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Lundberg, Lars
Publications (10 of 72) Show all publications
Abelsson, A. & Lundberg, L. (2018). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality during CPR practice versus during a simulated life-saving event.. International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, 24(4), 652-655
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality during CPR practice versus during a simulated life-saving event.
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, ISSN 1080-3548, E-ISSN 2376-9130, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 652-655Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: As a part of the emergency medical services, the Swedish fire brigade can increase the survival rate in out-of-hospital cardiac arrests.

AIM: To compare the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performed by firefighters at a routine CPR practice versus when involved in a simulated life-saving event.

METHODS: In this study, 80 firefighters divided into two groups performed CPR according to guidelines: one group indoors during a routine training session; the other group outdoors during a smoke diving exercise wearing personal protective clothing and self-contained breathing apparatus. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data.

RESULTS: The results showed a tendency for the outdoor group to perform CPR with better ventilation and compression quality, as compared to the indoor group. The ventilation of the manikin was not hampered by the firefighters wearing personal protective clothes and self-contained breathing apparatus, as the Swedish firefighters remove their facial mask and ventilate the patient with their mouth using a pocket mask.

CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the results in both groups showed a high quality of CPR which can be related to the fire brigade training and education traditions. CPR training is regularly performed, which in turn helps to maintain CPR skills.

Keywords
cardiopulmonary resuscitation, firefighter, practice, simulation, smoke diving
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15509 (URN)10.1080/10803548.2018.1502962 (DOI)000450275500017 ()30059279 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055831128 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Abelsson, A. & Lundberg, L. (2018). Simulation as a means to develop firefighters as emergency care professionals.. International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, 1-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulation as a means to develop firefighters as emergency care professionals.
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, ISSN 1080-3548, E-ISSN 2376-9130, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the simulated emergency care performed by firefighters and their perception of simulation as an educational method.

METHODS: This study had a mixed method with both a quantitative and a qualitative approach. Data were collected by simulation assessment, a questionnaire, and written comments. Descriptive analysis was conducted on the quantitative data whereas a qualitative content analysis was conducted on the qualitative data. Finally, a contingent analysis was used where a synthesis configured both the quantitative and the qualitative results into a narrative result.

RESULTS: The cognitive workload that firefighters face during simulated emergency care is crucial for learning. In this study, the severity and complexity of the scenarios provided were higher than expected by the firefighters. Clearly stated conditions for the simulation and constructive feedback were considered positive for learning. Patient actors induced realism in the scenario, increasing the experience of stress, in comparison to a manikin.

CONCLUSION: To simulate in a realistic on-scene environment increases firefighters' cognitive ability to critically analyze problems and manage emergency care. Simulation of emergency care developed the firefighters as professionals.

Keywords
cognitive load, contingent analysis synthesis, emergency care, firefighter, simulation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15510 (URN)10.1080/10803548.2018.1541122 (DOI)30362390 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Hindorf, M., Lundberg, L. & Jonsson, A. (2018). Swedish Specialized Boarding Element Members' Experiences of Naval Hostile Duty. Journal of Special Operations Medicine, 01(18(3)), 45-49
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish Specialized Boarding Element Members' Experiences of Naval Hostile Duty
2018 (English)In: Journal of Special Operations Medicine, ISSN 1553-9768, Vol. 01, no 18(3), p. 45-49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The Swedish naval specialized boarding element participated in Operation Atalanta in 2013 to mitigate piracy by escorting and protecting ships included in the United Nations World Food Program in the Indian Ocean. We describe the experiences of the Swedish naval specialized boarding-element members during 4 months of international naval hostile duty. Some studies have reported experiences of naval duty for the Coast Guard or the merchant fleet; however, we did not find any studies that identified or described experiences of long-time duty onboard ship for the naval armed forces.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: The respondents wrote individual notes of daily events while onboard. Conventional content analysis was used on the collected data, using an inductive approach.

RESULTS: The findings revealed three broad themes: military preparedness, coping with the naval context, and handling physical and mental strain. Different categories emerged indicating that the participants need the ability to adapt to the naval environment and to real situations.

