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Souza Filho, P., Nair, R., Andersson, D., Lennartsson, P. R. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2018). Vegan-mycoprotein concentrate from pea-processing industry byproduct using edible filamentous fungi. Fungal Biology and Biotechnology, 5(5)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vegan-mycoprotein concentrate from pea-processing industry byproduct using edible filamentous fungi
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2018 (English)In: Fungal Biology and Biotechnology, ISSN 2054-3085, Vol. 5, no 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Currently around one billion people in the world do not have access to a diet which provides enough protein and energy. However, the production of one of the main sources of protein, animal meat, causes severe impacts on the environment. The present study investigates the production of a vegan-mycoprotein concentrate from pea-industry byproduct (PpB), using edible filamentous fungi, with potential application in human nutrition. Edible fungal strains of Ascomycota (Aspergillus oryzaeFusarium venenatumMonascus purpureusNeurospora intermedia) and Zygomycota (Rhizopus oryzae) phyla were screened and selected for their protein production yield.

Results

A. oryzae had the best performance among the tested fungi, with a protein yield of 0.26 g per g of pea-processing byproduct from the bench scale airlift bioreactor cultivation. It is estimated that by integrating the novel fungal process at an existing pea-processing industry, about 680 kg of fungal biomass attributing to about 38% of extra protein could be produced for each 1 metric ton of pea-processing byproduct. This study is the first of its kind to demonstrate the potential of the pea-processing byproduct to be used by filamentous fungi to produce vegan-mycoprotein for human food applications.

Conclusion

The pea-processing byproduct (PpB) was proved to be an efficient medium for the growth of filamentous fungi to produce a vegan-protein concentrate. Moreover, an industrial scenario for the production of vegan-mycoprotein concentrate for human nutrition is proposed as an integrated process to the existing PPI production facilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Pea-processing byproduct, Edible filamentous fungi, Vegan-mycoprotein concentrate, Meat substitute
National Category
Other Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14904 (URN)10.1186/s40694-018-0050-9 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-08-08 Created: 2018-08-08 Last updated: 2018-08-09Bibliographically approved
Souza Filho, P. & Zamani, A. (2017). Production of Edible Fungi from Potato Protein Liquor (PPL) in Airlift Bioreactor. Fermentation, 3(1), 12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Production of Edible Fungi from Potato Protein Liquor (PPL) in Airlift Bioreactor
2017 (English)In: Fermentation, ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 12-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Potato protein liquor (PPL), a side stream from the potato starch industry, is normally used as fertilizer. However, with more than 100 g/L of sugars, 20 g/L of Kjeldahl nitrogen and Chemical Oxigen Demand (COD) of 300 g/L, it represents serious environmental challenges. The use of PPL for fungal cultivation is a promising solution to convert this waste into valuable products. In this study, PPL was characterized and used to cultivate edible zygomycete Rhizopus oryzae, which is widely used in Southeast Asian cuisine to prepare e.g., tempeh. Moreover, it can be potentially used as a protein source in animal feed worldwide. Under the best conditions, 65.47 ± 2.91 g of fungal biomass per litre of PPL was obtained in airlift bioreactors. The total Kjeldahl nitrogen content of the biomass was above 70 g/kg dry biomass. The best results showed 51% reduction of COD and 98.7% reduction in the total sugar content of PPL.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel, Switzerland: , 2017
Keywords
airlift bioreactor; filamentous fungal biomass; fungal pellets; potato protein liquor; Rhizopus oryzae
National Category
Water Treatment
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14903 (URN)10.3390/fermentation3010012 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-08-08 Created: 2018-08-08 Last updated: 2018-08-08Bibliographically approved
Souza Filho, P., Brancoli, P., Bolton, K., Zamani, A. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2017). Techno-Economic and Life Cycle Assessment of Wastewater Management from Potato Starch Production: Present Status and Alternative Biotreatments. Fermentation, 3(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Techno-Economic and Life Cycle Assessment of Wastewater Management from Potato Starch Production: Present Status and Alternative Biotreatments
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2017 (English)In: Fermentation, Vol. 3, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute, 2017
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13421 (URN)10.3390/fermentation3040056 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Souza Filho, P., Zamani, A. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2015). Solid Precipitation from Potato Protein Liquor by Ethanol. In: : . Paper presented at 10th European Congress of Chemical Engineering, Nice France, September 2 6- October 1, 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Solid Precipitation from Potato Protein Liquor by Ethanol
2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The production of starch in European Union (EU 28) was around 10 million tonnes in 2013, 12.6% of them being from potato1. During the potato processing, two main by-products which have high Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD) are formed, i.e. potato pulp (PP) and potato liquor (PL)2. Proteins can be partially recovered from PL, resulting in a concentrated residual material known as potato protein liquor (PoPL)2,3. The use of PoPL has been investigated to cultivate fungal4 and yeast3 biomass, and produce enzymes2. However, presence of nitrogen and phosphate containing materials as well as suspended solids at high concentrations4 limits its application in bioprocesses. The present study was proposed to investigate the precipitation of components from PoPL by ethanol in order to get an easily fermentable solution. PoPL from Lyckeby Starch AB was mixed with different amounts of ethanol and centrifuged at 3000 g for 5 min. The liquid obtained was put under a fume hood for 48 h at room temperature for ethanol evaporation. All the samples had their volumes adjusted to the same value using distilled water. The precipitate was dried at 105 °C. All experiments were done in duplicate. The precipitation of solids improved almost 500% for a mixture of equal volumes of PoPL and ethanol compared to PoPL without ethanol addition. The protein and ash contents of the precipitate were respectively higher than 245 g/kg and 420 g/kg in all the cases, making it eligible for production of fertilizer or animal feed. Most of the analysed sugars (glucose, fructose, and sucrose) stayed in the liquid phase. Ethanol concentration in the liquid phase remained close to initial value after the 48-hour evaporation. This indicates the need for a distillation column for ethanol recovery before the remaining sugar solution can be used for fermentation purposes.

Keywords
Potato Protein Liquor; Protein Precipitation; Animal Feed
National Category
Other Chemical Engineering
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-8396 (URN)
Conference
10th European Congress of Chemical Engineering, Nice France, September 2 6- October 1, 2015.
Available from: 2016-01-11 Created: 2016-01-11 Last updated: 2018-04-03Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1711-7294

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