Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Claesson, Andreas
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 11) Show all publications
Claesson, A., Djärv, T., Norberg, P., Ring, M., Hollenberg, J., Axelsson, C., . . . Stromsoe, A. (2016). Medicalversus non medical etiology in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest-Changes inoutcome in relation to the revised Utstein template. Resuscitation, 110, 48-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Medicalversus non medical etiology in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest-Changes inoutcome in relation to the revised Utstein template
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 110, p. 48-55Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: The Utstein-style recommendations for reporting etiology and outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) from 2004 have recently been revised. Among other etiologies a medical category is now introduced, replacing the cardiac category from Utstein template 2004. AIM: The aim of this study is to describe characteristics and temporal trends from reporting OHCA etiology according to the revised Utstein template 2014 in regards to patient characteristics and 30-day survival rates. METHODS: This registry study is based on consecutive OHCA cases reported from the Emergency medical services (EMS) to the Swedish Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (SRCR) 1992-2014. Characteristics, including a presumed cardiac etiology in Utstein template 2004, were transcribed to a medical etiology in Utstein template 2014. RESULTS: Of a total of n=70,846 cases, 92% were categorized as having a medical etiology and 8% as having a non-medical cause. Using the new classifications, the 30-day survival rate has significantly increased over a 20-year period from 4.7% to 11.0% in the medical group and from 3% to 9.9% in the non-medical group (p</=0.001). Trauma was the most common cause in OHCA of a non-medical etiology (26%) with a 30-day survival rate of 3.4% whilst drowning and drug overdose had the highest survival rates (14% and 10% respectively). CONCLUSION: Based on Utstein 2014 categories of etiology, overall survival after OHCA with a medical etiology has more than doubled in a 20-year period and tripled for non-medical cases. Patients with a medical etiology found in a shockable rhythm have the highest chance of survival. There is great variability in characteristics among non-medical cases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13523 (URN)10.1016/j.resuscitation.2016.10.019 (DOI)000396380000016 ()27826118 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84995687675 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-16 Created: 2018-01-16 Last updated: 2018-12-21Bibliographically approved
Strandmark, R., Herlitz, J., Axelsson, C., Claesson, A., Bremer, A., Karlsson, T., . . . Ravn-Fischer, A. (2015). Determinants of pre-hospital pharmacological intervention and its association with outcome in acute myocardial infarction. Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, 15(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determinants of pre-hospital pharmacological intervention and its association with outcome in acute myocardial infarction
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Chest pain, Myocardial infarction, Emergency medical services, Early medical intervention, Aspirin, Nitroglycerin
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-9365 (URN)10.1186/s13049-015-0188-x (DOI)000365497300001 ()26626732 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84956786898 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-03-16 Created: 2016-03-16 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
Strandmark, R., Herlitz, J., Axelsson, C., Claesson, A., Bremer, A., Karlsson, T., . . . Ravn-Fischer, A. (2015). Determinants of pre-hospitalpharmacological intervention and its association with outcome in acutemyocardial infarction. Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, 23(105)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determinants of pre-hospitalpharmacological intervention and its association with outcome in acutemyocardial infarction
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 23, no 105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Chest pain; Myocardial infarction; Emergency medical services; Early medical intervention; Aspirin; Nitroglycerin
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-3357 (URN)10.1186/s13049-015-0188-x (DOI)000365497300001 ()26626732 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84956786898 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
Gelberg, J., Strömsöe, A., Hollenberg, J., Radell, P., Claesson, A., Svensson, L. & Herlitz, J. (2015). Improving Survival and Neurologic Function for Younger Age Groups After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Sweden: A 20-Year Comparison.. Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, 16(8), 750-757
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improving Survival and Neurologic Function for Younger Age Groups After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Sweden: A 20-Year Comparison.
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 1529-7535, E-ISSN 1947-3893, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 750-757Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To describe changes in the epidemiology of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden with the emphasis on the younger age groups.

DESIGN: Prospective observational study.

SETTING: Sweden.

PATIENTS: Patients were recruited from the Swedish Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation from 1990 to 2012. Only non-crew-witnessed cases were included.

