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Bolton, Kim
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Publications (10 of 113) Show all publications
Hellwig, C., Moshtaghian, H., Persson, D., Bolton, K., Rousta, K. & Häggblom-Kronlöf, G. (2024). Glocal and ecoethical perceptions of engagement with fungi-based food. Journal of Cleaner Production, 440, Article ID 140898.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Glocal and ecoethical perceptions of engagement with fungi-based food
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 440, article id 140898Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fungal fermentation is a promising strategy to secure affordable, nutritious and sustainable food. Encouraging engagement with fungi-based food is crucial to contribute to social, economic, and environmental sustainability. Reflections can trigger a sense of meaning in engaging in activities and with resources. The aim of this mixed methods study was to explore perceptions of whether participants think their own engagement with fungi-based food is consequential. To do so, the study explored ecoethical reflections relating to whether participants thought engaging with fungi-based food is beneficial or not beneficial for the environment. This study also explored glocal reflections of whether participants thought their own engagement with this kind of food is beneficial or not beneficial in ways that extend to people around them (i.e., local population) or people in other parts of the world (i.e., global population). N = 160 participants completed questionnaires. Most participants expressed a positive outlook, believing that embracing fungi-based food could promote increased sustainability and overall well-being for humans and the environment in numerous different ways. The perceptions that participants shared can affect and trigger conscious engagement with fungi-based food locally with awareness of its global impact which, in turn, can promote well-being for individuals and extend to the population level and thereby contribute to efforts at archiving sustainable development. Nevertheless, the findings highlight a necessity for more information to enable individuals to engage in knowledgeable reflections and, ultimately, act upon their values and what is meaningful to them. The results are important for future development and conceptualization of not only fungi-based food but also other food that is expected to contribute to sustainable development.

Keywords
Filamentous fungi, Future food, Sustainability, Circular economy, Food security, Resource recovery
National Category
Other Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-31597 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2024.140898 (DOI)
Funder
European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), 20201656Swedish Agency for Economic and Regional Growth, 10.13039/501100012380
Note

Funding: European Cooperation in Science and Technology 10.13039/501100000921

Available from: 2024-02-20 Created: 2024-02-20 Last updated: 2024-02-20
Moshtaghian, H., Bolton, K. & Rousta, K. (2024). Upcycled food choice motives and their association with hesitancy towards consumption of this type of food: a Swedish study. British Food Journal, 126(1), 48-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Upcycled food choice motives and their association with hesitancy towards consumption of this type of food: a Swedish study
2024 (English)In: British Food Journal, ISSN 0007-070X, E-ISSN 1758-4108, Vol. 126, no 1, p. 48-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

This study investigates factors motivating upcycled food choices and assesses the association between these factors and hesitancy towards upcycled food consumption in a Swedish population.

Design/methodology/approach

An online food choice questionnaire was used. Participants (n = 682) were categorised into Inclined and Hesitant groups based on their intention to consume upcycled foods. The factors motivating upcycled food choices were identified using explanatory factor analyses. Independent t-tests assessed the differences in the mean importance score of factors between the two groups. The association between upcycled food choice factors and hesitancy towards consumption was evaluated by logistic regressions (adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics).

Findings

The most important upcycled food choice factor in both groups was ethical concerns, followed by natural content, sensory appeal, price, healthiness, familiarity and impression. The Inclined group's mean importance score for ethical concern was higher than the Hesitant group (p(value)<0.001) and, except for natural content, the mean importance scores for the other factors were higher in the Hesitant group compared to the Inclined group (p(value)<0.05). Participants who perceived ethical concern as an important factor had lower odds of hesitancy (Odds ratio = 0.39; 95%CI:0.26,0.59; p(value)<0.001), and those who considered sensory appeal an important factor had higher odds of hesitancy (Odds ratio = 2.42; 95%CI:1.62,3.63; p(value)<0.001) towards upcycled food consumption compared to participants who did not consider these as important factors.

Originality/value

This is the first study investigating health and non-health-related upcycled food choice motives using a food choice questionnaire. Identifying these motives helps food developers and researchers determine factors influencing upcycled food consumption.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2024
Keywords
Upcycled food, Waste to value food, Value-added surplus food, Food choice motives, Upcycled food acceptability
National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-29417 (URN)10.1108/bfj-09-2022-0757 (DOI)000914019500001 ()2-s2.0-85146397803 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: This work was supported by the SparbankstiftelsenSjuhärd research grant.