CONCLUSION: The Swedish navalforces should train their specialized element members in coping strategies. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
St Petersburg, Florida: , 2018
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15694 (URN)30222836 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056653254 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-18 Created: 2019-01-18 Last updated: 2019-01-18Bibliographically approved
Abelsson, A. & Lundberg, L. (2018). Trauma Simulation in Prehospital Emergency Care.. Journal of trauma nursing : the official journal of the Society of Trauma Nurses, 25(3), 201-204
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trauma Simulation in Prehospital Emergency Care.
2018 (English)In: Journal of trauma nursing : the official journal of the Society of Trauma Nurses, ISSN 1078-7496, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 201-204Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Well-educated ambulance staff is a prerequisite for high-quality prehospital trauma care. The aim of this study was to examine how nurses in the ambulance service experienced participation in trauma simulation. Sixty-one nurses, working in an emergency ambulance service, performed simulated trauma care on four different occasions and afterward rated three statements on a 5-point Likert scale. A descriptive and inferential analysis was conducted. There are statistically significant increases between the pre- and posttests regarding all three statements: "I think simulation of severe trauma with manikins is realistic" (0.23 or 6% increase), "Simulation is a suitable method for learning severe trauma care" (1.3 or 38% increase), and "I am comfortable in the situation learning severe trauma care through simulation" (0.74 or 19% increase). With the experience of realism in simulation, participants become more motivated to learn and prepare for future events. If the participants instead feel uncomfortable during simulation training, they focus on their own feelings instead of learning. In a realistic simulated environment, participants are prepared to understand and manage the emergency care situation in clinical work. Participants learn during simulation when they are outside their comfort zone but without being uncomfortable or experiencing anxiety.

Keywords
Ambulance, Prehospital emergency Care, Simulation, Trauma
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15511 (URN)10.1097/JTN.0000000000000370 (DOI)000434023100010 ()29742635 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2019-01-11Bibliographically approved
Heldal, I., Backlund, P., Johannesson, M., Lebram, M. & Lundberg, L. (2017). Connecting the links: Narratives, simulations and serious games in prehospital training.. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 235, 343-347
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Connecting the links: Narratives, simulations and serious games in prehospital training.
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2017 (English)In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, E-ISSN 1879-8365, Vol. 235, p. 343-347Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Due to rapid and substantial changes in the health sector, collaboration and supporting technologies get more into focus. Changes in education and training are also required. Simulations and serious games (SSG) are often advocated as promising technologies supporting training of many and in the same manner, or increasing the skills necessary to deal with new, dangerous, complex or unexpected situations. The aim of this paper is to illustrate and discuss resources needed for planning and performing collaborative contextual training scenarios. Based on a practical study involving prehospital nurses and different simulator technologies the often-recurring activity chains in prehospital training were trained. This paper exemplifies the benefit of using narratives and SSGs for contextual training contributing to higher user experiences. The benefits of using simulation technologies aligned by processes can be easier defined by narratives from practitioners. While processes help to define more efficient and effective training, narratives and SSGs are beneficial to design scenarios with clues for higher user experiences. By discussing illustrative examples, the paper contributes to better understanding of how to plan simulation-technology rich training scenarios.

Keywords
Prehospital training, design, narratives, serious games, simulation, user-experiences collaboration
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12888 (URN)10.3233/978-1-61499-753-5-343 (DOI)28423811 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85018824807 (Scopus ID)
Projects
SAREK
Available from: 2017-10-21 Created: 2017-10-21 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Andersson, S.-O., Lundberg, L., Jonsson, A., Tingström, P. & Abrandt Dahlgren, M. (2017). Doctors' and nurses' perceptions of military pre-hospital emergency care - When training becomes reality.. International Emergency Nursing, 32, 70-77, Article ID S1755-599X(17)30010-1.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Doctors' and nurses' perceptions of military pre-hospital emergency care - When training becomes reality.
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2017 (English)In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 32, p. 70-77, article id S1755-599X(17)30010-1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to identify physicians' and nurses' perceptions of military pre-hospital emergency care before and after an international mission. A qualitative empirical study with a phenomenographic approach was used. The results after pre-deployment training can be categorised as (1) learning about military medicine and (2) taking care of the casualty. The results after an international mission can be categorised as (1) collaborating with others, (2) providing general health care and (3) improving competence in military medicine. These results indicate that the training should be developed in order to optimise pre-deployment training for physicians and nurses. This may result in increased safety for the provider of care, while at the same time minimising suffering and enhancing the possibility of survival of the injured.

