’ participation and howthey act to increase it. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight registered nurses, four of whom worked in apsychiatric institutional care setting and four of whom worked with outpatients. Data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis approach. The analysis identified a theme: a caring relationship is a prerequisite for patient participation. This theme wa sfurther developed through five subthemes. The findings illustrate critical aspects of the caring relationship by which the nurse–patient relationship can either facilitate or impede patient participation. A caring relationship builds trust and increases the patient’s sense of responsibility for their own condition. Because patients with mental illness are cared for in many different contexts, the results of the present study have implications for a broad range of healthcare environments.

Keywords
caring relation, patient participation, psychiatric care, qualitative research
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21886 (URN)10.1177/2057158519866393 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-10-23 Created: 2019-10-23 Last updated: 2019-10-29Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, G. (2019). Existensiellt vårdande - med fokus på patientens värld (3:1ed.). In: Lena Wiklund (Ed.), Vårdande vid psykisk ohälsa - på avancerad nivå: (pp. 95-112). Lund: Studentlitteratur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Existensiellt vårdande - med fokus på patientens värld
2019 (Swedish)In: Vårdande vid psykisk ohälsa - på avancerad nivå / [ed] Lena Wiklund, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2019, 3:1, p. 95-112Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2019 Edition: 3:1
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22252 (URN)9789144123684 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-19 Created: 2019-12-19 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Dalheim Englund, A.-C., Carlsson, G., Nyström, M., Gillsjö, C., Eriksson, I. & Palmér, L. (2019). Life without professional work-perceptionsabout one’s self, interpersonal relations andsocial life after retirement. Healthy Aging Research, 8(1), 1-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life without professional work-perceptionsabout one’s self, interpersonal relations andsocial life after retirement
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2019 (English)In: Healthy Aging Research, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to understand how healthy, older adults in Sweden perceive their life situation after retirement. The study is based on a lifeworld approach, and a phenomenographic method was used. Eighteen participants were interviewed, and data were analysed according to the phenomenographic principle of qualitatively different categories. Two categories were developed. The first category, “perceptions that draw attention inward, towards one’s self”, was further described in three subcategories: Sense of decreased status in society, the desire to keep aging at a distance, and contemplation of one’s own existence. The second category, “perceptions that draw attention outward, away from one’s self” was further described in the following four subcategories: caretaking of family members, involvement in social relationships, finding of deep meaning in animals and nature and engagement with society. In the discussion, the findings are further illuminated through comparisons with concepts such as maturity, wisdom and gerotranscendence, and reflections on the findings ‘relevance to a caring context follow. The conclusion suggests this study can provide knowledge that will allow healthcare providers to bridge the gap between generations in order to provide high-quality care. However, for a more profound caring dialogue, for example, about the end of life, a deeper analysis is required.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15888 (URN)10.12715/har.2019.8.2 (DOI)000467323300001 ()
Available from: 2019-03-21 Created: 2019-03-21 Last updated: 2020-01-31Bibliographically approved
Lundvall, M., Lindberg, E., Hörberg, U., Carlsson, G. & Palmér, L. (2019). Lost in an unknown terrain: a phenomenological contribution to the understanding of existential concerns as experienced by young women in Sweden. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 14(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lost in an unknown terrain: a phenomenological contribution to the understanding of existential concerns as experienced by young women in Sweden
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of this study is to describe young women's (16-25 years old) experiences of living with existential concerns for which they have sought support from healthcare professionals, teachers, family, or friends, among others.

Methods: This phenomenological study is based on a reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach. Nine young women were interviewed about their experience of living with existential concerns.

Results: The results show the essential meaning of the phenomenon of "existential concerns" that can be described as living a life that is marked in a profound way by a feeling of being lost in an unknown terrain. To further understand the essential meaning, four constituents are described: the unpredictable body, longing for comprehension, playing a game, and longing to share one's vulnerability.

