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Nyström, Maria
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Publications (10 of 112) Show all publications
Palmér, L., Nyström, M. & Karlsson, K. (2023). Lifeworld hermeneutics: An approach and a method for research on existential issues in caring science. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lifeworld hermeneutics: An approach and a method for research on existential issues in caring science
2023 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background and aim

The aim of the present article was to elaborate on a research approach and method called ‘lifeworld hermeneutics’. Significant to lifeworld hermeneutics is that interpretation is the main methodological instrument for explaining and understanding existential research questions and lived experiences. From a caring science perspective, this often refers to research that aims to gain a deeper understanding of existential phenomena and issues, such as existential meaning of health, well-being, homelessness, lostness, suffering and ageing, as well as what it means to experience unhealthiness and illness, the need for care, and caring that responds to such needs.

Design

Theoretical paper.

Result

The article briefly covers ontology and epistemology that clarifies the meaning and importance of a lifeworld hermeneutic attitude. This is followed by suggestions for how to perform a lifeworld hermeneutic study, expressed in relation to methodological principles for the interpretation, validation and structuring of interpretations. Thereafter, follow reflections on how to use theoretical or philosophical support to develop and deepen existential interpretations. The findings of lifeworld hermeneutic research consist of existential interpretations where the researcher, with an open and pliable attitude towards the phenomenon and the aim of the study, clarifies, explains and suggests new ways of understanding participants’ lived experiences; the researcher should maintain such an attitude towards their understanding of the phenomenon as well.

Conclusion

The lifeworld hermeneutical approach and method described in this article makes it possible to further deepen the understanding and knowledge about existential issues that is relevant for caring and caring science. 

Keywords
caring science, existential issues, interpretation, lifeworld hermeneutics, lived experiences, meaning
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-30523 (URN)10.1111/scs.13201 (DOI)001059649400001 ()2-s2.0-85169450281 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-18 Created: 2023-09-18 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Palmér, L., Nyström, M., Carlsson, G., Ekebergh, M., Fridh, I., Lindberg, E. & Wireklint Sundström, B. (2022). Caring Science With a Focus on Existential Issues in a Caring Context: A Research Area Inspired by Existential Philosophy. International journal for human caring, 26(3), 1-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caring Science With a Focus on Existential Issues in a Caring Context: A Research Area Inspired by Existential Philosophy
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2022 (English)In: International journal for human caring, ISSN 1091-5710, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines and exemplifies how existential philosophy can provide a deeper understanding of existential issues in a caring context. Existential philosophy, including lifeworld theory, is treated both as an epistemology for the development of research methods and inspiration for analysis and discussions in caring science research. The significance of the lifeworld is also highlighted as a guide to perform and enable caring and caring didactics, along with short descriptions where existential philosophy has previously influenced the development of caring science. The concept of existential caring science is suggested as a research area for research on existential and meaning-oriented phenomena.

Keywords
caring science, caring, existential, phenomenology, hermeneutics, lifeworld
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-28468 (URN)10.20467/HumanCaring-D-21-00014 (DOI)2-s2.0-85138554015 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-09-01 Created: 2022-09-01 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Palmér, L., Nyström, M., Ekebergh, M., Lindberg, E. & Karlsson, K. (2022). Pre-Understanding: A Threat to Validity in Qualitative Caring Science Research?. International journal for human caring, 26(4), 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pre-Understanding: A Threat to Validity in Qualitative Caring Science Research?
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2022 (English)In: International journal for human caring, ISSN 1091-5710, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article is devoted to reflections on how to prevent pre-understanding from influencing the research process and jeopardizing the validity of a study. Influences from preunderstanding exemplified from empirical lifeworld-led caring science research. Finally, there is a discussion of preunderstanding as a natural attitude and therefore also an important part of the lifeworld. It is concluded that validity requires a self-critical approach. It is suggested that a descriptive analysis, where the findings are fairly close to the data, involves a less problematic approach than research, which requires special attention to pre-understanding in connection with different levels of interpretation.

