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Player-Koro, Catarina, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4178-4609
Alternative names
Biography [eng]

My main research interest includes critical sociological studies of educational technology and educational policy studies, with a special interest in teachers work and teacher education. I am currently active in research in the policy fields in studies on policy network formations, connecting public and commercial interests and actors within IT education policy an in investigating the policy effects of the implementation of career pathways for teachers, in Swedish schools.

 

Current research projects:

Utvald eller bortvald- ett yrke i förändring. En studie av karriärstegsreformen och lärarlönelyftet (Finansierat av Institutet for arbetsmarknads- och utbildningspolitisk utvärderingI) (Selected or discontinued profession in change. A study of the Career Services Reform and the Teacher Raise)
Teachers' digital work - (in)balance between demands and support? (Funded by Forte)
Investigation of the influence of private actors on national policymaking in Sweden.

Biography [swe]

Mitt övergripande forskningsområde är kritiska och sociologiska perspektiv på utbildning, policyfrågor och digitalisering. Min forskning handlar framförallt om att förstå samspelet mellan politisk styrning av utbildningssystemet och dess konsekvenser för lärarutbildning, lärares arbete, profession och undervisningspraktiker. Jag har specifikt studerat skolans digitalisering, dels hur globalisering, marknadifiering och neoliberal styrning av skola och utbildning möjliggjort för den privata IT-industrin att på olika sätt profitera på skolan men också hur digitala plattformar, infrastrukturer och datafiering påverkar undervisning, skolors arbete och förlängningen också utbildningssystem. Dessutom har jag forskat om konsekvenser av införande av förstelärare och lektorer för lärarprofessionen. 

Publications (10 of 76) Show all publications
Mellén, J., Angervall, P., Strömberg Jämsvi, S. & Player-Koro, C. (2023). Nu brister bubblan i den svenska lärarutbildningen. Stockholm: Dagens Nyheter
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nu brister bubblan i den svenska lärarutbildningen
2023 (Swedish)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [sv]

DN DEBATT 9/10.

Antalet studenter som vill bli lärare sjunker. Alla tycks vara överens om att det beror på dålig kvalitet på lärarutbildningarna. Men då missar man ett grundläggande faktum: det finns färre unga vuxna än för tio år sedan. De studenter vi så förtvivlat söker existerar inte, och nu hotas lärarutbildningarnas kvalitet på riktigt, skriver fyra experter på pedagogik.

Place, publisher, year, pages
Stockholm: Dagens Nyheter, 2023. p. 2
Keywords
Lärarutbildning, Studentantal
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-30624 (URN)
Available from: 2023-10-17 Created: 2023-10-17 Last updated: 2023-11-08Bibliographically approved
Player-Koro, C., Moriati, K. & Bergviken Rensfeldt, A. (2022). Production of knowledge of teachers’ professional work in the digital platforms infrastructures of schools: the problem of locating and defining the ethnographic field. In: : . Paper presented at Oxford Ethnography and Education Conference, 12-14 sept 2022, Oxford, United Kingdom.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Production of knowledge of teachers’ professional work in the digital platforms infrastructures of schools: the problem of locating and defining the ethnographic field
2022 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Constructing a field has always been a necessary and difficult task for ethnographers. As been argued by for instance by Burrell (2009), defining the nature and boundaries of an empirical field are key for the ethnographic process. In an effort to identify and bound fields and make ethnographies recognizable in relation to each other, a plethora of prefixes for the word ethnography have emerged. Types of ethnography have been minted such as critical- and institutional ethnography, and since the emergence of digital cultures attempts to define fields or approaches to ethnography as having specific characteristics have flourished (Hammersley, 2018). Prefixes such as digital, network and trace have emerged, indicating lineages from earlier forms of ethnography and attempts to articulate distinct sets of methods. In practice, however, many of these prefixes are used interchangeably and the differences between forms of ethnography can have little significance. One area that, distinctions between different forms of ethnography have significance, however, is in limiting or at least complicating the task of defining the kind of ethnography that one is engaged in as one works with an empirical situation that may not necessarily fit nicely in to one definition or another. One such situation is the focus of our work in a Swedish project that examines the possibilities and constraints in teachers’ work with a specific focus on how teachers regulate and are regulated by the digital infrastructure and technologies embedded both in schools and classrooms and in teachers’ everyday life outside school. Based on that situation, the aim of this paper is to examine the problem of locating and defining the empirical field in relation to different forms of ethnography.  