Conclusions: Young women with existential concerns are vulnerable, as they are profoundly influenced by these concerns. They have to navigate through daily life while trying to fit in and to make their situation comprehensible. These young women have a longing to share their existential concerns with a trustworthy person, while at the same time they fear revealing their existential concerns and risking being rejected by others. A lifeworld-led, caring science approach, intertwined with the results of the present study, has the potential to direct caring practice.

Keywords
Caring science, existential concerns, mental health, phenomenology, reflective lifeworld research, young women
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21736 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2019.1658843 (DOI)000482928300001 ()31451104 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071260290 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-16 Created: 2019-09-16 Last updated: 2020-02-14Bibliographically approved
Palmér, L., Nyström, M., Carlsson, G., Gillsjö, C., Eriksson, I. & Dalheim Englund, A.-C. (2019). The meaning of growing old: A lifeworld hermeneutic study on existential matters during the third age of life. Healthy Aging Research, 8(8), 1-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The meaning of growing old: A lifeworld hermeneutic study on existential matters during the third age of life
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2019 (English)In: Healthy Aging Research, ISSN 2261-7434, Vol. 8, no 8, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates existential matters in the third age of life, which encompasses the years after retirement and ends when extensive support needs emerge in the fourth age. As the theoretical starting point in a lifeworld hermeneutic approach, 18 healthy older adults were interviewed about what it means for them to grow old. The interviews were interpreted according to Gadamer’s principles of openness and Ricoeur’s proposal to provide suggestions on how meaning can be explained. The findings are presented in three interpreted themes: Feeling free, Becoming vulnerable, and Existing in closeness to death. The themes are further interpreted, and a comprehensive understanding is reached with theoretical support from Jean-Paul Sartre’s idea of factuality and project. The meaning of growing old is discussed in terms of positive factors, such as healthy aging, transition and gerotranscendence, but also in respect to concerns over future suffering in relation to illness and dependence. It is concluded that the freedom of the third age is greatly appreciated for a healthy life, but also threatened by increased risks of ill health. It is not morbidity in itself that worries most, but the risk of being dependent on care and support from others. This is important to consider when planning and performing care in order to promote a healthy aging.

Keywords
Caring science, Dependence on care, Existential matters, Healthy aging, Lifeworld hermeneutics
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21588 (URN)10.35248/har.2019.8.8 (DOI)000489302100001 ()
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Lundvall, M., Lindberg, E., Hörberg, U., Palmér, L. & Carlsson, G. (2018). Healthcare professionals’ lived experiences of conversationswith young adults expressing existential concerns. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 1-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthcare professionals’ lived experiences of conversationswith young adults expressing existential concerns
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2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction:

This paper describes first-line department healthcare professionals’ experiences of conversations with young adults (16–25 years) who express existential concerns. Existential concerns encompass questions about the meaning of life and the choices people must make, and they are sometimes expressed during the period in which a child is becoming an adult. Sometimes the transition to adulthood can be difficult, and many young adults seek support from people in first-line departments, such as primary care providers, youth guidance centre personnel and student health service employees in high schools and universities. Conversations in which existential concerns are recognised may be important for preventing mental illness in the future.

Aim:

The study aimed to describe healthcare professionals’ lived experiences of conversations with young adults who express existential concerns.

Approach and methods:

This qualitative study utilises thematic meaning analysis. Interviews were conducted with healthcare professionals working in first-line departments, and data were analysed based on the principles of reflective lifeworld research. The study followed ethical codes of conduct and conformed to the ethical guidelines adopted by the Swedish Research Council.

Findings:

The results are presented in three themes of meaning: searching for innermost thoughts requires being present, uncertainty about the unpredictable and awakening of one’s own existential concerns.