Keywords
caring science, description, epistemology, interpretation, lifeworld research, pre-understanding
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care; The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-28467 (URN)10.20467/IJHC-2021-0013 (DOI)2-s2.0-85163312026 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-09-01 Created: 2022-09-01 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Jarling, A., Rydström, I., Fransson, E. I., Nyström, M., Dalheim Englund, A.-C. & Bravell, M. E. (2022). Relationships first: Formal and informal home care of older adults in Sweden. Health & Social Care in the Community
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationships first: Formal and informal home care of older adults in Sweden
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2022 (English)In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

To a great extent, older people in Sweden, often with extensive care needs, are cared for in their own home. Support is often needed from both family and professional caregivers. This study aimed to describe and analyse different aspects of health, functioning and social networks, and how they relate to formal and informal care in the home among older adults. Analyses were performed utilising data from the OCTO-2 study, with a sample of 317 people living in Jonkoping County, aged 75, 80, 85 or 90 years, living in their own homes. Data were collected with in-person-testing. Based on receipt of care, the participants were divided into three groups: no care, informal care only, and formal care with or without informal care. Descriptive statistics and multinomial regression analysis were performed to explore the associations between received care and different aspects of health (such as multimorbidity, polypharmacy), social networks (such as loneliness, number of confidants) and functioning (such as managing daily life). The findings demonstrate that the majority of the participants received no care at home (61%). Multimorbidity and polypharmacy were more common among those receiving some kind of care in comparison to those who received no care; moreover, those receiving some kind of care also had difficulties managing daily life and less satisfaction with their social networks. The multinomial logistic regression analyses demonstrated that age, functioning in daily life, perceived general health and satisfaction with the number of confidants were related to receipt of care, but the associations among these factors differed depending on the type of care that was received. The results show the importance of a holistic perspective that includes the older person's experiences when planning home care. The results also highlight the importance of considering social perspectives and relationships in home care rather than focusing only on health factors.

Keywords
community, family caregiving, health and social care, health care, home care, informal care, older people, PEOPLE, HEALTH, LIFE
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-27717 (URN)10.1111/hsc.13765 (DOI)000772823500001 ()2-s2.0-85127257006 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Futurum - Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council, Sweden, 13282
Available from: 2022-04-04 Created: 2022-04-04 Last updated: 2022-04-12Bibliographically approved
Gillsjo, C., Nyström, M., Palmér, L., Carlsson, G., Dalheim Englund, A.-C. & Eriksson, I. (2021). Balance in life as a prerequisite for community-dwelling older adults' sense of health and well-being after retirement: an interview-based study. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 16(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Balance in life as a prerequisite for community-dwelling older adults' sense of health and well-being after retirement: an interview-based study
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2021 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 16, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE This study aimed to describe community-dwelling older adults’ perceptions of health and well-being in life after retirement.

METHODS This study is part of a larger project using a mixed-methods design to address lifestyles’ influence on community-dwelling older adults’ health. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 older adults in age 70 to 95 years. Data were analysed according to a phenomenographic approach.

RESULTS The results encompass four categories describing variations in community-dwelling older adults’ perceptions of health and well-being after retirement: feeling well despite illness and disease, interacting with and being useful for oneself and others, independently embracing opportunities and engaging in life, and maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

CONCLUSIONS The absence of illness and disease is not a clear prerequisite for a sense of health and well-being. To promote and preserve health and well-being after retirement, older adults strived for—and coached themselves to uphold—a balance in life, focusing on not burdening others. This life orientation after retirement must be acknowledged by society at large, especially from an ageist perspective, and in health and social care to preserve and promote health and well-being.