Keywords
International mission, Learning, Military pre-hospital emergency care, Qualitative method, Training
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12889 (URN)10.1016/j.ienj.2017.01.001 (DOI)000402650700013 ()28228341 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85013115681 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-21 Created: 2017-10-21 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Backlund, P., Engström, H., Johannesson, M., Lebram, M., Danielsson, M., Andersson Hagiwara, M., . . . Maurin Söderholm, H. (2017). The S.A.R.E.K Simulation Environment: Technical description of a flexible training environment for prehospital care.. Skövde
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The S.A.R.E.K Simulation Environment: Technical description of a flexible training environment for prehospital care.
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2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This report contains a technical description of the result of the S.A.R.E.K (Simulation – Ambulance – Research – Education - Kinship) collaboration project and the Sim2020 project. The projects are collaborations between researchers in healthcare and IT, and prehospital care practitioners, with the aim to design, develop and test a contextualized simulation environment for prehospital care. We built a simulation environment representing the full depth and width of a prehospital care process. Breadth refers to including all phases of a prehospital mission, from dispatch to handover; while depth refers to detailed representations and recreation of artefacts, information and context for each of these phases. This report outlines the details of the overall design, all equipment and practical solutions used to create this. Apart from the installation which is described in this report we have also developed methods and carried out a variety of tests and experiments which are reported elsewhere. The focus of this report is the system and its components.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Skövde: , 2017
Keywords
prehospital simulation
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14993 (URN)
Projects
SAREK
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2018-08-17Bibliographically approved
Silverplats, K., Jonsson, A. & Lundberg, L. (2016). A hybrid simulator model for the control of catastrophic external junctional haemorrhage in the military environment. Advances in Simulation, 1(5), Article ID 2016 1:5 DOI: 10.1186/s41077-016-0008-z.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A hybrid simulator model for the control of catastrophic external junctional haemorrhage in the military environment
2016 (English)In: Advances in Simulation, ISSN 2059-0628, Vol. 1, no 5, article id 2016 1:5 DOI: 10.1186/s41077-016-0008-zArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Catastrophic haemorrhage from extremity injuries has for a long time been the single most common cause of preventable death in the military environment. The effective use of extremity tourniquets has increased the survival of combat casualties, and exsanguination from isolated limb injuries is no longer the most common cause of death. Today, the most common cause of potentially preventable death is haemorrhage from the junctional zones, i.e. the most proximal part of the extremities, not amenable to standard tourniquets.

Different training techniques to control catastrophic haemorrhage have been used by the Swedish Armed Forces in the pre-deployment training of physicians, nurses and medics for many years. The training techniques include different types of human patient simulators such as moulage patients and manikins. Preferred training conditions for the control of catastrophic haemorrhage include a high degree of realism, in combination with multiple training attempts.

This report presents a new hybrid training model for catastrophic external junctional haemorrhage control. It offers a readily reproducible, simple and inexpensive opportunity to train personnel to deal with life threatening catastrophic junctional haemorrhage. In particular, this model offers an opportunity for non-medical military personnel in Sweden to practice control of realistic catastrophic haemorrhage, with multiple training attempts.

Keywords
Extremity injuries, Haemorrhage control, Haemostatic agents, Junctional haemorrhage, Military Prehospital training
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-8918 (URN)10.1186/s41077-016-0008-z (DOI)29449974 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-02-19 Created: 2016-02-19 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
Suserud, B.-O. & Lundberg, L. (2016). Prehospital akutsjukvård (2ed.). Stockholm: Liber
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prehospital akutsjukvård
2016 (Swedish)Book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Liber, 2016. p. 560 Edition: 2
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-11678 (URN)978-91-47-11474-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-01-09 Created: 2017-01-09 Last updated: 2017-01-09Bibliographically approved
Engström, H., Andersson Hagiwara, M., Backlund, P., Lebram, M., Lundberg, L., Johannesson, M., . . . Maurin Söderholm, H. (2016). The impact of contextualization on immersion in healthcare simulation. Advances in Simulation, 1(1), 1-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of contextualization on immersion in healthcare simulation
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2016 (English)In: Advances in Simulation, ISSN 2059-0628, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to explore how contextualization of a healthcare simulation scenarios impacts immersion, by using a novel objective instrument, the Immersion Score Rating Instrument. This instrument consists of 10 triggers that indicate reduced or enhanced immersion among participants in a simulation scenario. Triggers refer to events such as jumps in time or space (sign of reduced immersion) and natural interaction with the manikin (sign of enhanced immersion) and can be used to calculate an immersion score.

National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-9517 (URN)10.1186/s41077-016-0009-y (DOI)
Available from: 2016-04-05 Created: 2016-04-05 Last updated: 2017-05-04Bibliographically approved
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