INTERVENTION: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

MEASUREMENT AND MAIN RESULTS: The endpoint was 30-day survival. Cerebral function among survivors was estimated according to the cerebral performance category scores. In all, 50,879 patients in the survey had an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, of which 1,321 (2.6%) were 21 years old or younger and 1,543 (3.0%) were 22-35 years old. On the basis of results from 2011 and 2012, we estimated that there are 4.9 cases per 100,000 person-years in the age group 0-21 years. The highest survival was found in the 13- to 21-year age group (12.6%). Among patients 21 years old or younger, the following were associated with an increased chance of survival: increasing age, male gender, witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, ventricular fibrillation, and a short emergency medical service response time. Among patients 21 years old or younger , there was an increase in survival from 6.2% in 1992-1998 to 14.0% in 2007-2012. Among 30-day survivors, 91% had a cerebral performance category score of 1 or 2 (good cerebral performance or moderate cerebral disability) at hospital discharge.

CONCLUSIONS: In Sweden, among patients 21 years old or younger, five out-of-hospital cardiac arrests per 100,000 person-years occur and survival in this patient group has more than doubled during the past two decades. The majority of survivors have good or relatively good cerebral function.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-5418 (URN)10.1097/PCC.0000000000000503 (DOI)000369708000016 ()26218255 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84943147338 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-12-18 Created: 2015-12-18 Last updated: 2018-12-21Bibliographically approved
Strömsöe, A., Svensson, L., Axelsson, A., Claesson, A., Göransson, K., Nordberg, P. & Herlitz, J. (2014). Improved outcome in Sweden after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and possible association with improvements in every link in the chain of survival. European Heart Journal, 36(14)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improved outcome in Sweden after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and possible association with improvements in every link in the chain of survival
Show others...
2014 (English)In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, ISSN 0195-668, Vol. 36, no 14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims To describe out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in Sweden from a long-term perspective in terms of changes in outcome and circumstances at resuscitation. Methods and results All cases of OHCA (n = 59 926) reported to the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Register from 1992 to 2011 were included. The number of cases reported (n/100 000 person-years) increased from 27 (1992) to 52 (2011). Crew-witnessed cases, cardiopulmonary resuscitation prior to the arrival of the emergency medical service (EMS), and EMS response time increased (P < 0.0001). There was a decrease in the delay from collapse to calling for the EMS in all patients and from collapse to defibrillation among patients found in ventricular fibrillation (P < 0.0001). The proportion of patients found in ventricular fibrillation decreased from 35 to 25% (P < 0.0001). Thirty-day survival increased from 4.8 (1992) to 10.7% (2011) (P < 0.0001), particularly among patients found in a shockable rhythm and patients with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) at hospital admission. Among patients hospitalized with ROSC in 2008–2011, 41% underwent therapeutic hypothermia and 28% underwent percutaneous coronary intervention. Among 30-day survivors in 2008–2011, 94% had a cerebral performance category score of 1 or 2 at discharge from hospital and the results were even better if patients were found in a shockable rhythm. Conclusion From a long-term perspective, 30-day survival after OHCA in Sweden more than doubled. The increase in survival was most marked among patients found in a shockable rhythm and those hospitalized with ROSC. There were improvements in all four links in the chain of survival, which might explain the improved outcome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2014
Keywords
Prehospital Akutsjukvård
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Research subject
Integrated Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1999 (URN)10.1093/eurheartj/ehu240 (DOI)25205528 (PubMedID)2320/14551 (Local ID)2320/14551 (Archive number)2320/14551 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Hagiwara, M., Bremer, A., Claesson, A., Axelsson, C., Norberg, G. & Herlitz, J. (2014). The impact of direct admission to a catheterisation lab/CCU in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction on the delay to reperfusion and early risk of death: results of a systematic review including meta-analysis. Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, 22(67)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of direct admission to a catheterisation lab/CCU in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction on the delay to reperfusion and early risk of death: results of a systematic review including meta-analysis