 

The backdrop for the study is the strong political and economic push for school digitization in Europe and other parts of the world. It forms part of a global technology market and platform economy where internet platform businesses make up the major part and reach into the core of schools’ everyday work. As a consequence, teachers’ now work in classrooms and schools that are inextricably embedded and inseparable to the employment of digital technologies. The ‘new’ normality of teachers is to be constantly connected to the schools’ digital systems that  has expanded teachers’ work across space and time and resulted in the creation of new digital work practices. 

 

Findings:

In our results we will present a reflexive critique of our own ethnographic engagement with school administrators, principals and teachers in Swedish upper secondary school. This involved collections of different kinds of policy, mapping of infrastructure, combined with participant observation, teachers’ self-report of online and offline work, interviews and focus-group interviews.

 

Contribution to education/ethnography:

Our intention is to make a contribution to the ongoing discussion of doing ethnography in the hybrid world where home and field are no longer neatly separated and where the distinction between on- and offline is blurred and overlapping.  

 

Burrell, J. (2009). The field site as a network: A strategy for locating ethnographic research. Field methods, 21(2), 181-199. 

 

Hammersley, M. (2018). What is ethnography? Can it survive? Should it?. Ethnography and Education, 13(1), 1-17. 

National Category
Pedagogy Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-29232 (URN)
Conference
Oxford Ethnography and Education Conference, 12-14 sept 2022, Oxford, United Kingdom
Available from: 2023-01-11 Created: 2023-01-11 Last updated: 2023-01-17Bibliographically approved
Player-Koro, C., Kiesewetter, S., Bergviken Rensfeldt, A. & Hillman, T. (2022). Teacher’s adaptation to cycles of digital platform procurement: tensions between local professional work and global imaginaries of efficiency and governance. In: : . Paper presented at Nordic Educational Research Association (NERA).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teacher’s adaptation to cycles of digital platform procurement: tensions between local professional work and global imaginaries of efficiency and governance
2022 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper examines cycles of digital platform procurement in the context of the marketized educational sector in Sweden. It focuses on how teachers’ work is structured by these cycles, the digital platforms they result in, and the political and administrative regulations that guide them. More specifically, our interest is in understanding the consequences of disruptions caused by the recurring periods of procurement and implementation that school administrations and teachers must adapt to. The purpose is to explore and problematize tensions including those between the functionalities and experiences promised by platform providers and those actually delivered, and those associated with the time and effort required to engage in the often complex and uncertain work of restructuring routines to the logics instantiated in a new digital platform. 

 

In the Swedish context, platform technology has increasingly taken on the role of an infrastructure, sociotechnically connecting clouds, software, people, and data (Plantin et al., 2018). This “platformization” comes with the business logic of platform capitalism (Srnicek, 2017), profiting on the individuals’ data production while positioned as making workplaces more efficient. While this logic has been well-articulated, research on how teachers’ working conditions and routines are changing in relation is relatively scarce (Bergviken Rensfeldt, Hillman, Selwyn, 2018; Selwyn, 2020; Selwyn, Nemorin & Johnson, 2017; Shulte, 2019).

    

This study builds on analyses of tensions that have already been identified in relation to school reforms more generally as existing between the regulating principles of market efficiency and governance and the working conditions in the teaching profession (Anderson & Cohen, 2015; Ball, 2003; Lundström & Parding, 2011). The analysis presented is situated in relation to a politico-economic push for school digitalization that has been a decades-long process, both on a global scale and within the Nordic countries. It contributes to the body of work showing how digital platforms such as Learning Management Systems commonly provided by global technology companies like Google and Microsoft restructure everyday workplace technologies in schools according to the imagery of global platform infrastructures.

 

As part of a larger project on digitalization and teachers’ working conditions, empirical material was collected through ethnographic engagement with school administrators and teachers in an upper secondary school while they became acquainted with and restructured their routines for a new Learning Management System. This involved policy and infrastructure ethnography, combined with participant observation and trace ethnography of teachers’ online and offline work.

