Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Kristensen Johnstone, TonjeORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3966-7833
Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Kristensen Johnstone, T. (2019). Electroluminescent Textiles. In: Material District: . Paper presented at MaterialDistrict.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Electroluminescent Textiles
2019 (English)In: Material District, 2019Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

In this research, the aim was to explore the materiality of light through a textile design perspective. Print designs were developed with textile printing methodology, using multiple screens and blending ink colours through mixing and overprinting. This is in contrast to existing electroluminescent panels, which typically use single-colour prints with clear graphic shapes.

These electroluminescent prints consist of a transparent electrode, printed first in pattern with a phosphor paste, then a ceramic dielectric layer, and finally a second electrode. When alternating current is applied through the electrodes, the phosphor illuminates.

Sample one emphasises the clarity of a single screen phosphor print, but is printed using a blend of two colours of phosphor ink, usually used unmixed. The scratchy detail of the knit pattern adds texture and depth.

Sample two takes advantage of the blue phosphor’s translucency, creating a three-colour print using only two screens through overlapping and blending. The design is based on a twill weave, and, rather than the clean edges of typical electroluminescent printing, embraces the speckled background as a pattern element. The alignment of the two layers of the printed pattern lends a visual depth to the result, in contrast to the flatness of sample one.

The pattern in sample three is created by rasterising and combining images of two knitted textiles. The use of two complementary colours in the print amplifies the raster, creating a visual vibration that keeps the eye moving over the pattern surface.

National Category
Design
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21764 (URN)
Conference
MaterialDistrict
Available from: 2019-09-24 Created: 2019-09-24 Last updated: 2019-10-08Bibliographically approved
Kristensen Johnstone, T. (2019). Sample collection exhibition: Photocromic weave.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sample collection exhibition: Photocromic weave
2019 (English)Other, Exhibition catalogue (Refereed) [Artistic work]
National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21768 (URN)
Available from: 2019-09-24 Created: 2019-09-24 Last updated: 2019-10-08Bibliographically approved
Kristensen Johnstone, T. (2019). Spatial definers in surface pattern design – introducing alternative design variables as tools in the textile design process. In: : . Paper presented at Futurescan 4: Valuing practice.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spatial definers in surface pattern design – introducing alternative design variables as tools in the textile design process
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

Spatial definers in surface pattern design – introducing alternative design variables as tools in the textile design process

 

Within the field of textile design, the understanding of surface patterns is fundamental knowledge and a somewhat specific professional skill. The purpose here is to report on experiments explicitly introducing abstract spatial definers, such as “above”, “behind” etc., in the textile design process as basic surface pattern variables.

 

This idea was tested out in student workshops on four (five) different European art and design universities during a period of three months. The primary focus of the workshops was to test surface patterns as spatial definers, by introducing a design variable that answers the question “what is the pattern doing as a space definer?”.

 

The results of the workshops demonstrated a potential of using conceptual spatial determinations as design variables, as the design solutions were clearly influenced by the introduction of these variables. In addition to adding to the knowledge of the field, the results can be used by designers who seek alternative working methods, or as material for reflection and inspiration when teaching surface pattern design in design education programmes.

 

Using workshops in teaching is a means of gaining valuable insights and learning in creative practice. Transforming this knowledge into teaching methods and pedagogical tools would allow methods and ideas to be re-thought, and unconventional ways of surface pattern design thinking to be explored. This paper contributes to the development of design methods and provides an alternative perspective on surface pattern design. It also highlights a small area that is rarely in focus in textile design research.

National Category
Design
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21766 (URN)
Conference
Futurescan 4: Valuing practice
Available from: 2019-09-24 Created: 2019-09-24 Last updated: 2019-10-08Bibliographically approved
Kristensen Johnstone, T. (2018). Conceptual spatial determinations insurface pattern design: Introducing alternative design variables as tools in the design process.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptual spatial determinations insurface pattern design: Introducing alternative design variables as tools in the design process
2018 (English)Other (Other academic) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

What is the function of a surface pattern? What does it do when we use it?

They have practical and decorative functions depending on the context in which they appear; they may be used on a carpet, incorporated into wallpaper, or placed in a car interior. Surface patterns are also carriers of form, colour, and narrative, and are able to affect rooms, spaces, and surfaces – an important consideration. On a more abstract level surface patterns act as spatial definers; contributing to define a space with its directions, planes and perspectives. This introduces a design variable in the design process that answers the question “what is the pattern doing as a space definer?”.

 This workshop introduces spatial determination as a design variable. The question is how this affect your way of working in the process of designing a surface pattern?

National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14214 (URN)
Available from: 2018-05-21 Created: 2018-05-21 Last updated: 2018-07-04Bibliographically approved
Kristensen Johnstone, T. (2017). Surface patterns, spatiality and pattern relations in textile design. (Licentiate dissertation). Borås: Högskolan i Borås
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surface patterns, spatiality and pattern relations in textile design
2017 (English)Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

This licentiate thesis focuses on surface patterns, spatiality, and pattern relations in textile design, and aims to explore surface patterns as spatial definers and what they mean in the context of surface patterns. A secondary focus relates to applying conceptual spatial determinations as alternative design variables in design processes, and exploring how these could be used to define and analyse pattern relations.

