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Lindahl, Berit
Publications (10 of 84) Show all publications
Lindahl, B. (2019). Can an ICU-patient room promote wellbeing and improve healthcare quality?. In: : . Paper presented at European Federation of Critical Care Nursing (EfCCNa), Ljubljana, February 13-16, 2019..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can an ICU-patient room promote wellbeing and improve healthcare quality?
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Aim: To present novel reflections on environment regarding the design of the patient room in intensive care units (ICUs).

Introduction: An ICU and the patient room in particular, is a protected and closed area in that other hospital staff and visitors have no immediate access to such environment. The ICU environment often appears frightening to patients and their loved ones due to presence of technology and advanced treatments. There is evidence that sounds, light, sleep deprivation and ICU delirium impact on patients’ health and recovery. Research has described negative effects of ICU environment to staff concerning noise, high work-load, heavy responsibilities and a complex psychological proximity to patients and their loved ones. A health care environment and patient room should be safe and attractive to staff so that they continue to contribute to caring processes. However, research about ICU’s physical environment and ICU-patient room design are sparse and thus evidence about how to design such areas is weak.

Recommendations: Recommendations based on evaluation of a research program concerning evidence-based design in ICU-patient rooms will be shared. Components like light, sound environment, shape, colours, decoration and view to nature will be presented, pros and con with single rooms and the concepts privacy and control will be articulated. The research program was performed within a caring science perspective and so far it has generated three PhD theses with a forth on its way. Directions for further research such as interdisciplinary collaboration, the need for development of the meta-paradigm concept environment will be suggested. The latter needs to be theorized, problematized and practically explored. ICU-nurses, nursing researchers and former patients should collaborate with architects, building planners and economists in planning of new ICUs. Concepts like enriching and healing environments should be a part of ICU-nurses education curricula.

Keywords
Evidendence-based design, Intensive care
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21049 (URN)
Conference
European Federation of Critical Care Nursing (EfCCNa), Ljubljana, February 13-16, 2019.
Projects
Evidensbaserad Vård inom intensivvård - en framtida utmaning
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521-2013-969
Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved
Lindahl, B., Fridh, I. & Andersson, M. (2019). Can an ICU-patient roompromote wellbeing and improve healthcare quality?. In: : . Paper presented at EfCCNA conference in Ljublijana Slovenien, 13-16 February, 2019.. EfCCNA
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can an ICU-patient roompromote wellbeing and improve healthcare quality?
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

To present novel reflections on environment regarding the design of the patient room in intensive care units(ICUs).Introduction: An ICU and the patient room in particular, is a protected and closed area in that other hospital staff and visitors have no immediate access to such environment. The ICU environment often appears frightening to patients and their loved ones due to presence of technology and advanced treatments. There is evidence that sounds, light, sleep deprivation and ICU delirium impact on patients’ health and recovery. Research has described negative effects of ICU environment to staff concerning noise, high work-load, heavy responsibilities and a complex psychological proximity to patients and their loved ones. A health care environment and patient room should be safe and attractive to staff so that they continue to contribute to caring processes. However, research about ICU’s physical environment and ICU-patient room design are sparse and thus evidence about how to design such areas is weak. Recommendations: Recommendations based on evaluation of a research program concerning evidence-based design in ICU-patient rooms will be shared. Components like light, sound environment, shape, colours, decoration and view to nature will be presented, pros and con with single rooms and the concepts privacy and control will be articulated. The research program was performed within a caring science perspective and so far it has generated three PhD theses with a forth on its way. Directions for further research such as interdisciplinary collaboration, the need for development of the meta-paradigm concept environment will be suggested. The latter needs to be theorized, problematized and practically explored. ICU-nurses, nursing researchers and former patients should collaborate with architects, building planners and economists in planning of new ICUs. Concepts like enriching and healing environments should be a part of ICU-nurses education curricula.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
EfCCNA: , 2019
Keywords
Intensive care unit, caring environment, evidence-based design, sustainable environment
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15885 (URN)
Conference
EfCCNA conference in Ljublijana Slovenien, 13-16 February, 2019.
Projects
Evidensbaserad design inom intensivvård - en framtida utmaning
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521-2013-969
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-04-11Bibliographically approved
Björk, K., Lindahl, B. & Fridh, I. (2019). Family members’ experiences of waiting in intensive care: a concept analysis. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 1-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family members’ experiences of waiting in intensive care: a concept analysis
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM:

The aim of this study was to explore the meaning of family members' experience of waiting in an intensive care context using Rodgers' evolutionary method of concept analysis.

METHOD:

Systematic searches in CINAHL and PubMed retrieved 38 articles which illustrated the waiting experienced by family members in an intensive care context. Rodgers' evolutionary method of concept analysis was applied to the data.