 

Previous findings from the project show how digital platform infrastructures are embedded in and an influential part of teachers’ work occasioning changes and disruptions in their working conditions and routines. This study adds to these findings by showing how the economic logic of educational governance forces teachers in public schools to restructure their work routines to new platforms in cycles that comply with procurement laws, but may be in tension with their professional knowledge and pedagogical judgement.

 

National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-29246 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Educational Research Association (NERA)
Available from: 2023-01-11 Created: 2023-01-11 Last updated: 2023-01-17Bibliographically approved
Player-Koro, C., Jobér, A. & Bergviken Rensfeldt, A. (2021). De-politicised effects with networked governance?: An event ethnography study on education trade fairs. Ethnography and Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>De-politicised effects with networked governance?: An event ethnography study on education trade fairs
2021 (English)In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This paper explores educational trade fairs as part of the contemporary networked governance of public sector education. The focus is on the forms and functions of network governance in educational trade fairs and how different powers of private and public networking actors and ideas are played out, including the wider implications for education. Based on an event ethnographic case study of a Nordic educational technology fair, the study identifies three significant forms of how network governance powers are constituted: through consensual culture, blurred public-private actor roles, and market individualised addresses. Together this network governance has de-politicising effects that mask power imbalances and evoke democratic challenges for public sector education. The paper discusses how diffused market networking powers shape a national public education sector, and the forms of resistance and responsibilities within such governance. The merits of in-depth process-based event ethnography, which includes social media data, are raised and problematised.

Keywords
Education trade fairs, event ethnography, network governance, edtech industry, post-politics, POLICY, EUROPE
National Category
Public Administration Studies Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-26557 (URN)10.1080/17457823.2021.1976661 (DOI)000696869600001 ()2-s2.0-85115145472 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-10-01 Created: 2021-10-01 Last updated: 2021-10-01
Jober, A. & Player-Koro, C. (2021). Hopes and Anticipations within research of AI in Education. In: : . Paper presented at Nordic Educational Research Association (NERA), Odense, 3-5 november 2021..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hopes and Anticipations within research of AI in Education
2021 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The digitalization of the school has been an ongoing process for over 50 years. Often, investments in digital technology have been argued for in relation towards the future, mainly to a future society and working life where new knowledge (linked to the new digital technology) is needed. However, the expectations associated with digital technology have rarely been met and the recurring initiatives have, after evaluations, been followed by a debate on failure, which is not infrequently directed at the school and its staff (Eriksson-Zetterqvist et al., 2006). The concept of disruptive innovation taken from marketing theory has been used by Christo Sims (2017) to describe this phenomenon. There are signs that AI in education (AIED), is the next major digital innovation directed to schools, discursively described as a disruptive innovation with great potential for improving, changing and streamlining education (Sims 2017). This presentation reports from a literature review that aims to explore the discourses that surround AIED and the hopes that are put into education through AIED. The literature review will focus on research from the last decades in the area of AIED, to investigate the hopes and anticipations tied to AI or put it another way what problems AI should solve in relation to schools and education? Methodologically, the literature review will start with a systematic analysis of peer-review articles that will quantify the articles in different categories. The results and the conclusions in the articles will thereafter be analysed with a theoretical framework labelled by Bacchi (2012) as a “What’s the problem represented to be” – analysis. Expected finding could be related to the fact that digitalisation of education has more than many other fields within been influenced by big corporate edu-business (Ideland, Jobér, & Axelsson, 2021; Lundahl, 2016; Player-Koro, Bergviken Rensfeldt & Selwyn, 2018; Rönnberg, 2017; Williamson, 2015) one hypothesis is therefore that financial arguments could be found rather than possibilities for AIED to increase equality, democracy, and diversity (Dixon-Román et al., 2019; Hsratinksy et al., 2019; Selwyn et al., 2020; Williamson, 2018; 2015a,b). Another hypothesis is that citizenship and democracy have become commodities, something to trade within the ed-tech business rather than improving fundamental values as stated in the steering documents. The results from the analyses will be related to the Nordic context and the Nordic steering documents and what they state regarding digitalization in general and AI and algorithms in general. The conclusion focuses on what kind of figurations and narratives that are brought forward in the research in order to identify further research needs but also discuss how this might shape and form the future ed-tech field.