Available from: 2023-02-06 Created: 2023-02-06 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Hellwig, C., Bolton, K., Häggblom-Kronlöf, G. & Rousta, K. (2023). Aspects Affecting Food Choice in Daily Life as Well as Drivers and Barriers to Engagement with Fungi-Based Food: A Qualitative Perspective. Sustainability, 15(1), Article ID 317.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aspects Affecting Food Choice in Daily Life as Well as Drivers and Barriers to Engagement with Fungi-Based Food: A Qualitative Perspective
2023 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 317Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fungi-based food is expected to contribute to more sustainable food systems. The present study has three focus areas: (i) aspects that affect food choices food in daily life, (ii) aspects that affect choices of fungi-based food in particular, and (iii) drivers that motivate, and barriers that prevent, engagement in cultivating fungi and cooking fungi-based food at home. One hundred and sixty participants, who were recruited using convenience sampling, filled out qualitative questionnaires. The results show that there are numerous aspects (e.g., environmental benefits, nutrition, sensory characteristics, production practices and ingredients) that are important when people choose food in daily life. In addition to curiosity, many of these aspects also affect the choice of fungi-based food. The study identified more drivers (e.g., self-providing, curiosity, awareness of ingredients) than barriers (time, knowledge, concerns about contamination) to cultivation and cooking of fungi-based food at home. The findings are relevant for the development of fungi-based food so that this type of food is engaged with, and so that it can contribute to more sustainable food systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
future food, sustainability, sustainable lifestyles, filamentous fungi, fungi-based food, resource recovery
National Category
Other Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-29178 (URN)10.3390/su15010317 (DOI)000909806000001 ()2-s2.0-85145994190 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Agency for Economic and Regional Growth, 20201656
Note

Funder: European Cooperation in Science and Technology through the Cross-Border Transfer and Development of Sustainable Resource Recovery Strategies Towards Zero Waste (FULLRECO4US) 

Available from: 2023-01-03 Created: 2023-01-03 Last updated: 2024-01-16Bibliographically approved
Kadawo, A., Sadagopan, M., During, O., Bolton, K. & Nagy, A. (2023). Combination of LCA and circularity index for assessment of environmental impact of recycled aggregate concrete. Journal of Sustainable Cement-Based Materials, 12(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combination of LCA and circularity index for assessment of environmental impact of recycled aggregate concrete
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Sustainable Cement-Based Materials, ISSN 2165-0373, E-ISSN 2165-0381, Vol. 12, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Multidisciplinary approach is used to evaluate concrete with recycled concrete aggregates (RCA) from technical, environmental impacts and product circularity perspectives. Two RCA replacements investigated, RAC50: fine aggregates; RAC100: both coarse, fine aggregates. Reference, recycled concretes have same cement content, similar workability and compressive strength requirement, proven experimentally. RCA is sourced from pre-fab element discards of a Swedish plant, the logistical alternatives requiring environmental impact analysis. Alternatives are RCA crushing at plant and crushing at a different location including transportation. LCA shows transportation is second largest contributor after cement in all impact categories. RAC alternatives show lower total impact than reference concrete due to RCA replacement. A circularity index for concrete based on economic value of recirculated aggregates; supplements LCA for sustainability reporting. Circularity index results: RAC100 > RAC50 > RC. Combining circularity index with LCA helps optimize recycling process with regard to amount of recycled material and logistics respectively.

Keywords
Concrete recycling, recycled aggregate, LCA, circular economy, sustainability, LIFE-CYCLE ASSESSMENT, HYDRATED CEMENT
National Category
Construction Management Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-27666 (URN)10.1080/21650373.2021.2004562 (DOI)000743439500001 ()2-s2.0-85122887571 (Scopus ID)
Note

Times Cited in Web of Science Core Collection: 0 Total Times Cited: 0 Cited Reference Count: 38

