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Mattila, Heikki
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Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Hernández, N. (2018). A Systematic Model for Improving Theoretical Garment Fit. Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, 22(4), 527-539
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Systematic Model for Improving Theoretical Garment Fit
2018 (English)In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 527-539Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use a systematic model for detecting misfit between the garment and the target group.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an empirical–analytical methodology, the systematic model was tested. The input data were run through the model to generate the output data, which were analysed, including basic statistics. The purpose of the analysis was to detect misfit and improve the garment measurement chart. This procedure was repeated until a clear result was reached.

Findings

The result of this study is an optimised garment measurement chart, which considers the garment’s ease, different sizes/proportions in relation to a target group. The results show that it is possible to use a systematic model to define the shortcomings of a garment´s range of sizes and proportions.

Research limitations/implications

Further studies are needed to verify the results of the theoretical garment fit and their values in relation to real garment fit.

Practical implications

If the systematic model is implemented to improve the theoretical garment fit, this may have effects on the available garment sizes and its proportions, resulting in increased theoretical garment fit for the target group.

Originality/value

The paper presents a systematic model for detecting and eliminating theoretical fitting; the model includes both garment ease allowance and defined points of misfit.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2018
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15008 (URN)10.1108/JFMM-10-2017-0112 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-08-21 Created: 2018-08-21 Last updated: 2018-11-30Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, J., Gwilt, A., Larsson, J., Mattila, H., Pal, R., Torstensson, H. & Lidström, A. (2017). Feasibility of conditional design: Organizing a circular textile value chain by design principles.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feasibility of conditional design: Organizing a circular textile value chain by design principles
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2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Series
Re:textile Feasibility Series
National Category
Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials Economics and Business Design
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General); Textiles and Fashion (Design); Business and IT
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21867 (URN)978-91-88838-56-8 (ISBN)978-91-88838-55-1 (ISBN)
Projects
Re:textile
Funder
Region Västra Götaland
Available from: 2019-10-20 Created: 2019-10-20 Last updated: 2019-10-21Bibliographically approved
Mattila, H. (2016). Digital fashion - how and when?. In: : . Paper presented at The 8th International textile, clothing & design conference - Magic World of Textiles (ITC&DC),Dubrovnik, October 2-5, 2016.. Dubrovnik, Croatia
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital fashion - how and when?
2016 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Virtual Reality and 3D systems are widely in use in many industries, both for design and marketing. Automobiles are designed by 3D systems, and the same images are further used in sales promotion and also in sales configurations. 3D design systems are also used by several fashion companies. But only a few go beyond that and present virtual products in web sites and in configurator applications like the famous Sales Wall by Adidas, which is regarded to be the company at the forefront in virtualization in fashion.

3D software solutions are widely available. Lectra offers tools for designers while Browzwear, Optitex and Clo3D go further by integrating the 3D designs to sales configuration solutions including moving avatars. The Korean golf wear manufacturer Elrod organizes virtual cat walks for presenting their garments, where nothing, i.e. models (avatars), garments, cat walk and scenery, is real. The visual quality of avatars and garments improves continuously. Furthermore, such systems make customized e commerce possible.

