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Fridh, Isabell
Publications (10 of 52) Show all publications
Palmér, L., Nyström, M., Carlsson, G., Ekebergh, M., Fridh, I., Lindberg, E. & Wireklint Sundström, B. (2022). Caring Science With a Focus on Existential Issues in a Caring Context: A Research Area Inspired by Existential Philosophy. International journal for human caring, 26(3), 1-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caring Science With a Focus on Existential Issues in a Caring Context: A Research Area Inspired by Existential Philosophy
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2022 (English)In: International journal for human caring, ISSN 1091-5710, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines and exemplifies how existential philosophy can provide a deeper understanding of existential issues in a caring context. Existential philosophy, including lifeworld theory, is treated both as an epistemology for the development of research methods and inspiration for analysis and discussions in caring science research. The significance of the lifeworld is also highlighted as a guide to perform and enable caring and caring didactics, along with short descriptions where existential philosophy has previously influenced the development of caring science. The concept of existential caring science is suggested as a research area for research on existential and meaning-oriented phenomena.

Keywords
caring science, caring, existential, phenomenology, hermeneutics, lifeworld
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-28468 (URN)10.20467/HumanCaring-D-21-00014 (DOI)2-s2.0-85138554015 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-09-01 Created: 2022-09-01 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Sundberg, F., Fridh, I., Lindahl, B. & Kåreholt, I. (2021). Associations between healthcare environment design and adverse events in intensive care unit. Nursing in Critical Care, 26(2), 86-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between healthcare environment design and adverse events in intensive care unit
2021 (English)In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 86-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Healthcare environment can affect health. Adverse events (AEs) are common because rapid changes in the patients' status can suddenly arise, and have serious consequences, especially in intensive care. The relationship between the design of intensive care units (ICUs) and AEs has not been fully explored. Hence, an intensive care room was refurbished with cyclic lightning, sound absorbents and unique interior, and exterior design to promote health.

Aims

The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences between a regular and a refurbished intensive care room in risk for AEs among critically ill patients.

Design

This study retrospectively evaluated associations of AEs and compared the incidence of AEs in patients who were assigned to a multidisciplinary ICU in a refurbished two‐bed patient room with patients in the control rooms between 2011 and 2018.

Methods

There were 1938 patients included in this study (1382 in control rooms; 556 in the intervention room). Descriptive statistics were used to present the experienced AEs. Binary logistic regressions were conducted to estimate the relationship between the intervention/control rooms and variables concerning AEs. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05.

Results

For the frequency of AEs, there were no significant differences between the intervention room and the control rooms (10.6% vs 11%, respectively, P < 0.805). No findings indicated the intervention room (the refurbished room) had a significant influence on decreasing the number of experienced AEs in critically ill patients.

Conclusions

The findings revealed a low incident of AEs in both the intervention room as well as in the control rooms, lower than previously described. However, our study did not find any decreases in the AEs due to the design of the rooms.

Relevance to clinical practice

Further research is needed to determine the relationship between the physical environment and AEs in critically ill patients.

Keywords
Intensive care, environment, evidence-based design
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-24415 (URN)10.1111/nicc.12513 (DOI)000531566400001 ()32395862 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85084470442 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-12-14 Created: 2020-12-14 Last updated: 2021-12-20Bibliographically approved
Bazzi, M., Fridh, I., Ahlberg, K., Bergbom, I., Hellström, M. & Lundèn, M. (2021). Collaboration in the Hybrid Operating Room: A Focus Group Study From the Perspective of the Nursing Staff. Journal of Radiology Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collaboration in the Hybrid Operating Room: A Focus Group Study From the Perspective of the Nursing Staff
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2021 (English)In: Journal of Radiology Nursing, ISSN 1546-0843, E-ISSN 1555-9912Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Technical advancements in the operating room setting continue, and the concept of the hybrid operating room is promoted and accepted worldwide. The hybrid setting means inclusion of radiology in the already complex environment of a traditional operating room. Collaboration in this type of environment becomes essential and investigating how the nursing staff experiences this collaboration in the hybrid operating room is needed. The aim of the study was to investigate how the nursing staff from the specialties of surgery, anesthesiology, and radiology experienced collaborating in a hybrid operating room. Explorative qualitative design was used. Five focus groups consisting of operating room nurses, operating room assistant nurses, nurse anesthetists, assistant nurse anesthetists, and radiographers were included in the study. Interviews using semistructured questions were conducted. Directive content analysis was used for the data analysis. The following categories revealed: (1) different patient safety perspectives; (2) responsibilities being shared and divided; (3) collaboration becoming better over time; (4) uneven division of labor in a strained work situation and different terms of employment; (5) lack of education and joint meetings; and (6) environmental constraints for satisfying collaboration. The nursing staff in the hybrid operating room highlighted they worked toward a common goal but prioritized their own specific tasks rather than the procedure as a whole. This, together with the uneven task distribution and unclear responsibilities, could create tension between the different staff categories, impacting procedures negatively. The results revealed the importance of proper preparation of the staff to work in the hybrid operating room. Having team building activities, common meetings, relevant training to meet educational needs, and adjusting the team composition could improve hybrid operating room collaboration and improve patient safety and outcomes. 