Keywords
AI, Education
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-29235 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Educational Research Association (NERA), Odense, 3-5 november 2021.
Available from: 2023-01-11 Created: 2023-01-11 Last updated: 2023-03-30Bibliographically approved
Bergviken Rensfeldt, A., Moraiti, K., Lundin, M. & Player-Koro, C. (2021). “I log in to several systems then I flip between them”: Teachers’ work in digital platform infrastructures.. In: : . Paper presented at Nordic Educational Research Association Congress 2021 (NERA2021), Odense, Denmark, 3-5 Nov, 2021.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“I log in to several systems then I flip between them”: Teachers’ work in digital platform infrastructures.
2021 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

School teachers’ work in the Nordics and elsewhere has become deeply affected by the ongoing school digitalization, through digital platform investments, digitalization reforms, and the pandemic situation. By focusing on how teachers’ work currently is shaped by emerging digital platform infrastructures, and how teachers’ themselves shape their digital work, this study aims to critically explore the implications of new platform ecologies. By drawing on a Swedish case project funded by Forte, we exemplify of how global commercial platform infrastructures have been integrated into and added to a highly marketized school system. While earlier studies critically approached school platform infrastructures mainly as managerial modes of governance, recent research has revealed its wider democratic implications for the public sector, e.g. the creating of technical lock-ins (Kerssens & van Dijck 2021). Based on a sociotechnical understanding of teachers’ digital work, digital platforms are not seen as simply ‘enablers’, but as agentic and carrying certain values alongside prescribed institutional uses that together regulate teacher work. Methodologically, trace and policy ethnography were used. First, we traced the digital work of four upper secondary school teachers (two men, two women) from two schools (one public municipal school, and one private consortia-owned school) via self-reported work activity time logs, followed up by focus group interviews, as well as a “go-along method”, for observing teachers’ online work. Lastly, we ‘moved out’ to trace the school and wider platform infrastructure from a national and international policy infrastructural perspective. Our preliminary results show how teachers operate within an institutional logic of bureaucratic, market and professional concerns (Friedson 2001) in their digital work, resulting in problems like work intensification and work-life imbalances. One related finding is also that different platform ecologies emerge across different private and public school forms. The dependence of global platform infrastructures in schools is currently increasing. This study hopefully can add a needed Nordic and critical dimension to how this affects teachers’ digital work.

National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-27531 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Educational Research Association Congress 2021 (NERA2021), Odense, Denmark, 3-5 Nov, 2021
Available from: 2022-02-25 Created: 2022-02-25 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Angervall, P., Mahon, K. & Player-Koro, C. (Eds.). (2021). Journal of praxis in higher education (3ed.). Borås: Högskolan i Borås
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Journal of praxis in higher education
2021 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Borås: Högskolan i Borås, 2021. p. 120 Edition: 3
Series
Journal of praxis in higher education, ISSN 2003-3605
National Category
Social Sciences Educational Sciences Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-27021 (URN)10.47989/kpdc.vol3.1.2021 (DOI)
Available from: 2021-12-13 Created: 2021-12-13 Last updated: 2022-01-18Bibliographically approved
Cone, L., Brøgger, K., Berghmans, M., Decuypere, M., Förschler, A., Grimaldi, E., . . . Vanermen, L. (2021). Pandemic Acceleration: Covid-19 and the emergency digitalization of European education. European Educational Research Journal, 21(5), 845-868
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pandemic Acceleration: Covid-19 and the emergency digitalization of European education
Show others...
2021 (English)In: European Educational Research Journal, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 845-868Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With schools and universities closing across Europe, the Covid-19 lockdown left actors in the field of education battling with the unprecedented challenge of finding a meaningful way to keep the wheels of education turning online. The sudden need for digital solutions across the field of education resulted in the emergence of a variety of digital networks and collaborative online platforms. In this joint article from scholars around Europe, we explore the Covid-19 lockdowns of physical education across the European region, and the different processes of emergency digitalization that followed in their wake. Spanning perspectives from Italy, Germany, Belgium, and the Nordic countries, the article’s five cases provide a glimpse of how these processes have at the same time accelerated and consolidated the involvement of various commercial and non-commercial actors in public education infrastructures. By gathering documentation, registering dynamics, and making intimations of the crisis as it unfolded, the aim of the joint paper is to provide an opportunity for considering the implications of these accelerations and consolidations for the heterogeneous futures of European education.