The aim of the recently completed Horizon 2020 funded project 'fromROLLtoBAG' was to create an integrated consumer driven local production system with the help of virtual design and digital manufacturing. Consumers connected with mobile devices can customize the avatar, insert own measurements and virtually try on garments from suppliers’ collection. Once done the order is transferred to a local manufacturer which with digital printing, cutting and unit assembly produces the product and ships to the customer in one day. Besides offering digital market place to brand companies, the objective of the project was to bring garment production back to Europe.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dubrovnik, Croatia: , 2016
Keywords
Digital sales and manufacturing, consumer driven local production, virtual design, digital sales configurations, digital fashion
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-11048 (URN)
Conference
The 8th International textile, clothing & design conference - Magic World of Textiles (ITC&DC),Dubrovnik, October 2-5, 2016.
Available from: 2016-10-18 Created: 2016-10-18 Last updated: 2016-10-26Bibliographically approved
Pal, R., Torstensson, H. & Mattila, H. (2014). Antecedents of organizational resilience in economic crises: an empirical study of Swedish textile and clothing SMEs. International Journal of Production Economics, 147, 410-428
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antecedents of organizational resilience in economic crises: an empirical study of Swedish textile and clothing SMEs
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 147, p. 410-428Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Economic recessions have created challenges for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and contributed to disruptions requiring them to be resilient. At times of economic crises, SMEs face major threats to their financial performance and ultimately to their survival. The average number of Swedish textile and clothing (T&C) firms that went bankrupt during the recent crisis (2007–09) escalated twofold compared to the average over 2000–10. Following the 1990s economic crisis nearly 12 per cent of the T&C companies went bankrupt in 1994–95. The structural industrial statistics also plummeted in these crisis years, aggravating many internal problems in SMEs as a ripple effect. This study concentrates on the constraints faced by Swedish textile-related SMEs, primarily during the economic crises of the past two decades (1990–93 and end 2007–09), and identifying the antecedents and their different degrees of influence on economic resilience. It also deepens the understanding of the underlying patterns in the antecedents, observed in SMEs, favouring or inhibiting resilience due to their significance or deficit, respectively. The paper adopts an exploratory research conducted in two phases, first through a survey and followed by a series of interviews, responded by eight Swedish T&C SMEs. Annual reports provide a detailed account of the financial performances of these firms. A conceptual resilience framework was developed earlier, based on a review of extant literature. Findings provide insight on how the responding firms considered resourcefulness, viz. cash flow and investment finance, relational networks and material assets, along with ‘dynamic competitiveness’ through strategic and operational flexibility to be key enablers of resilience and financial performance, mostly through generation of profitability, cash flow/liquidity and sales turnover. Responses also highlighted the indirect influence of the ‘soft’ learning and cultural aspects like attentive leadership and collectiveness on economic resilience, considered tacit and ingrained in small or medium-sized family businesses. Additional process initiatives, in particular growth and continuity strategies, were also emergent patterns to properly utilize and direct the antecedents for resilience development. These are beneficial for firms to understand the key areas, in which to invest for developing resilient business models.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Resilience, Crisis, Small and medium-sized enterprise, SME, Textile and clothing, Sweden, Organizational Resilience
National Category
Economics and Business Business Administration
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1779 (URN)10.1016/j.ijpe.2013.02.031 (DOI)000329880300021 ()2320/13242 (Local ID)2320/13242 (Archive number)2320/13242 (OAI)
Note

Part B, Special Issue: Building Supply Chain System Capabilities in the Age of Global Complexity: Emerging Theories and Practices

Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Hernández, N., Mattila, H. & Berglin, L. (2014). Garment fit by numbers: Statistical identification of a garment's misfit. In: : . Paper presented at Ambience14, 7-9 September, Tampere, Finland. Tampere University of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Garment fit by numbers: Statistical identification of a garment's misfit
2014 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A challenge for manufacturers of garments is to decide which sizes to make available for a potential target group. Mismatches between the garment’s sizes/proportions and a target group will decrease its fit and increase loss of sales. The purpose of this study is to develop a systematic model to identify and optimize the distribution of a garment’s sizes and proportions in order to provide a target group appropriate fit. This study is based on sample-garment measurements, experienced-based values and data containing body measurements of 2208 individuals. Statistical data from the case were analysed to find a model to detect mismatches between standard garments and a target group. The results show that it is possible to use a systematic model to define the shortcomings of a garment´s range of sizes and proportions. If implemented, this could have effects on the available garment sizes and its proportions, resulting an increased garment fit for a target group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Tampere University of Technology, 2014
Keywords
garment fit, standard sizes, evaluation of fit, anthropometric, systematic model
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-7300 (URN)2320/14601 (Local ID)978-952-15-3269-6 (ISBN)2320/14601 (Archive number)2320/14601 (OAI)
Conference
Ambience14, 7-9 September, Tampere, Finland
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Guo, L., Berglin, L., Wiklund, U. & Mattila, H. (2013). Design of a Garments-Based Sensing System for Breathing Monitoring. Textile research journal, 85(No 5), 499-509
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design of a Garments-Based Sensing System for Breathing Monitoring
2013 (English)In: Textile research journal, ISSN 0040-5175, E-ISSN 1746-7748, Vol. 85, no No 5, p. 499-509Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The long-term monitoring of biophysiological signals requires new types of sensor systems that are wearable and at the same time convenient for the users. This paper describes the design of a novel garment-based sensing system for the long-term monitoring of breathing rhythm. The system concept was realized in a prototype garment, integrated with coated piezoresistive sensors. The prototype garment was tested by five subjects, and compared with a standard piezoelectric respiratory belt. Each signal was quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated in the time and frequency domain to make sure that no medical and diagnostic information was lost. The results showed a good agreement between the garment-based sensors and the standard reference, where errors occurred only when the breathing rate was extremely high. The garment-based sensor system could also distinguish the predominance breathing compartment (chest versus abdominal breathing). The system could detect a 10 s pause in breathing, which could be of importance in studies of sleep apnea. A garment-based sensing system maintains the accuracy of the signal quality without reducing the comfort for the user. It makes possible long-term ambulatory monitoring and has home-based healthcare applications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications Ltd., 2013
Keywords
Smart Textiles
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences Other Computer and Information Science
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1781 (URN)10.1177/0040517512444336 (DOI)000317933200006 ()2320/13246 (Local ID)2320/13246 (Archive number)2320/13246 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Mustonen, M., Pal, R., Mattila, H. & Mashkoor, Y. (2013). Success indicators in various fashion business models. Journal of Global Fashion Marketing, 4(2), 74-92
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Success indicators in various fashion business models
2013 (English)In: Journal of Global Fashion Marketing, ISSN 2093-2685, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 74-92Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this study was to analyze the business models of various fashion companies, based on their 2009 financial indicators, to understand how different operation models correlate with success and whether selected performance indicators monitor operational success. Based on their business models, the companies were classified as follows: brand retailers, brand marketers, luxury brands, and multi-brand retailers. Brand retailers with a high net profit margin and a rapid turnover of inventory were significantly more profitable than traditional multi-brand retailers. Luxury brand companies were another successful group. Though their stockturn was low, their net profit was high because of their unique design and high brand value. Brand marketers could adapt well to rapid changes, because their business was primarily based on intangible assets. Furthermore, multi-brand retailers showed the lowest financial ratios because of their slow stockturn and low net profit margin.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Asia Pacific, 2013
Keywords
fashion business model, clothing, financial indicators, success factors, value chain, Textile management
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1562 (URN)10.1080/20932685.2013.763476 (DOI)2320/12284 (Local ID)2320/12284 (Archive number)2320/12284 (OAI)
Note

Sponsorship:

KELANO Project - TUT FInland

Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2018-02-17Bibliographically approved
Pal, R., Aneja, A., Torstensson, H., Militky, J., Mattila, H., Havalka, A. & Kus, Z. (2013). The quest for continual growth in textiles: innovation diversity and organizational resiliency. In: Proceedings of the 13th AUTEX conference, 22-24 May 2013, Dresden, Germany: . Paper presented at AUTEX World Textile Conference, Dresden, 22-24 may, 2013. AUTEX World Textile Conference 2013
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The quest for continual growth in textiles: innovation diversity and organizational resiliency
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2013 (English)In: Proceedings of the 13th AUTEX conference, 22-24 May 2013, Dresden, Germany, AUTEX World Textile Conference 2013 , 2013Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The looming spectre of decline of the man-made fibre industry in US, Europe and Japan has been exacerbated by several problems like intense global cost pressure, fibre and raw material shortages, oil price volatility challenges etc. All of these have contributed to sluggish growth and higher bankruptcies. Resiliency in such a context has become a prerequisite for leading long term business prosperity fuelled by diverse technological innovations. In this paper, the authors have investigated an inexorable phenomenon of quantifying and correlating innovation and business resiliency from annual financial data for DuPont, as a case, over a span of five decades. The findings are manifold. The financial impact of blockbuster products based on disruptive technologies takes over a decade to yield results while contributions from sustaining innovations are swift. Both types of innovations are necessary. Incremental innovations delay product maturity with concomitant investments in costly and risky blockbuster product developments. From DuPont’s perspective, the company showed explosive growth from 1970-90, primarily fuelled by the rapid introduction of products with long product lifecycle developed during 1950-1965. However, DuPont performance started to indicate declining resiliency even while increasing investments in innovation, from 1960-2010. This is possibly due to change in product portfolio from commodity to specialty orientation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AUTEX World Textile Conference 2013, 2013
Keywords
textile, innovation, resiliency, Altman’s Zeta-score, DuPont, growth, Resilience and Innovation
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-7008 (URN)2320/12595 (Local ID)978-3-86780-343-4 (ISBN)2320/12595 (Archive number)2320/12595 (OAI)
Conference
AUTEX World Textile Conference, Dresden, 22-24 may, 2013
Note