Keywords
Collaboration, Hybrid operating room, Nursing staff, Patient safety
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-25986 (URN)10.1016/j.jradnu.2021.04.007 (DOI)2-s2.0-85106666340 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-07-08 Created: 2021-07-08 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Jensen, H. I., Åkerman, E., Lind, R., Alfheim, H. B., Frivold, G., Fridh, I. & Ågård, A. S. (2021). Conditions and strategies to meet the challenges imposed by the COVID-19-related visiting restrictions in the intensive care unit: A Scandinavian cross-sectional study. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, Article ID 103116.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conditions and strategies to meet the challenges imposed by the COVID-19-related visiting restrictions in the intensive care unit: A Scandinavian cross-sectional study
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2021 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, article id 103116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To examine conditions and strategies to meet the challenges imposed by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-related visiting restrictions in Scandinavian intensive care units. Research methodology/design: A cross-sectional survey. Setting: Adult intensive care units in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Main outcome measures: Likert scale responses and free-text comments within six areas: capacity and staffing, visiting policies and access to the unit, information and conferences with relatives, written information, children as relatives and follow-up initiatives. Results: The overall response rate was 53% (74/140 participating units). All intensive care units had planned for capacity extensions; the majority ranging between 11 and 30 extra beds. From March–June 2020, units had a mean maximum of 9.4 COVID-19 patients simultaneously. Allowing restricted visiting was more common in Denmark (52%) and Norway (61%) than in Sweden where visiting was mostly denied except for dying patients (68%), due to a particular increased number of COVID-19 patients. The restrictions forced nurses to compromise on their usual standards of family care. Numerous models for maintaining contact between relatives and patients were described. Conclusion: Visitation restrictions compromised the quality of family care and entailed dilemmas for healthcare professionals but also spurred initiatives to developing new ways of providing family care. © 2021 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Churchill Livingstone, 2021
Keywords
COVID-19, Family, ICU, Relatives, Survey, Visitation
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-27025 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2021.103116 (DOI)000734041300017 ()2-s2.0-85112550293 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-12-14 Created: 2021-12-14 Last updated: 2022-09-14Bibliographically approved
Fridh, I. (2021). Etik och palliativ vård inom intensivvård. AnIva VENTILEN, 55(3), 6-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Etik och palliativ vård inom intensivvård
2021 (Swedish)In: AnIva VENTILEN, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 6-9Article in journal (Other academic) Published
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-27866 (URN)
Note

Artikel i tidskrift för yrkesnätverk.

Available from: 2022-05-11 Created: 2022-05-11 Last updated: 2022-05-23Bibliographically approved
Galazzi, A., Adamini, I., Bazzano, G., Cancelli, L., Fridh, I., Laquintana, D., . . . Rasero, L. (2021). Intensive care unit diaries to help bereaved family members in their grieving process: a systematic review. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, Article ID 103121.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intensive care unit diaries to help bereaved family members in their grieving process: a systematic review
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2021 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, article id 103121Article, review/survey (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