National Category
Educational Sciences Pedagogy Pedagogical Work Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-29250 (URN)10.1177/14749041211041793 (DOI)000692219100001 ()2-s2.0-85114463458 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-11 Created: 2023-01-11 Last updated: 2023-03-28Bibliographically approved
Cone, L., Brøgger, K., Berghmans, M., Decuypere, M., Förschler, A., Grimaldi, E., . . . Vanermen, L. (2021). Pandemic Acceleration: Covid-19 and the emergency digitalization of European education. European Educational Research Journal
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pandemic Acceleration: Covid-19 and the emergency digitalization of European education
Show others...
2021 (English)In: European Educational Research Journal, E-ISSN 1474-9041Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

With schools and universities closing across Europe, the Covid-19 lockdown left actors in the field of education battling with the unprecedented challenge of finding a meaningful way to keep the wheels of education turning online. The sudden need for digital solutions across the field of education resulted in the emergence of a variety of digital networks and collaborative online platforms. In this joint article from scholars around Europe, we explore the Covid-19 lockdowns of physical education across the European region, and the different processes of emergency digitalization that followed in their wake. Spanning perspectives from Italy, Germany, Belgium, and the Nordic countries, the article’s five cases provide a glimpse of how these processes have at the same time accelerated and consolidated the involvement of various commercial and non-commercial actors in public education infrastructures. By gathering documentation, registering dynamics, and making intimations of the crisis as it unfolded, the aim of the joint paper is to provide an opportunity for considering the implications of these accelerations and consolidations for the heterogeneous futures of European education.

Keywords
Boundary spanning, Covid-19, digitalization, platformization, public education, soft privatization
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-26672 (URN)10.1177/14749041211041793 (DOI)000692219100001 ()2-s2.0-85114463458 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-10-11 Created: 2021-10-11 Last updated: 2023-03-28Bibliographically approved
Bergviken Rensfeldt, A., Player-Koro, C., Hillman, T. & Lundin, M. (2021). Pressed for Time?: How Platform Infrastructures and Professional Demands condition Teachers’ Digital Work. In: European Conference on Educational Research: . Paper presented at European Conference on Educational Research (ECER).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pressed for Time?: How Platform Infrastructures and Professional Demands condition Teachers’ Digital Work
2021 (English)In: European Conference on Educational Research, 2021Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