Keywords
Health, lifestyle, older adults, community, life balance, retirement, well-being, qualitative, phenomenography, QUALITY-OF-LIFE, AGED 85 YEARS, PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY, SOCIAL-ISOLATION, LONELINESS, PREDICTOR, CONCEPTIONS, COHERENCE, MORTALITY
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-26824 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2021.1984376 (DOI)000706099300001 ()2-s2.0-85116918944 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-10-28 Created: 2021-10-28 Last updated: 2024-02-01
Jarling, A., Rydström, I., Ernsth Bravell, M., Nyström, M. & Dalheim Englund, A.-C. (2020). Perceptions of Professional Responsibility When Caring for Older People in Home Care in Sweden. Journal of Community Health Nursing, 37(3), 141-152
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of Professional Responsibility When Caring for Older People in Home Care in Sweden
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Community Health Nursing, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 141-152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Older people in Sweden are increasingly being cared for in the own home, where professional caregivers play an important role. This study aimed to describe perceptions of caring responsibility in the context of older people’s homes from the perspective of professional caregivers from caring professions. Fourteen interviews were conducted with professional caregivers from different professions. The result show how professional caregivers perceive responsibility as limitless, constrained by time, moral, overseeing, meaningful and lonesome. Responsibility seems to affect caregivers to a large extent when the burden is high. Professional caregivers’ perceptions of responsibility, and the potential consequences of a perceived strained work situation therefore need to be addressed. The findings also indicate a need for professional support and guidance when it is difficult to distinguish between professional and personal responsibility.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-23963 (URN)10.1080/07370016.2020.1780044 (DOI)000561996900003 ()2-s2.0-85089745456 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-10-22 Created: 2020-10-22 Last updated: 2021-10-21Bibliographically approved
Palmér, L., Nyström, M., Carlsson, G., Gillsjö, C., Eriksson, I. & Dalheim Englund, A.-C. (2020). The intertwining of reconciliation and displacement: a lifeworld hermeneutic study of older adults’ perceptions of the finality of life. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 15(1), 1-11, Article ID 799588.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The intertwining of reconciliation and displacement: a lifeworld hermeneutic study of older adults’ perceptions of the finality of life
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2020 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 1-11, article id 799588Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This study aimed to explain and understand the existential meaning of the finality of life from the perspective of healthy older adults. Method: Participants were recruited from a major project on older adults’ life situations. They were interviewed about their thoughts on the end of life, and their responses were interpreted using a lifeworld hermeneutic approach. Results: The findings showed that thinking about the inevitable finality of life involves feelings of liberation, frightening thoughts, a comforting promise of something beyond death, acceptance of the concept of death as a companion in life and, a desire to live. Philosopher Simone de Beauvoir’s existential ideas about ageing and death were then used to further explain and understand the meaning of the finality of life and to support a comprehensive understanding. de Beauvoir suggests that when the temporal horizon of existence shrinks, one lives closer to the finality of life. For a comprehensive understanding, attributing meaning to the finality of life required the intertwining of reconciliation and displacement. The interpretations were further discussed using ideas from the fields of existential philosophy and caring science in order to develop a basis for caring practice. Conclusions: The conclusions suggested that professional health care for older adults would benefit from a lifeworld-led caring science approach that includes readiness for a caring dialogue that focuses on existential issues.

Keywords
Existential matters; existential caring science; caring dialogue; lifeworld hermeneutics; finality of life; older adult
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-23691 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2020.1799588 (DOI)000556400700001 ()2-s2.0-85089151258 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-08-13 Created: 2020-08-13 Last updated: 2022-11-01Bibliographically approved
Jarling, A., Rydström, I., Ernsth-Bravell, M., Nyström, M. & Dalheim Englund, A.-C. (2019). A responsibility that never rests - To be a family caregiver to an older person. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A responsibility that never rests - To be a family caregiver to an older person
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2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

When the ageing population increases, the burden and responsibility of close family members will likely increase. Those closely related who assume a great responsibility can be significantly affected in health, well‐being and daily life.

Aim

This study aims to describe the life situation when family caregivers are imposed responsibility for an older person with complex care needs in their own home.

Methods

In this Swedish qualitative study, ten family caregivers were strategically selected in order to achieve variations in the life situation. A reflective lifeworld research design based on phenomenological philosophy was used throughout the data collection with the lifeworld interviews and the analytic process.

Findings

In terms of extensive responsibility, the life situation is complex and involves emotions that are difficult to manage. In essence, a paradoxical life situation is described which is experienced as both voluntarily and nonchosen at the same time. The responsibility never rests. The essential meaning is further illustrated with three constituents: loss of freedom, contradictory feelings and affected relationships.