FINDINGS:

In total, five elements of the concept were identified in the analysis. These were as follows: living in limbo; feeling helpless and powerless; hoping; enduring; and fearing the worst. Family members' vigilance regarding their relative proved to be a related concept, but vigilance does not share the same set of attributes. The consequences of waiting were often negative for the relatives and caused them suffering. The references show that the concept was manifested in different situations and in intensive care units (ICUs) with various types of specialties.

CONCLUSIONS:

The application of concept analysis has brought a deeper understanding and meaning to the experience of waiting among family members in an intensive care context. This may provide professionals with an awareness of how to take care of family members in this situation. The waiting is inevitable, but improved communication between the ICU staff and family members is necessary to reduce stress and alleviate the suffering of family members. It is important to acknowledge that waiting cannot be eliminated but family-centred care, including a friendly and welcoming hospital environment, can ease the burden of family members with a loved one in an ICU.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: , 2019
Keywords
family members, waiting, intensive care, crit- ical care, Rodgers’ evolutionary method of concept analysis
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21048 (URN)10.1111/scs.12660 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved
Andersson, M., Fridh, I. & Lindahl, B. (2019). Is it possible to feel at home in a patient room in an intensive care unit? Reflections on environmental aspects in technology dense environments: Is it possible to feel at home in a patient room in an intensive care unit?. Nursing Inquiry
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is it possible to feel at home in a patient room in an intensive care unit? Reflections on environmental aspects in technology dense environments: Is it possible to feel at home in a patient room in an intensive care unit?
2019 (English)In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Abstract [en]

This paper focuses on the patient’s perspective and the philosophical underpinnings that support what might be considered optimal for the future design of the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patient room. It also addresses the question of whether the aspects that support at-homeness are applicable to ICU patient rooms. The concept of ‘at-homeness’ in ICUs is strongly related to privacy and control of space and territory. This study investigates whether the sense of at-homeness can be created in an ICU, when one or more patients share a room. From an interdisciplinary perspective, we critically reflect on various aspects associated with conflicts surrounding the use of ICU patient rooms. Thus, from an architectural and a caring perspective, the significance of space and personal territory in ICU patient rooms is emphasized. Recommendations for further research are suggested. In conclusion, privacy and control are deemed to be essential factors in the stimulation of recovery processes and the promotion of wellbeing in situations involving severe illness or life-threatening conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
Keywords
ICU, patient room, at-homeness, space and place, control, work environment
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21052 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521-2013-969
Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2019-05-28
Sundberg, F., Fridh, I., Olausson, S. & Lindahl, B. (2019). Room Design - A Phenomenological-Hermeneutical Study: A Factor in Creating a Caring Environment.. Critical Care Nursing Quarterly, 42(3), 265-277, Article ID 31135477.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Room Design - A Phenomenological-Hermeneutical Study: A Factor in Creating a Caring Environment.
2019 (English)In: Critical Care Nursing Quarterly, ISSN 0887-9303, E-ISSN 1550-5111, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 265-277, article id 31135477Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Medical technology has progressed tremendously over the last few decades, but the same development cannot be seen in the design of these intensive care unit environments. Authors report results of a study of evidence-based room design, emphasizing the impact on conveying a caring attitude to patients. Ten nonparticipant observations were conducted in patient rooms with 2 different designs, followed by interviews. The data were analyzed using a phenomenological-hermeneutical approach. The results did not reveal that it was obvious that redesigned spaces resulted in a more caring attitude. The meanings of caring displayed during nursing activities were interpreted by interpreting gazes. Some of the nursing staff had an instrumental gaze, interpreted as caring with a task-orientated approach, while others communicated their caring with an attentive and attuned gaze, where the needs of the patients regulated the working shift. The study findings indicated that caring may not be perceived when nurses use a task-oriented approach. However, when nurses practice a person-centered approach, using an attentive and attuned gaze, caring is conveyed. Caring in intensive care contexts needs to be assisted by a supportive environment design that cultivates the caring approach.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
USA: Wolters Kluwer, 2019
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21134 (URN)10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000267 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521-2013-969
Available from: 2019-05-31 Created: 2019-05-31 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Sepideh, O., Fridh, I., Lindahl, B. & Torkildsby, A.-B. (2019). The meanings of comfort in intensive care settings: the fusion of care and interior design revealed through a lexical and content analysis. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing Quarterly, 1-19
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The meanings of comfort in intensive care settings: the fusion of care and interior design revealed through a lexical and content analysis
2019 (English)In: Intensive and Critical Care Nursing Quarterly, ISSN 0887-9303, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

Providing comfort in an ICU setting is often related to pain relief and end-of-life care; environmental factors are often neglected, despite the major role of the environment on the patients’ wellbeing and comfort. The aim of this paper is to explore the meanings of comfort from a theoretical and empirical perspective to increase the understanding of what comfort means in ICU settings. A lexical analysis and serials of workshops were performed, and data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis. The findings from the theoretical analysis show that comfort has a broad range of synonyms related both to subjective experiences and objective and physical qualities. The findings from the empirical part reveal four themes: comfort in relation to nature, comfort in relation to situation and people, comfort in relation to place and comfort in relation to objects and material. Materiality, functionality, memory, culture and history stipulate comfort. It is challenging to discern what comfort is when it comes to an individual’s function and emotions. We also found that comfort is closely linked to nature and wellbeing.