Available from: 2022-03-21 Created: 2022-03-21 Last updated: 2024-01-16Bibliographically approved
Nemat, B., Razzaghi, M., Bolton, K. & Rousta, K. (2023). Design-Based Approach to Support Sorting Behavior of Food Packaging. Clean Technologies, 5(1), 297-328
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design-Based Approach to Support Sorting Behavior of Food Packaging
2023 (English)In: Clean Technologies, E-ISSN 2571-8797, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 297-328Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is widely acknowledged that environmental impacts from packaging waste depend on how consumers sort this waste fraction. In this research, “design for sustainable behavior” (DfSB) strategies are used to improve a cream packaging design that can support proper sorting of packaging waste as a sustainable behavior. The application of three DfSB strategies—“match”, “steer”, and “force”—was examined through circular interviews and practical experience with two groups of participants in Karlskrona, Sweden. Prototyping was used to provide a more realistic experiment and enhance communication during the interviews. The results show that consumer-packaging interaction during the usage phase is important to enhance proper sorting behavior. The results also show the potential of a user-centered design-based approach to study consumer-packaging interaction and to understand the challenges faced by users when sorting packaging waste. It also shows the possibility of packaging design to script consumer behavior and reveals details that are important when designing packaging that was not known. In this vein, packaging form, color, and haptic attributes are the most influential design attributes that can support packaging functionalities and script consumer sorting behavior.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
packaging design, packaging waste, sustainable behavior, sorting packaging waste, packaging functionality, emotional factor, haptic attributes
National Category
Design
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-29838 (URN)10.3390/cleantechnol5010017 (DOI)000983323200001 ()2-s2.0-85151084410 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-25 Created: 2023-05-25 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Moshtaghian, H., Bolton, K. & Rousta, K. (2023). Public preferences for nutritional, environmental and food safety characteristics of upcycled foods in Sweden. International journal of food science & technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Public preferences for nutritional, environmental and food safety characteristics of upcycled foods in Sweden
2023 (English)In: International journal of food science & technology, ISSN 0950-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2621Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study investigates people's preferences for nutritional, environmental and food safety characteristics of upcycled foods according to their age group and assesses the association between age and the importance of these characteristics in a Swedish population. A food choice questionnaire was used for data collection, and 681 Swedish residents aged ≥18 years participated in this study. In young, middle-aged and older adults, environmental (environmentally friendly preparation and packaging, local production and contribution to food waste reduction) and food safety (absence of additives, chemicals, genetically modified ingredients and contamination) characteristics of upcycled foods were more important than most nutritional characteristics (low energy and fat content and high fibre and protein content). There was a positive association between age and the importance score of nutritional characteristics, such as rich in vitamins and minerals, low energy and fat content and minimal food processing (P-value < 0.05). A negative association was observed between age and the importance score of contribution to food waste reduction (P-value = 0.014). There was a positive association between age and the importance score of food safety characteristics, such as the absence of additives, chemicals and genetically modified ingredients (P-value < 0.05). Therefore, the environmental benefits and food safety aspects of upcycled foods can be considered for product development and marketing to facilitate the acceptability of these foods in all age groups. Since the nutritional attributes of upcycled foods were less important than their environmental and food safety characteristics, strategies should be introduced to educate people regarding desirable nutritional features to enable them to choose healthy upcycled foods. 

Keywords
consumer preferences, environmental benefits, food safety, food sustainability, nutritional value, public perception, sustainable consumption, upcycled food
National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-30358 (URN)10.1111/ijfs.16588 (DOI)001045101700001 ()2-s2.0-85167707991 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-21 Created: 2023-08-21 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Hellwig, C., Taherzadeh, M. J., Bolton, K., Lundin, M., Häggblom-Kronlöf, G. & Rousta, K. (2022). Aspects that Affect Tasting Studies of Emerging Food: A Review. Future Foods, 5, Article ID 100109.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aspects that Affect Tasting Studies of Emerging Food: A Review
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2022 (English)In: Future Foods, ISSN 2666-8335, Vol. 5, article id 100109Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Providing food security to the growing global population, and the resource depletion associated with current food systems, let to calls for more sustainable food sources. Food that can be produced in a sustainable way (taking all three aspects of sustainable development into consideration) is currently emerging in Western societies. Through tastings, insight can be gathered not only into sensory characteristics but also other aspects that aid innovation and development of food. The current study identified aspects that can affect tastings of emerging food by reviewing relevant literature. General aspects; meat alternatives; ingredients or processing technologies; information, prior knowledge and (un)familiarity; taste and liking; emotional factors; and willingness to engage with emerging food can affect tastings of emerging food. Awareness of the effect that these aspects can have on methodological considerations and results can be constructive in future research that use tastings as a platform to develop new and emerging food. The findings are significant for food science in terms of cornerstones towards potential industrial applications. These include innovating new types of food, assessing most effective technologies in the context of such food, developing new products, and understanding engagement with emerging food products.

Keywords
Alternative food, Sustainable development, Food acceptance, Algae, Entomology, Filamentous fungi
National Category
Social Sciences Agricultural and Veterinary sciences Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-27110 (URN)10.1016/j.fufo.2021.100109 (DOI)001097481400006 ()2-s2.0-85121980951 (Scopus ID)
Funder
European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), 20201656
Available from: 2021-12-28 Created: 2021-12-28 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Nemat, B., Razzaghi, M., Bolton, K. & Rousta, K. (2022). Design affordance of plastic food packaging for consumer sorting behavior. Resources, Conservation and Recycling, 177
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design affordance of plastic food packaging for consumer sorting behavior
2022 (English)In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 177Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This research aims to understand why consumers miss-sort plastic food packaging and to what extent the design affordance of packaging can influence consumer sorting behavior. A photo-based observation study and semi-structured interviews were used to gain a deeper understanding of the miss-sorting behavior and how it could be affected by design affordance. This explorative study suggested that the packaging form, size, durability, haptic aspects, and visual communicative properties influence how consumers perceive the value of packaging. This is important, because packaging with low attributed values are not considered worth recycling or correctly sorted and are more likely to be miss-sorted. Hence, a well-afforded food packaging design is expected to improve how consumers perceive the value of packaging and to consequently improve sorting behavior.