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 22, no 67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background For each hour of delay from fist medical contact until reperfusion in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) there is a 10% increase in risk of death and heart failure. The aim of this review is to describe the impact of the direct admission of patients with STEMI to a Catheterisation laboratory (cath lab) as compared with transport to the emergency department (ED) with regard to delays and outcome. Methods Databases were searched for from April-June 2012 and updated January 2014: 1) Pubmed; 2) Embase; 3) Cochrane Library; 4) ProQuest Nursing and 5) Allied Health Sources. The search was restricted to studies in English, Swedish, Danish and Norwegian languages. The intervention was a protocol-based clinical pre-hospital pathway and main outcome measurements were the delay to balloon inflation and hospital mortality. Results Median delay from door to balloon was significantly shorter in the intervention group in all 5 studies reported. Difference in median delay varied between 16 minutes and 47 minutes. In all 7 included studies the time from symptom onset or first medical contact to balloon time was significantly shorter in the intervention group. The difference in median delay varied between 15 minutes and 1 hour and 35 minutes. Only two studies described hospital mortality. When combined the risk of death was reduced by 37%. Conclusion An overview of available studies of the impact of a protocol-based pre-hospital clinical pathway with direct admission to a cath lab as compared with the standard transport to the ED in ST-elevation AMI suggests the following. The delay to the start of revascularisation will be reduced. The clinical benefit is not clearly evidence based. However, the documented association between system delay and outcome defends the use of the pathway.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central Ltd., 2014
Keywords
Prehospital Akutsjukvård
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Nursing
Research subject
Integrated Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-2013 (URN)10.1186/s13049-014-0067-x (DOI)25420752 (PubMedID)2320/14578 (Local ID)2320/14578 (Archive number)2320/14578 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2018-08-17Bibliographically approved
Claesson, A. (2013). Lifesaving after cardiac arrest due to drowning. Characteristics and outcome.. (Doctoral dissertation). University of Gothenburg. Sahlgrenska Academy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lifesaving after cardiac arrest due to drowning. Characteristics and outcome.
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Aims The aim of this thesis was to describe out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) due to drowning from the following angles. In Paper I: To describe the characteristics of OHCA due to drowning and evaluate factors of importance for survival. In Paper II: To describe lifesaving skills and CPR competence among surf lifeguards. In Paper III: To describe the characteristics of interventions performed by the Swedish fire and rescue services (SFARS) and evaluate survival with or without rescue diving units. In Paper IV: To describe the prevalence of possible confounders for death due to drowning. In Paper V: To describe changes in characteristics and survival over time and again to evaluate factors of importance for survival Methods Papers I and III-V are based on retrospective register data from the Swedish OHCA Register reported by Emergency Medical Service (EMS) clinicians between 1990-2011. In addition, in Paper III, the data have been analysed and compared with the SFARS database for rescue characteristics. In Paper IV, the data have been compared with those of the National Board of Forensic Medicine (NBFM). Paper II is a descriptive study of 40 surf lifeguards evaluating delay and CPR quality as peformed on a manikin. Results Survival in OHCA due to drowning is about 10% and does not differ significantly from OHCA with a cardiac aetiology. The proportion of witnessed cases was low. Survival appears to increase with a short EMS response time, i.e. early advanced life support. Surf lifeguards perform CPR with sustained high quality, independent of prior physical strain. In half of about 7,000 drowning calls, there was need for a water rescue by the fire and rescue services. Among the OHCA in which CPR was initiated, a majority were found floating on the surface. Rescue diving took place in a small percentage of all cases. Survival when using rescue divers did not differ significantly from drownings where rescue diving units were not used. No survivors were found after >15 minutes of submersion in warm water. After submersion in cold water, survival with a good neurological outcome was extended. Among 2,166 autopsied cases of drowning, more than half were judged as accidents and about one third as intentional suicide cases. Among accidents, 14% were found to have a cardiac aetiology, while the corresponding figure among suicides was 0%. In a 20-year follow-up of OHCA due to drowning in Sweden, both bystander CPR and early survival to hospital admission are increasing. The proportion of cases alive after one month has not changed significantly during the period. Conclusions Survival from OHCA due to drowning is low. A reduction in the EMS response time appears to have high priority, i.e. early ALS is important. The quality of CPR among surf lifeguards appear to be high and not affected by prior physical strain. In all treated OHCA cases, the majority were found at the surface and survival when rescue diving took place did not appear to be poorer than in non-rescue diving cases. In a minor proportion of cases, cardiac disease could be a confounder for death due to drowning. Bystander CPR in OHCA due to drowning has increased over a 20-year period and the proportion of early survivors to hospital admission is increasing. We speculate that our studies were underpowered with regard to the opportunity adequately to assess the effects of bystander CPR on survival to hospital discharge. A uniform Swedish definition of drowning based on the recommended international terms should be implemented throughout Swedish authorities and health care, in order to enhance the quality of data and improve the potential for future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Gothenburg. Sahlgrenska Academy, 2013
Keywords
Drowning, Cardiac arrest, CPR, Lifesaving, Prehospen
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Integrated Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-3660 (URN)2320/12582 (Local ID)978-91-628-8724-7 (ISBN)2320/12582 (Archive number)2320/12582 (OAI)
Note