What had often been praised by techno-enthusiasts as “disruption” and “innovation” became more of a harsh reality during 2020 with the fast reorganization to online learning due to the pandemic. With a short timeframe, schools were forced to prepare for distance education and teachers had to adapt, creating online teaching activities while at the same time making sure students were well-cared for educationally, socially, emotionally, and technologically. With the fast reorganization to online learning during the pandemic, the global platform market received more influence and further reached into the core of schools’ everyday work (Williamson & Hogan, 2020). In this sense, fast digitalization has not only made the political economy of school digitalization more apparent, but also highlights how digital work is conditioned by time and the socio-technical coordination of people and technologies (Wajcman, 2015). This paper focus on how teachers regulate and are regulated by digital platform work and in particular, how digital work is regulated by time in different ways. Our interest is both the kind of work done by teachers on digital platforms and how platform infrastructures condition and challenge teachers’ work and work time. The purpose is to explore and problematize the temporal governance of digital work, inscribed in the uses and logics of digital platforms, and forms of governing powers where productivity is considered core value. Analytically, instances where there are pronounced tensions in terms of temporal issues, between the demands of digital infrastructures or professional performance, and school teachers’ everyday work priorities and regulated work hours is of particular interest. The study builds on analyses of already identified tensions in relation to school reforms more generally as existing between the regulating principles of market efficiency governance and the teaching profession’s work conditions (Anderson & Cohen, 2015; Ball, 2003; Lundström & Parding, 2011). The political economy that pushes for school digitization was already strong in Europe and many other parts of the world before the pandemic began. Platform infrastructures, commonly provided by global platform businesses like Google and Microsoft and through Learning Management Systems are not exotic anymore, but are instead everyday technologies in workplaces like schools. Even so, platform technology provided by for example Google increasingly has taken the role of an infrastructure, sociotechnically connecting clouds, software, people, data (Plantin et al., 2018). This “platformization” comes with the business logic of platform capitalism (Srnicek, 2017), profiting on the individuals’ data production with the arguments of making public sector workplaces more efficient and streamlined, and of facilitating teachers’ pedagogical and administrative work. Questions around workload and the intensification of teachers’ work have once again risen up the political agenda (c.f. Fitzgerald et al., 2019). However, research on how school teachers’ work and work situations are changing in relation to digitalization still is relatively scarce (Bergviken Rensfeldt, Hillman, Selwyn, 2018; Selwyn, 2020; Selwyn, Nemorin & Johnson, 2017; Shulte, 2019). We draw on a Swedish project case, in collaboration with and extending an Australian project (e.g. Selwyn, Nemorin & Johnson, 2017). Empirical material was collected in and connected to the digital work of teachers in two upper secondary school forms, two school forms that characterize the Swedish marketized education system, namely, one public school and one independent for-profit school. Methodologically, the ethnographical approach used is policy and infrastructure ethnography, combined with trace ethnography of teachers’ online and offline work. Methodology, Methods, Research Instruments or Sources Used For conducting the policy ethnography, we firstly examined the policies and infrastructures implicated in teachers’ work, combining analyses of policies and platform technologies (Kitchen & Laurialt, 2014). Policy material from the regional municipality or school consortia organizations of the two schools, including extensions to national and European or international levels, e.g. strategies, guidelines, agreements on work time, digital work and platform infrastructure implementation, maintenance and support, was combined with analyses of the digital platforms and applications used in the school organizations of the participating teachers in the study. Further information from stakeholders like IT management or external platform provider companies on decisions, regulations and functionality on these different levels of platform use or data platform infrastructures, e.g. classifications of work activities in data platform standards was also collected via policy documents and interviews. Starting from the schools in the selection of policies and moving out from them, have resulted in a variety of policies that can be considered influencing digital work. In line with this, rather than regarding policies as archival documents, we aimed at selecting policies that were in use, “at work” and perhaps contested in the school workplaces in different ways. The trace ethnography started with four teachers (one man and one woman from each school) self-reporting their own activity logs on digital work based on three selected work days, followed up by a form of online focus group interview which was based on the logs and questions raised from the researchers and focus of the study. The teachers were then also involved in identifying and documenting their own data production and the traces they leave on different digital platforms via a digital self-tracking application capturing time-based screen activity. Conducting digital trace ethnography raise ethical concerns around private integrity which we have tried to counteract by involving the teacher participants themselves in self-tracking of their digital activities of work and by providing