Conclusions and implications:

Healthcare professionals are affected when young adults express their existential concerns, and they need more support to strengthen their ability to stay present and create inviting atmospheres

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15074 (URN)10.1111/scs.12612 (DOI)000462154100014 ()30152541 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053204338 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2020-01-31Bibliographically approved
Eskilsson, C., Lindberg, E., Carlsson, G., Ekebergh, M. & Hörberg, U. (2017). Managers' responsibility to support caring and learning in clinical education units. Clinical Nursing Studies, 5(3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managers' responsibility to support caring and learning in clinical education units
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2017 (English)In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7940, E-ISSN 2324-7959, Vol. 5, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:Managers in clinical education units (CEUs) have the responsibility to facilitate evidence-based environments for both caring and learning. Promoting such environments might be challenging in times of financial constraints and organisation changes.

Objective:The purpose of this study was to describe how managers experience their responsibility to support the caring and learning environments in CEUs. 

Methods:The study method followed the principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) grounded in a phenomenological approach. The study was conducted at a hospital in Southern Sweden. Ten first- and second-line managers responsible for CEUs were interviewed. The interviews were conducted as reflective dialogues using an open, and bridled approach.

Results:The results show that clinical education unit managers regard the responsibility to support caring and learning environments as a challenging experience, elucidated in three themes: (1) to have or to take responsibility; (2) cooperation that supports and challenges; and (3) bringing it all together— a daily struggle.

Conclusions:In conclusion, the managers of CEUs need to be aware of the importance of common theoretical grounds for caring and learning. Caring and learning are more likely to be intertwined when responsibility is taken, when collaboration between actors is characterised by respect and when an awareness of the importance of reflection is present. Awareness of the importance of creating opportunities for reflection and mutual collaboration among the different actors involved could lead to improvements in nursing education and, therefore, improved patient care.

Keywords
Clinical education unit, Managers
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13033 (URN)10.5430/cns.v5n3p34 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2017-12-15Bibliographically approved
Eskilsson, C., Hörberg, U., Ekebergh, M., Lindberg, E. & Carlsson, G. (2015). Caring and learning intertwined in supervision at a dedicated education unit ‒ a phenomenological study. Reflective Practice, 16(6), 753-764
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caring and learning intertwined in supervision at a dedicated education unit ‒ a phenomenological study
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2015 (English)In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 753-764Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Supervising student nurses in clinical praxis entails dealing with both caring and learning aspects. There is a dearth of research focusing on both the caring and learning aspects in supervision. The present study describes how caring and learning is intertwined in supervision. The study was performed with a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach and analyzed phenomenologically for meanings. Eight interviews were conducted with supervisors on an orthopedic-dedicated education unit. The findings reveal how supervisors constantly move in order to be either close to or standing back, adjusting to the students’ and the patients’ needs. This is described in more detail via the constituents: handling responsibility in constant movement, participating in a new and different way, coexisting with students creates meaning and development. The findings show that a reflective attitude in supervision , clear structure for daily activities, and a lifeworld-led didactics can promote a learning and caring environment. Supervisors’ demanding task requires pauses in order to maintain motivation among supervisors. A mutual link between supervisors, students and patients is crucial in order to create an environment where caring and learning are intertwined. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

Keywords
caring, dedicated education unit, lifeworld, phenomenology, supervisor
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-3964 (URN)10.1080/14623943.2015.1095726 (DOI)000365611200004 ()2-s2.0-84948580554 (Scopus ID)
Note

Export Date: 9 December 2015

Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
Palmér, L., Carlsson, G., Brunt, D. & Nyström, M. (2015). Existential security is a necessary condition forcontinued breastfeeding despite severe initialdifficulties: a lifeworld hermeneutical study. International Breastfeeding Journal, 10(17), 1-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Existential security is a necessary condition forcontinued breastfeeding despite severe initialdifficulties: a lifeworld hermeneutical study
2015 (English)In: International Breastfeeding Journal, ISSN 1746-4358, E-ISSN 1746-4358, Vol. 10, no 17, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:The majority of new mothers in Sweden initiate breastfeeding and many experience initial difficulties. This experience is an important cause of early breastfeeding cessation. To increase understanding, there is a need to explore the lived experiences of the decision to continue or cease breastfeeding. The aim of this study is therefore to explain and understand how this decision is influenced by the meaning of severe initial difficulties.