Disputationen sker Fredagen den 20 September 2013, kl. 13.00 Sahlgrens aula, Blå stråket 5, Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.

Available from: 2015-12-04 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2016-07-14Bibliographically approved
Claesson, A., Lindqvist, J., Ortenwall, P. & Herlitz, J. (2012). Characteristics of lifesaving from drowning as reported by the Swedish Fire and Rescue Services 1996-2010.. Resuscitation, 83(9), 1072-1077
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characteristics of lifesaving from drowning as reported by the Swedish Fire and Rescue Services 1996-2010.
2012 (English)In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 83, no 9, p. 1072-1077Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim We aimed to describe characteristics associated with rescue from drowning as reported by the Swedish Fire and Rescue Services (SFARS) and their association with survival from the Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) registry. Method This retrospective study is based on the OHCA registry and the Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency (SCCA) registry. All emergency calls (1996–2010) where the SFARS were dispatched were included (n = 7175). For analysis of survival, OHCAs that matched events from the SCCA registry were included (n = 250). Results Calls to lakes and ponds were predominant (35% of all calls reported). Rescues were more likely in cold water, <10 °C (45%), in open water (80%) and in April–September (68%). Median delay from a call to arrival of rescue services was 8 min, while it was 9 min for rescue diving units. Of all OHCA cases, the victim was found at the surface in 47% and underwater in 38%. In events where rescue divers were used, victims were significantly younger than in non-diving cardiac arrests and the mean diving depth was 6.3 ± 5.8 m. Overall survival to one month was 5.6% (13% in diving and 4.7% in non-diving cases; p = 0.07). Conclusion In half of more than 7000 drowning-related calls to the SFARS during 15 years of practice, water rescue was needed. In all treated OHCA cases, the majority were found at the surface. Only in a small percentage did rescue diving take place. In these cases, survival did not appear to be poorer than in non-diving cases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ireland Ltd, 2012
Keywords
Asphyxia, Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, CPR, Delay, Drowning, Fire and rescue service, Lifesaving, Rescue diving
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Integrated Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1429 (URN)10.1016/j.resuscitation.2012.05.025 (DOI)000309048600014 ()22705380 (PubMedID)2320/11768 (Local ID)2320/11768 (Archive number)2320/11768 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2017-11-16Bibliographically approved
Axelsson, C., Claesson, A., Engdahl, J., Herlitz, J., Hollenberg, J., Lindqvist, J., . . . Svensson, L. (2012). Outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest witnessed by EMS: changes over time and factors of importance for outcome in Sweden.. Resuscitation, 83(10), 1253-1258
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest witnessed by EMS: changes over time and factors of importance for outcome in Sweden.
Show others...
2012 (English)In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 83, no 10, p. 1253-1258Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Among patients who survive after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), a large proportion are recruited from cases witnessed by the Emergency Medical Service (EMS), since the conditions for success are most optimal in this subset. Aim To evaluate outcome after EMS-witnessed OHCA in a 20-year perspective in Sweden, with the emphasis on changes over time and factors of importance. Methods All patients included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Register from 1990 to 2009 were included. Results There were 48,349 patients and 13.5% of them were EMS witnessed. There was a successive increase in EMS-witnessed OHCA from 8.5% in 1992 to 16.9% in 2009 (p for trend < 0.0001). Among EMS-witnessed OHCA, the survival to one month increased from 13.9% in 1992 