Conclusion

A life situation with extensive responsibility for an older family member interferes with the whole life situation with an impact on health and relationships with other people. The findings are crucial for professional caregivers in order to capture the nature of family support in a way that enables a meaningful life for both the family caregiver and the older person being cared for. Knowledge of this will give professional caregivers an increased awareness of the life situation of family caregivers and provide a better understanding of the support they are longing for, and, in some countries, such as Sweden, also are entitled to by law.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21011 (URN)10.1111/scs.12703 (DOI)000516881800005 ()2-s2.0-85065418558 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-10 Created: 2019-05-10 Last updated: 2021-10-20Bibliographically approved
Dalheim Englund, A.-C., Carlsson, G., Nyström, M., Gillsjö, C., Eriksson, I. & Palmér, L. (2019). Life without professional work-perceptionsabout one’s self, interpersonal relations andsocial life after retirement. Healthy Aging Research, 8(1), 1-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life without professional work-perceptionsabout one’s self, interpersonal relations andsocial life after retirement
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2019 (English)In: Healthy Aging Research, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to understand how healthy, older adults in Sweden perceive their life situation after retirement. The study is based on a lifeworld approach, and a phenomenographic method was used. Eighteen participants were interviewed, and data were analysed according to the phenomenographic principle of qualitatively different categories. Two categories were developed. The first category, “perceptions that draw attention inward, towards one’s self”, was further described in three subcategories: Sense of decreased status in society, the desire to keep aging at a distance, and contemplation of one’s own existence. The second category, “perceptions that draw attention outward, away from one’s self” was further described in the following four subcategories: caretaking of family members, involvement in social relationships, finding of deep meaning in animals and nature and engagement with society. In the discussion, the findings are further illuminated through comparisons with concepts such as maturity, wisdom and gerotranscendence, and reflections on the findings ‘relevance to a caring context follow. The conclusion suggests this study can provide knowledge that will allow healthcare providers to bridge the gap between generations in order to provide high-quality care. However, for a more profound caring dialogue, for example, about the end of life, a deeper analysis is required.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15888 (URN)10.12715/har.2019.8.2 (DOI)000467323300001 ()
Available from: 2019-03-21 Created: 2019-03-21 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Palmér, L., Nyström, M., Carlsson, G., Gillsjö, C., Eriksson, I. & Dalheim Englund, A.-C. (2019). The meaning of growing old: A lifeworld hermeneutic study on existential matters during the third age of life. Healthy Aging Research, 8(8), 1-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The meaning of growing old: A lifeworld hermeneutic study on existential matters during the third age of life
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2019 (English)In: Healthy Aging Research, ISSN 2261-7434, Vol. 8, no 8, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates existential matters in the third age of life, which encompasses the years after retirement and ends when extensive support needs emerge in the fourth age. As the theoretical starting point in a lifeworld hermeneutic approach, 18 healthy older adults were interviewed about what it means for them to grow old. The interviews were interpreted according to Gadamer’s principles of openness and Ricoeur’s proposal to provide suggestions on how meaning can be explained. The findings are presented in three interpreted themes: Feeling free, Becoming vulnerable, and Existing in closeness to death. The themes are further interpreted, and a comprehensive understanding is reached with theoretical support from Jean-Paul Sartre’s idea of factuality and project. The meaning of growing old is discussed in terms of positive factors, such as healthy aging, transition and gerotranscendence, but also in respect to concerns over future suffering in relation to illness and dependence. It is concluded that the freedom of the third age is greatly appreciated for a healthy life, but also threatened by increased risks of ill health. It is not morbidity in itself that worries most, but the risk of being dependent on care and support from others. This is important to consider when planning and performing care in order to promote a healthy aging.

Keywords
Caring science, Dependence on care, Existential matters, Healthy aging, Lifeworld hermeneutics
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21588 (URN)10.35248/har.2019.8.8 (DOI)000489302100001 ()
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
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