tools (self-reported activity logs included) allowing self-reflection of when and where their digital work takes place. The integrative trace ethnography approach (Geiger & Ribes, 2011) used, hence include both ethnographic and computational social science methods. These methods are themselves characterized by temporal categories, timelines, etc. but invites for making visible different temporalities in the ethnographic material. Conclusions, Expected Outcomes or Findings Digital work was analyzed based on tensions between temporalities that could be both static and dynamic but nonetheless were shaping teachers’ work (c.f. Thompson & Cook, 2017). The temporalities were understood as constructs and intertwined with spatialities of school teachers’ digital work. A preliminary finding is that digital work of online learning follows the assigned task and rhythms of schooling, but also extends more widely with the global time of digital platforms and the different temporalities produced in such environments, expanding, fragmentarizing and interrupting work in different ways. In line with Alirezabeigi, Masschelein & Decuypere (2020, p. 203), the digital work activities “not only follow the school time-table and the script of the teacher, but it equally follows the global time”. For example, the analyses included the teacher’s officially-regulated working hours in terms of classroom and workplace time, their self-regulated work time (“förtroendearbetstid”) as well as non-regularized time, all governed by certain ideals of performativity (c.f. Ball, 2003). Similarly, such entities were also translated into platforms datafication classifications of standard school activities (mainly teaching, examining and “other activities”). Hence, digital work temporalities were co-created with the operating tasks prompted by commercial platforms and activities inscribed in the systems, and the overall life cycles of platform infrastructures (updates, procurements, etc). Furthermore, the pandemic situation from March 2020 made certain temporalities around digital work visible, describing a “before-during-after Corona”, with transformed digital work experiences around attending to students and fulfilling new work tasks, implicating work intensification, strategies for work-life balance and coping with presence bleed. In sum, different temporalities and concerns in teachers’ digital work are at work, co-shaped by professional concerns, and the political economy and governance of platform infrastructures, which further add to the aforementioned research which identified tensions of market governance and teachers’ work conditions and professional concerns. References Alhadeff-Jones, M. (2018). Time and the Rhythms of Emancipatory Education Rethinking the temporal complexity of self and society. Routledge. Alirezabeigi, S., Masschelein, J., & Decuypere, M. (2020). Investigating digital doings through breakdowns: a sociomaterial ethnography of a Bring Your Own Device school, Learning, Media and Technology, 45(2), 193-207. Anderson, G., & Cohen, M I. (2015). Redesigning for identities of teachers and leader: A framework for studying new professionalism and educator resistance. Education Policy Archives, 23(85), 1-25. Ball, S. J. (2003) “The Teacher’s Soul and the Terrors of Performativity.” Journal of Education Policy 18(2), 215-228. Bergviken Rensfeldt, A., Hillman, T., & Selwyn, N. (2018). Teachers ‘liking’ their work? Exploring the realities of teacher Facebook groups. British Journal of Education Research, 44(2), 230-250. Decuypere, M. & Vanden Broeck, P. (2020). Time and educational (re-)forms: Inquiring the temporal dimension of education, Educational Philosophy and Theory, 52(6), 602-612. Fitzgerald, S., McGrath-Champ, S., Stacey, M., Wilson, R. & Gavin, M. (2019). Intensification of teachers’ work under devolution: A ‘tsunami’ of paperwork. Journal of Industrial Relations, 61(5), 613-636. Geiger, R.S., & Ribes, D. (2011). Trace ethnography: Following coordination through documentary practices. New York: IEEE. Kitchin, R., & Lauriault T.P. (2014). Towards critical data studies: Charting and unpacking data assemblages and their work. The Programmable City Working Paper 2. Lingard, B. & Greg Thompson (2017). Doing time in the sociology of education, British Journal of Sociology of Education, 38(1), 1-12. Lundström, U., & Parding, K. (2011). Teachers’ experiences with school choice: Clashing logics in the Swedish education system. Education Research International, 1-10. Plantin, J.-C., Lagoze, C., Edwards, P. N., & Sandvig, C. (2018). Infrastructure studies meet platform studies in the age of Google and Facebook. New Media & Society, 20(1), 293-310. Selwyn, N. (2020). The human labour of school data: Exploring the production of digital data in schools. Oxford Review of Education. Selwyn, N., Nemorin, S. & Johnson, N. (2017). High-tech, hard work: An investigation of teachers’ work in the digital age, Learning, Media and Technology, 42(4), 390-405. Srnicek, N. (2017). Platform Capitalism. Polity Press. Shulte, B. (2019). Teacher Agency and the Digital: Empowerment or Control? on_education Journal for Research and Debate, 2(5), 1-7. Thompson, G., & Cook, I. (2017). The politics of teaching time in disciplinary and control societies. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 38(1), 26-37. Wajcman, J. (2018). Pressed by time: The acceleration of life in digital capitalism. The University of Chicago Press. Williamson, B., & Hogan, A. (2020). Commercialisation and privatisation in/of education in the context of Covid-19. Education International Report.

Keywords
digital platform infrastructures, teachers' digital work, temporalities, time regulation
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-26709 (URN)
Conference
European Conference on Educational Research (ECER)
Available from: 2021-10-11 Created: 2021-10-11 Last updated: 2021-12-01Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4178-4609

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