to 21.8% in 2009 (p for trend < 0.0001). Among EMS-witnessed OHCA, 51% were found in ventricular fibrillation, which was higher than in bystander-witnessed OHCA, despite a lower proportion with a presumed cardiac aetiology in the EMS-witnessed group. Among EMS-witnessed OHCA overall, 16.0% survived to one month, which was significantly higher than among bystander-witnessed OHCA. Independent predictors of a favourable outcome were: (1) initial rhythm ventricular fibrillation; (2) cardiac aetiology; (3) OHCA outside home and (4) decreasing age. Conclusion In Sweden, in a 20-year perspective, there was a successive increase in the proportion of EMS-witnessed OHCA. Among these patients, survival to one month increased over time. EMS-witnessed OHCA had a higher survival than bystander-witnessed OHCA. Independent predictors of an increased chance of survival were initial rhythm, aetiology, place and age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ireland Ltd, 2012
Keywords
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, Crew witnessed, Prognosis
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Integrated Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1433 (URN)10.1016/j.resuscitation.2012.01.043 (DOI)000309050600026 ()22388092 (PubMedID)2320/11772 (Local ID)2320/11772 (Archive number)2320/11772 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2017-09-06Bibliographically approved
Claesson, A., Karlsson, T., Thorén, A.-B. & Herlitz, J. (2011). Delay and performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in surf lifeguards after simulated cardiac arrest due to drowning.. American Journal of Emergency Medicine, 29(9), 1044-1050
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Delay and performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in surf lifeguards after simulated cardiac arrest due to drowning.
2011 (English)In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 0735-6757, E-ISSN 1532-8171, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1044-1050Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract PURPOSE: To describe time delay during surf rescue and compare the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) before and after exertion in surf lifeguards. METHODS: A total of 40 surf lifeguards at the Tylösand Surf Lifesaving Club in Sweden (65% men; age, 19-43 years) performed single-rescuer CPR for 10 minutes on a Laerdal SkillmeteÔ Resusci Anne manikin. The test was repeated with an initial simulated surf rescue on an unconscious 80-kg victim 100 m from the shore. The time to victim, to first ventilation, and to the start of CPR was documented. RESULTS: The mean time in seconds to the start of ventilations in the water was 155 ± 31 (mean ± SD) and to the start of CPR, 258 ± 44. Men were significantly faster during rescue (mean difference, 43 seconds) than women (P = .002). The mean compression depth (millimeters) at rest decreased significantly from 0-2 minutes (42.6 ± 7.8) to 8-10 minutes (40.8 ± 9.3; P = .02). The mean compression depth after exertion decreased significantly (44.2 ± 8.7 at 0-2 minutes to 41.5 ± 9.1 at 8-10 minutes; P = .0008). The compression rate per minute decreased after rescue from 117.2 ±14.3 at 0 to 2 minutes to 114.1 ± 16.1 after 8 to 10 minutes (P = .002). The percentage of correct compressions at 8 to 10 minutes was identical before and after rescue (62%). CONCLUSION: In a simulated drowning, 100 m from shore, it took twice as long to bring the patient back to shore as to reach him; and men were significantly faster. Half the participants delivered continuous chest compressions of more than 38 mm during 10 minutes of single-rescuer CPR. The quality was identical before and after surf rescue. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
W.B. Saunders Co., 2011
Keywords
Lifeguards, CPR, Drowning, Cardiac arrest due to drowning
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Integrated Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1318 (URN)10.1016/j.ajem.2010.06.026 (DOI)20870373 (PubMedID)2320/11409 (Local ID)2320/11409 (Archive number)2320/11409 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2017-09-04Bibliographically approved

Search in DiVA

Show all publications