Keywords
Patients’ rooms, health facilities, seminars and workshops, lexical analysis, content analysis
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21044 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521-2013-969
Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2019-08-05
Karlsson, J., Eriksson, T., Lindahl, B. & Fridh, I. (2019). The Patient’s Situation During Interhospital Intensive Care Unit-to-Unit Transfers: A Hermeneutical Observational Study. Qualitative Health Research, 1-12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Patient’s Situation During Interhospital Intensive Care Unit-to-Unit Transfers: A Hermeneutical Observational Study
2019 (English)In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Interhospital intensive care unit-to-unit transfers are an increasing phenomenon, earlier mainly studied from a patient safety perspective. Using data from video recordings and participant observations, the aim was to explore and interpret the observed nature of the patient’s situation during interhospital intensive care unit-to-unit transfers. Data collection from eight transfers resulted in over 7 hours of video material and field notes. Using a hermeneutical approach, three themes emerged: being visible and invisible; being in a constantly changing space; and being a fettered body in constant motion. The patient’s situation can be viewed as an involuntary journey, one where the patient exists in a constantly changing space drifting in and out of the health personnel’s attention and where movements from the journey become part of the patient’s body. Interhospital transfers of vulnerable patients emerge as a complex task, challenging the health personnel’s ability to maintain a caring atmosphere around these patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15874 (URN)10.1177/1049732319831664 (DOI)
Projects
Interhospitala överföringar inom intensivvård
Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2019-03-07 Last updated: 2019-03-13Bibliographically approved
Dahlborg, E., Brink, E. & Lindahl, B. (2018). A Theoretical Framework for Emancipatory Nursing With a Focus on Environment and Persons’ Own and Shared Lifeworld: A Theoretical Framework for Emancipatory Nursing. Advances in Nursing Science, 41(4), 340-350
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Theoretical Framework for Emancipatory Nursing With a Focus on Environment and Persons’ Own and Shared Lifeworld: A Theoretical Framework for Emancipatory Nursing
2018 (English)In: Advances in Nursing Science, ISSN 0161-9268, E-ISSN 1550-5014, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 340-350Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

By giving a brief overview of the meta concepts in nursing, with a focus on environment, we sketch a theoretical framework for an emancipatory perspective in nursing care practice. To meet the requirements of equality in care and treatment, we have in our theoretical framework added a critical lifeworld perspective to the anti oppressive practice, to meet requirements of equity in health care encounter. The proposed model of emancipatory nursing goes from overall ideological structures to ontological aspects of the everyday world. Based on the model, nurses could identify what kind of theoretical critical knowledge and thinking they require to conduct equal care and encounter the person behind the patient role.

Keywords
critical perspective, emancipatory nursing, environment, equal care, lifeworld, meta-concepts, sustainability
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21053 (URN)
Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved
Dahlborg, E., Brink, E. & Lindahl, B. (2018). A theoretical framework for emancipatory nursing – with focus on environment and persons` own and shared lifeworld. Advances in Nursing Science, 41(4), 340-350
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A theoretical framework for emancipatory nursing – with focus on environment and persons` own and shared lifeworld
2018 (English)In: Advances in Nursing Science, ISSN 0161-9268, E-ISSN 1550-5014, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 340-350Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
critical perspective; emancipatory nursing; environment; equal care; lifeworld; meta-concepts; sustainability
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15014 (URN)10.1097/ANS.0000000000000227 (DOI)000450880800009 ()30383562 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055900561 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-23 Created: 2018-08-23 Last updated: 2019-01-29Bibliographically approved
Sundberg, F., Fridh, I. & Lindahl, B. (2018). Abstracts, Poster Presentation for Qualitative Health Research Conference, 2017. Paper presented at Qualitative Health Research Conference. International Journal of Qualitative Methods, 17(1), 1-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Abstracts, Poster Presentation for Qualitative Health Research Conference, 2017
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, ISSN 1609-4069, E-ISSN 1609-4069, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 1-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Alberta: Sage Publications, 2018
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14297 (URN)10.1177/1609406917748703 (DOI)
Conference
Qualitative Health Research Conference
Available from: 2018-05-31 Created: 2018-05-31 Last updated: 2018-07-04Bibliographically approved
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