Through a series of exploratory design experiments that used printed and projected surface patterns in a three-dimensional setting, which were documented using photographs and film, the notion of pattern relations, wherein scale was used as a design variable, was explored. The outcome of the experiments showed the expressional possibilities that surface patterns may provide in a defined space, and how these are connected to pattern relations. In order to encourage an accompanying discussion regarding alternative methods of analysing surface patterns, the construction of a theoretical model was initiated. Workshops with design students were used as another practical method in this work.

The results showed that there is great potential in using conceptual spatial determinations to define pattern relations by viewing surface patterns as spatial definers, rather than taking a traditional perspective on their functions. Another outcome is the theoretical model, which proposes a specific approach to pattern relations.

This research demonstrates how conceptual spatial determinations can benefit the textile design process, as well as design teaching, which could in turn provide the field with new expressions that may lead to a change in or fruitful addition to the practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Borås: Högskolan i Borås, 2017. p. 349
Series
University of Borås studies in artistic research ; 22
Keywords
Surface patterns, textile design, spatiality, spatial definers, design variables, pattern relations, conceptual spatial determinations
National Category
Design
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12987 (URN)978-91-88269-53-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-11-14 Created: 2017-11-14 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Kristensen Johnstone, T. (2016). Alternative design methods in surface pattern design.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alternative design methods in surface pattern design
2016 (English)Other (Other academic) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

This workshop introduces an alternative design method to increase the understanding of using abstract, spatial design variables in the design process. How does it affect the way of working? In what way could an abstract design variable influence the physical designed outcome?

The aim of the workshop is to explore how concrete and abstract design variables is interpreted, understood and applied in the design process, as well as providing a discussion concerning this.

National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14213 (URN)
Available from: 2018-05-21 Created: 2018-05-21 Last updated: 2018-07-04Bibliographically approved
Kristensen Johnstone, T. & McCallum, D. (2016). In The Clouds: The workshop as a method of exploring the relationship between rules and pattern design. In: In The Clouds: The workshop as a method of exploring the relationship between rules and pattern design: . Paper presented at Artistic research: Is there some method? Prague, Czech Republic, 7-9 April, 2016 (pp. 11).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In The Clouds: The workshop as a method of exploring the relationship between rules and pattern design
2016 (English)In: In The Clouds: The workshop as a method of exploring the relationship between rules and pattern design, 2016, p. 11-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

Surface pattern is a fundamental component of human expression, especially in textile design. It is often influenced by patterning in nature, structures that are also often easily described by mathematical principles. This paper presents the workshop as a method for exploring the relationship between rules and pattern. A workshop was conducted with textile- and fashion design students to test two assumptions: Design guided by rules would create a recognisable pattern, and, Visual patterns would easily be reducible to rules. The aim was to explore the relationship between pattern and rules in design processes, and to provide a foundation for reflection and critical discussion of this relationship. The results of the workshop could not reliably prove either assumption because, as was discovered through the workshop, the concepts of pattern and rules are neither universal nor obvious, and as such cannot be so simply tested. Pattern and rules are varied and nuanced phenomena and their relationship equally so.

National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14211 (URN)
Conference
Artistic research: Is there some method? Prague, Czech Republic, 7-9 April, 2016
Available from: 2018-05-21 Created: 2018-05-21 Last updated: 2018-06-21Bibliographically approved
Kristensen Johnstone, T. (2016). Spatial determinations in surface pattern design.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spatial determinations in surface pattern design
2016 (English)Other (Other academic) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

Surface pattern and ornaments has been around us for thousands of years. Pattern design and pattern making is and always has been an important human activity. Regardless of the cultural aspects that exist, there is a timeless systematic concerning pattern. It is all about the relationship between figure and background and the way the elements are organised on a surface. When designing pattern, different design variables are used in order to achieve a certain expression. Design variables are the designers ‘tools’, the extensional information needed to express intentions within a textile. A textile designer is presented with an almost endless number of design variables to handle in the design process. It could be colour, form, line, texture, volume etc. Designing surface patterns in spatial contexts with a totally different design variable could be challenging. What kind of thinking is required, what material to apply, and which type of expression do you wish to accomplish?

This workshop introduces alternative design variables as tools in the design process. How does it affect the textile design process if abstract spatial determinations are employed as a design variable?

National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14212 (URN)
Available from: 2018-05-21 Created: 2018-05-21 Last updated: 2018-07-04Bibliographically approved
Kristensen Johnstone, T. (2015). Workshop of Rules.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Workshop of Rules
2015 (English)Other (Other academic) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

All kinds of patterns deals with rules. In fact, rules are surrounding us everywhere from traffic rules to instructions on what to wear on the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony. In this workshop we examine the notion of pattern, and how design students relate to rules and pattern, and to ideas that we think are fundamental to pattern design.

National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14210 (URN)
Available from: 2018-05-21 Created: 2018-05-21 Last updated: 2018-07-04Bibliographically approved
Kristensen Johnstone, T. (2014). Surface pattern and spatiality.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surface pattern and spatiality
2014 (English)Other (Other academic) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

To investigate the relationships between surface pattern, spatiality and scale from the perspective of textile design. The research interest focuses on the explorations of textile patterns and spatiality, it also concerns documenting this as materials to simplify the understanding and designing of textile patterns in a spatial context.

Publisher
p. 5
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14208 (URN)
Available from: 2018-05-21 Created: 2018-05-21 Last updated: 2018-07-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3966-7833

Search in DiVA

Show all publications