Keywords
Household waste, Packaging waste, Plastic food packaging, Waste separation, Design affordance, PRODUCT, PERCEPTIONS, SUSTAINABILITY, METHODOLOGY, DISTORTION
National Category
Social Sciences Engineering and Technology Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-26917 (URN)10.1016/j.resconrec.2021.105949 (DOI)000708347000001 ()2-s2.0-85117136701 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-11-19 Created: 2021-11-19 Last updated: 2023-02-20Bibliographically approved
Hellwig, C., Rousta, N., Wikandari, R., Taherzadeh, M. J., Häggblom-Kronlöf, G., Bolton, K. & Rousta, K. (2022). Household fermentation of leftover bread to nutritious food. Waste Management, 150, 39-47
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Household fermentation of leftover bread to nutritious food
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2022 (English)In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 150, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Resource dependency of food production is aggravated when food is wasted. In Sweden, it is estimated that 37% of the total bread waste is generated at the household level. This work aimed to assess whether fermentation using edible filamentous fungi at households can provide a solution to valorize leftover bread in the production of fungi-based food for consumption. Bread was fermented in household and laboratory conditions with Neurospora intermedia and Rhizopus oligosporus. The results show that bread can be successfully and easily fermented at households, without signs of microbial contamination even though the conditions were not sterile. Fermentation at the household resulted in higher protein, fat and fiber content as well as greater starch reduction compared to the samples fermented under laboratory conditions. Household engagement in bread fermentation will likely depend on values that motivate reusing leftover bread. Perceived values that are expected to motivate engagement vary across individuals, but may include improved nutritional benefits, food waste prevention, convenience, responsibilities, and being part of sustainable societies and actions.

Keywords
Waste prevention, Food loss, Functional food, Filamentous fungi, Circular economy, Sustainability, Food security
National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-28888 (URN)10.1016/j.wasman.2022.06.038 (DOI)000873370300005 ()2-s2.0-85133278449 (Scopus ID)
Funder
European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), 20201656
Available from: 2022-11-07 Created: 2022-11-07 Last updated: 2023-04-18Bibliographically approved
Moshtaghian, H., Bolton, K. & Rousta, K. (2021). Challenges for Upcycled Foods: Definition, Inclusion in the Food Waste Management Hierarchy and Public Acceptability. Foods, 10(11)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges for Upcycled Foods: Definition, Inclusion in the Food Waste Management Hierarchy and Public Acceptability
2021 (English)In: Foods, E-ISSN 2304-8158, Vol. 10, no 11Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Upcycled foods contain unmarketable ingredients (e.g., damaged food produce, by-products and scraps from food preparation) that otherwise would not be directed for human consumption. Upcycled food is a new food category and thus faces several challenges, such as definition development, inclusion in the food waste management hierarchy and public acceptability. This review provides an overview of these three challenges. The upcycled food definitions have been developed for research, food manufacturers, and multi-stakeholders use. Thus, there is a need for a consumer-friendly definition for the general public. A simplified definition is proposed to introduce these foods as environmentally friendly foods containing safe ingredients that otherwise would not have gone to human consumption such as damaged food produce, by-products and scraps from food preparation. Moreover, an updated version of the food waste management hierarchy has been proposed by including the production of upcycled foods as a separate waste management action that is less preferable than redistribution but more favourable than producing animal feed. Furthermore, consumer sociodemographic characteristics and beliefs, as well as food quality cues and attributes, were identified as crucial factors for the public acceptability of these foods. Future research should address these challenges to facilitate the introduction of upcycled foods.

Keywords
upcycled food, waste to value food, value-added surplus food, valorised food, food waste management hierarchy, GLYCEMIC INDEX, TO-VALUE, QUALITY, PRICE, HEALTH, QUANTIFICATION, ATTRIBUTE, CONTEXT, SCALE, APPLE
National Category
Food Science Food Engineering
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-27016 (URN)10.3390/foods10112874 (DOI)000725260400001 ()2-s2.0-85119914645 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-12-13 Created: 2021-12-13 Last updated: 2023-05-11Bibliographically approved
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