Background: Intensive care unit diaries are often used to support patients during their psychological recovery. The intensive care unit stay can be upsetting, disturbing and traumatic for both patients and their families especially when the patient does not survive. Aim: To investigate the connection between intensive care unit diaries and the grieving process experienced by family members of adult patients deceased in the intensive care unit. Methods: Systematic literature review according to PRISMA guidelines: PubMed, CINAHL and Cochrane Library were consulted. The Caldwell's framework was used for the quality appraisal. Results: Only six studies examine this topic. The potential benefits of intensive care unit diaries in family members’ bereavement process may be an aid to realise how extremely ill their loved one was, may provide comfort and may help relatives to cope with their loss. Conclusion: The use of intensive care unit diaries to help family members’ bereavement process may be a useful tool but further research is necessary to better understand their role and benefits. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Churchill Livingstone, 2021
Keywords
Bereavement, Critical care nursing, Diary, End of life, Family members, Grieving process, Intensive care, Relatives, Systematic review
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-26232 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2021.103121 (DOI)000734041300025 ()2-s2.0-85112026506 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-08-16 Created: 2021-08-16 Last updated: 2022-09-14Bibliographically approved
Engwall, M., Jutengren, G., Bergbom, I., Lindahl, B. & Fridh, I. (2021). Patients' Self-Reported Recovery After an Environmental Intervention Aimed to Support Patient's Circadian Rhythm in Intensive Care. Health Environments Research & Design Journal, 14(4), Article ID 19375867211001541.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' Self-Reported Recovery After an Environmental Intervention Aimed to Support Patient's Circadian Rhythm in Intensive Care
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2021 (English)In: Health Environments Research & Design Journal, ISSN 1937-5867, E-ISSN 2167-5112, Vol. 14, no 4, article id 19375867211001541Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Patients in intensive care units (ICUs) are among the most vulnerable, and they require support to start their recovery. The design of the patient area in the ICU can play a prominent role in both the quality of care and patients' recovery. The lighting environment has the opportunity to restore and strengthen the natural human circadian rhythm and health.

AIM: To evaluate patients' self-reported recovery after being cared for in an ICU room rebuilt according to evidence-based design principles that promote recovery.

METHOD: An intervention was set up in a two-bed patient room including a cycled lighting system. Self-reported recovery was reported at 6 and 12 months after discharge. Data were analyzed using a 2(mechanically ventilated, nonmechanically ventilated) × 2(intervention room, ordinary room) analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and 2(male, women) × 2(intervention room, ordinary room) ANCOVA.

RESULTS: Data from the different rooms showed no significant main effects for recovery after 6 months, p = .21; however, after 12 months, it become significant, p. < .05. This indicated that patient recovery was positively influenced for patients cared for in the intervention room (M = 8.88, SD = 4.07) compared to the ordinary room (M = 10.90, SD = 4.26). There were no interaction effects for gender or if the patients had been mechanically ventilated either at 6 or 12 months' postdischarge.

CONCLUSIONS: A cycled lighting system may improve patient self-reported recovery after ICU care; however, more research on the topic is needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Open, 2021
Keywords
ANOVA, circadian rhythm, environment, intensive care unit (ICU), lighting, longitudinal, questionnaire, recovery, sleep
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-25201 (URN)10.1177/19375867211001541 (DOI)000634026500001 ()33754878 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85103189340 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agency: Bertil and Britt Svenssons' Foundation.

Available from: 2021-03-25 Created: 2021-03-25 Last updated: 2023-01-17Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, E. & Fridh, I. (2021). Postgraduate nursing students' experiences of simulation training and reflection in end-of-life communication with intensive care patients and their families. Nursing and Health Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postgraduate nursing students' experiences of simulation training and reflection in end-of-life communication with intensive care patients and their families
2021 (English)In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Nursing & Health Sciences, E-ISSN 1442-2018Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Losing a loved one in the intensive care unit relates to a risk of developing stress and complicated grief. Education in intensive care nursing should cover end-of-life care, and the use of simulation in nursing education is a powerful instrument to develop confidence in end-of-life care. The aim of this study was to explore postgraduate nursing students' experiences with simulation training in end-of-life communication with intensive care patients and their families. Twenty-nine students answered a questionnaire and nine students participated in an interview. Analyses were conducted according to the principles of phenomenography. The result is presented in four categories including the following: the design of the scenario affects learning, uncertainty overshadows learning, intertwining theory and practice contributes to learning, and learning to encounter existential dimensions. The conclusion is that high-fidelity simulation training contributes toward preparing students to be attuned to what it can be like to be a family member in this situation. The scenarios contributed toward preparing the students to engage in end-of-life conversations during clinical placements.