Methods: A lifeworld hermeneutical approach was used for the study. The study was conducted in Sweden with eight mothers who experienced severe difficulties with initial breastfeeding. All except one were interviewed on two different occasions resulting in fifteen interviews. The interviews were conducted between 2010 and 2013.

Results: Mothers who experience severe difficulties with initial breastfeeding feel both overtaken and violated not only by their own infants and their own bodies but also by their anger, expectations, loneliness and care from health professionals. These feelings of being overtaken and invaded provoke an existential crisis and place mothers at a turning point in which these feelings are compared and put in relation to one another in the negotiation of the decision to continue or cease breastfeeding. This decision thus depends on the possibility of feeling secure with the breastfeeding relationship. If insecurity dominates, this can, in severe cases, create a feeling of fear of breastfeeding that is so great that there is no alternative but to stop breastfeeding.

Conclusions: Existential security in the breastfeeding relationship seems to be an underlying factor for confidence and therefore a necessary condition for continued breastfeeding when having severe initial breastfeeding difficulties. Unresolved feelings of insecurity may be a serious barrier to further breastfeeding that can result in a fear of breastfeeding. Such fear can force the mother to cease breastfeeding. This study highlights how women are situated in a complex cultural and biological context of breastfeeding that has existential consequences for them. An existential crisis forces mothers into a turning point for the breastfeeding decision. In the existential crisis, mothers’ responsibility for the mother-infant relationship guides continuing or ceasing breastfeeding.

Keywords
Breastfeeding, Caring science, Early breastfeeding cessation, Hermeneutic, Initial breastfeeding
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-600 (URN)10.1186/s13006-015-0042-9 (DOI)000354206100001 ()25960763 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85027924107 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-08-10 Created: 2015-08-10 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
Eskilsson, C., Carlsson, G., Ekebergh, M. & Hörberg, U. (2015). Patients' experiences of being cared for by student nurses. In: : . Paper presented at 'Exploring care for human service professions' Nordic College of Caring Science & The European Academy of Caring Science, Diakonissestiftelsen, Copenhagen Denmark, March 19-20, 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' experiences of being cared for by student nurses
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background It is crucial for patients to be met by understanding in their vulnerability, to be treated by competence that ensure adequate care and met with an encouraging attitude to participate in their health process. They meet professional careers as well as students, but nevertheless the aim for caring is the same: to provide good and secure care for the patients, all in line with a caring science approach. A limit amount of studies illuminate patients’ experiences of receiving care from student nurses. Aim The aim was to describe how patients perceived being cared for by student nurses, in a clinical context Method The study has been performed with a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach founded on phenomenology. 11 lifeworld interviews were conducted with patients, recently discharged from an orthopedic Dedicated Education Unit. Data have been analyzed for meanings. Results Patients perceive that they are being carried along on the students' learning process like a journey together. This is characterized by a fluctuation between stable and unstable care from the students. Along this journey, patients are in need of a mutual invitation to participation, of genuine encounters, and essential support. Conclusion The patient-student-supervisor relationship is of importance for patients’ experience of being cared for by student nurses in a clinical setting. Genuine encounters between patient and student must be identified and can be stimulated by didactic support and reflection grounded in caring science with a lifeworld perspective. Supervisors have to support to both students and patients in order to create a safe environment in which caring and learning are intertwined. Students require patients in their learning process but patients’ vulnerability, need for participation, genuine encounters and essential support, must be taken into account.

Keywords
Patients’ experiences, Reflective lifeworld research, Student nurse, Dedicated education unit, Caring
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-8395 (URN)
Conference
'Exploring care for human service professions' Nordic College of Caring Science & The European Academy of Caring Science, Diakonissestiftelsen, Copenhagen Denmark, March 19-20, 2015.
Available from: 2016-01-11 Created: 2016-01-11 Last updated: 2018-05-29Bibliographically approved
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