Sponsorship:

F3

Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22 Last updated: 2017-10-24Bibliographically approved
Guo, L., Berglin, L. & Mattila, H. (2012). Improvement of Electro-Mechanical Properties of Strain Sensors made of elastic-conductive hybrid yarns. Textile research journal, 82(19), 1937-1947
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improvement of Electro-Mechanical Properties of Strain Sensors made of elastic-conductive hybrid yarns
2012 (English)In: Textile research journal, ISSN 0040-5175, E-ISSN 1746-7748, Vol. 82, no 19, p. 1937-1947Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fabric-based strain sensors have been developed using different technologies, among which flat knitting is one of the most effective and economical methods. However, knitted strain sensors are not often used in practical applications because the sensors usually exhibit large elastic hysteresis when they are deformed and subjected to stress during application. One possible approach to overcome these shortcomings is to introduce elastic properties at the yarn level by combining the conductive materials with elastic materials. In this paper, we demostrate a hybrid yarn made of a conductive yarn that winds around an elastic core yarn in a direct twisting device. The electro-mechanical properties of strain sensors knitted from the hybrid yarns were tested in order to characterize the sensors. This study consisted of two stages: the yarn preparation and the sensor characterization. In the first stage, two kinds of elastic core components (polyamide/Lycra and polyamide) and two kinds of conductive winding yarns (Bekinox BK50/1 and Bekinox BK50/2) were selected for twisting. The twisting was done with a constant twisting speed and four different numbers of twists. Mechanical properties, that is, the tenacity, force at break and elongation at break, were tested in order to determine the optimal parameters for producing the hybrid yarns. The results indicated that among the tested yarns those with a polyamide core and Bekinox BK50/1 winding yarns at 450 twist/meter and with a polyamide/Lycra core and Bekinox BK 50/2 winding yarns at 600 twist/meter had the best properties. These were thus selected as the materials for producing knitted strain sensors. In the second stage, electro-mechanical properties of the knitted strain sensors were determined under tensile stress and multi-cyclic tensile stress. The results show that the hybrid yarns can effectively enhance the

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Journals, 2012
Keywords
smart textiles, Knitted strain sensor, sensor, hybrid yarn, electro-mechanical, elasticity, conductive, Textile technology
National Category
Materials Engineering Other Humanities
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1407 (URN)10.1177/0040517512452931 (DOI)000310298000001 ()2320/11710 (Local ID)2320/11710 (Archive number)2320/11710 (OAI)
Note

Sponsorship:

Smart Textile

Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Larsson, J., Peterson, J. & Mattila, H. (2012). The Knit on Demand Supply Chain. AUTEX Research Journal, 12(3), 67-75
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Knit on Demand Supply Chain
2012 (English)In: AUTEX Research Journal, ISSN 1470-9589, E-ISSN 2300-0929, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 67-75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As customers’ tastes become more differentiated, so must companies’ offerings evolve. The demand for variety may soon become unmanageable, and several companies are addressing this trend by adopting a system of mass customisation. One project, Knit on Demand, has been conducted by the Swedish School of Textiles in close collaboration with a knitting company and a retailer of tailored fashion in Stockholm. Production and sales of customised products pose logistical challenges for the companies involved, including the one-piece flow through almost the entire supply chain and the demand for short lead times in an otherwise slow environment, adding to the cost of manufacturing mass customised garments. Customisation has logistical benefits such as minimized inventory; hence, high inventory turnover and the possibility of fast response to meet customer demand. The Knit on Demand concept can be considered as leagile because it comprises both lean and agile components. It is lean in the manufacturing stage upstream and agile downstream to better respond to customer demand on the market.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Versita, 2012
Keywords
mass customisation, supply chain management, fashion logistics, knitwear, demand driven, agile, lean, leagile
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1467 (URN)10.2478/v10304-012-0013-9 (DOI)000208846700001 ()2320/11872 (Local ID)2320/11872 (Archive number)2320/11872 (OAI)
Note

Sponsorship:

KK-stiftelsen

Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2017-12-01
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