Keywords
end-of-life communication, intensive care, nurse education, qualitative studies, simulation training, EDUCATION, NURSES, PERCEPTIONS
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-26603 (URN)10.1111/nhs.12873 (DOI)000697897300001 ()34436818 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85114763094 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-10-04 Created: 2021-10-04 Last updated: 2021-10-21
Sundberg, F., Fridh, I., Lindahl, B. & Kåreholt, I. (2021). Visitor’s Experiences of an Evidence-Based Designed Healthcare Environment in an Intensive Care Unit. Health Environments Research & Design Journal, 14(2), 178-191
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visitor’s Experiences of an Evidence-Based Designed Healthcare Environment in an Intensive Care Unit
2021 (English)In: Health Environments Research & Design Journal, ISSN 1937-5867, E-ISSN 2167-5112, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 178-191Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The objective of the research was to study the visitors’ experiences of different healthcare environment designs of intensive care unit (ICU) patient rooms.

Background: The healthcare environment may seem frightening and overwhelming in times when life-threatening conditions affect a family member or close friend and individuals visit the patient in an ICU. A two-bed patient room was refurbished to enhance the well-being of patients and their families according to the principles of evidence-based design (EBD). No prior research has used the Person-centred ClimateQuestionnaire—Family version (PCQ-F) or the semantic environment description (SMB) in the ICUsetting.

Methods: A sample of 99 visitors to critically ill patients admitted to a multidisciplinary ICU completed a questionnaire; 69 visited one of the two control rooms, while 30 visited the interventionroom.

Results: For the dimension of everydayness in the PCQ-F, a significantly better experience was expressed for the intervention room (p<.030); the dimension regarding the ward climate general was also perceived as higher in the intervention room (p<.004). The factors of pleasantness (p<.019), and complexity (p<0.049), showed significant differences favoring the intervention room in the SMB, with borderline significance on the modern factor (p<.061).

Conclusion: Designing and implementing an enriched healthcare environment in the ICU setting increases person-centered care in relation to the patients’ visitors. This could lead to better outcomes for the visitors, for example, decreasing post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, but this needs further investigations

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Open, 2021
Keywords
academic research, family-centered care, intensive care unit (ICU), interior design, access to nature, design research, evidence-based design (EBD), nursing research, patient-/person-centered care, patient room design
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-23688 (URN)10.1177/1937586720943471 (DOI)000554380000001 ()32734781 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85088835842 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521-2013-969
Available from: 2020-08-12 Created: 2020-08-12 Last updated: 2021-12-20Bibliographically approved
Sundberg, F., Fridh, I., Lindahl, B. & Ingemar, K. (2020). Associations between healthcare environment design and adverse events in intensive care unit. Nursing in Critical Care
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between healthcare environment design and adverse events in intensive care unit
2020 (English)In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: Healthcare environment can affect health. Adverse events (AEs) are common because rapid changes in the patients' status can suddenly arise, and have serious consequences, especially in intensive care. The relationship between the design of intensive care units (ICUs) and AEs has not been fully explored. Hence, an intensive care room was refurbished with cyclic lightning, sound absorbents and unique interior, and exterior design to promote health.

Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences between a regular and a refurbished intensive care room in risk for AEs among critically ill patients.

Design: This study retrospectively evaluated associations of AEs and compared the incidence of AEs in patients who were assigned to a multidisciplinary ICU in a refurbished two-bed patient room with patients in the control rooms between 2011 and 2018.

Methods: There were 1938 patients included in this study (1382 in control rooms; 556 in the intervention room). Descriptive statistics were used to present the experi-enced AEs. Binary logistic regressions were conducted to estimate the relationship between the intervention/control rooms and variables concerning AEs. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05.

Results: For the frequency of AEs, there were no significant differences between the intervention room and the control rooms (10.6% vs 11%, respectively, P < 0.805). No findings indicated the intervention room (the refurbished room) had a significant influence on decreasing the number of experienced AEs in critically ill patients.

Conclusions: The findings revealed a low incident of AEs in both the intervention room as well as in the control rooms, lower than previously described. However, our study did not find any decreases in the AEs due to the design of the rooms.

Relevance to clinical practice: Further research is needed to determine the relation-ship between the physical environment and AEs in critically ill patients.

Keywords
complex interventions, critical care nursing, intensive care, quantitative research, research
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Human Perspective in Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-23220 (URN)10.1111/nicc.12513 (DOI)000531566400001 ()32395862 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85084470442 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521‐2013‐969
Available from: 2020-05-20 Created: 2020-05-20 Last updated: 2024-02-01
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