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Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 40) Show all publications
Andersson Hagiwara, M., Magnusson, C., Herlitz, J., Seffel, E., Axelsson, C., Munters, M., . . . Nilsson, L. (2019). Adverse events in prehospital emergency care: a trigger tool study. BMC Emergency Medicine, 19(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adverse events in prehospital emergency care: a trigger tool study
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2019 (English)In: BMC Emergency Medicine, Vol. 19, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Prehospital emergency care has developed rapidly during the past decades. The care is given in a complex context which makes prehospital care a potential high-risk activity when it comes to patient safety. Patient safety in the prehospital setting has been only sparsely investigated. The aims of the present study were 1) To investigate the incidence of adverse events (AEs) in prehospital care and 2) To investigate the factors contributing to AEs in prehospital care.

Keywords
Emergency medical service, Adverse events, Patient safety, Trigger tool, Prehospital
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15726 (URN)10.1186/s12873-019-0228-3 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-02-04 Created: 2019-02-04 Last updated: 2019-02-07Bibliographically approved
Andersson Hagiwara, M., Wireklint Sundström, B., Brink, P., Herlitz, J. & Hansson, P.-O. (2018). A shorter system delay for haemorrhagic stroke than ischaemic stroke among patients who use emergency medical service.. Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A shorter system delay for haemorrhagic stroke than ischaemic stroke among patients who use emergency medical service.
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2018 (English)In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: We compare various aspects in the early chain of care among patients with haemorrhagic stroke and ischaemic stroke.

MATERIALS & METHODS: The Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and nine emergency hospitals, each with a stroke unit, were included. All patients hospitalised with a first and a final diagnosis of stroke between 15 December 2010 and 15 April 2011 were included. The primary endpoint was the system delay (from call to the EMS until diagnosis). Secondary endpoints were: (i) use of the EMS, (ii) delay from symptom onset until call to the EMS; (iii) priority at the dispatch centre; (iv) priority by the EMS; and (v) suspicion of stroke by the EMS nurse and physician on admission to hospital.

RESULTS: Of 1336 patients, 172 (13%) had a haemorrhagic stroke. The delay from call to the EMS until diagnosis was significantly shorter in haemorrhagic stroke. The patient's decision time was significantly shorter in haemorrhagic stroke. The priority level at the dispatch centre did not differ between the two groups, whereas the EMS nurse gave a significantly higher priority to patients with haemorrhage. There was no significant difference between groups with regard to the suspicion of stroke either by the EMS nurse or by the physician on admission to hospital.

CONCLUSIONS: Patients with a haemorrhagic stroke differed from other stroke patients with a more frequent and rapid activation of EMS.

Keywords
EMS, prehospital, stroke, system delay
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13521 (URN)10.1111/ane.12895 (DOI)000429693800010 ()29315463 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85040200414 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-17 Created: 2018-01-17 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
Backlund, P., Maurin Söderholm, H., Engström, H., Andersson Hagiwara, M. & Lebram, M. (2018). Breaking Out of the Bubble Putting Simulation Into Context to Increase Immersion and Performance. Simulation & Gaming, Article ID 1046878118772612.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breaking Out of the Bubble Putting Simulation Into Context to Increase Immersion and Performance
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2018 (English)In: Simulation & Gaming, article id 1046878118772612Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Simulation based training with full-size mannequins is a prominent means of training within the healthcare sector. Prehospital missions include all parts of the healthcare process which take place before a patient is handed over to the receiving hospital. This implies that the context for prehospital care is varied and potentially challenging or dangerous in several ways. In this article we present a study which explores immersion and performance by emergency medical services (EMS) professionals in in a training situation which takes the specifics of prehospital interventions into account.

Methods: The study was carried out as a field experiment at an ambulance unit. The experiment was designed to compare the differences between two types of medical scenarios: basic and contextualized. We analyzed the levels of immersion throughout the scenarios and then team performance was evaluated by independent experts. Both analyses were made by observing video recordings from multiple camera angles with a custom made analysis tool.

Results: Our results show that the contextualization of a medical scenario increases both immersion as measured by the Immersion Score Rating Instrument (ISRI) and team performance as measured by the Global Rating Scale (GRS). The overall ISRI score was higher in the contextualized condition as compared to the basic condition, with an average team wise difference of 2.94 (sd = 1.45). This difference is significant using a paired, two-tailed t-test (p<.001). The GRS score was higher for overall clinical performance in the contextualized scenario with an average team wise difference of 0.83 (sd = 0.83, p=.005).Conclusions. Full-size mannequin simulation based training for EMS professionals may be enhanced by contextualizing the medical scenarios. The main benefits are that the contextualized scenarios better take prehospital medical challenges into account and allow participants to perform better.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14277 (URN)10.1177/1046878118772612 (DOI)2-s2.0-85047428895 (Scopus ID)
Projects
SAREK
Funder
Region Västra Götaland
Available from: 2018-05-29 Created: 2018-05-29 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
Sterner, A., Nyström, M., Ramstrand, N., Andersson Hagiwara, M. & Palmér, L. (2018). Novice Nurses Perceptions Of Their Ability To Care In Acute Situations. In: : . Paper presented at 3rd Global Conference on Emergency Nursing & Trauma Care, Leeuwenhorst, 4-6 October,.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Novice Nurses Perceptions Of Their Ability To Care In Acute Situations
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction

Nurses have an essential role in acute care situations for preventing adverse events and improve patient outcomes as they typically have most patient contact and are often first to detect acute sickness (Della Ratta, 2016). Education and experience is highlighted as important for developing nurses ability in acute situations (Massey et al., 2017). The aim of this study was to describe what affects novice nurses’ ability to care in acute situations.

Method: Qualitative descriptive design with a phenomenographic approach. Data consisted of 17 interviews of novice nurses working in acute care hospitals in Sweden. Novice are defined as less than 1 year of working experience. The context acute situations following Sterner et al. (2017) findings that acute situations is more than physical deterioration of patients.

Results: Experience of acute situations is perceived as significant for developing the pivotal knowledge and ability to care in acute situations. Clinical practice is not a guarantee for this experience during nurse education. Reasons for this could be that nothing acute happened during allocated shifts. If an acute situation occurred the student could be allocated additional assignments or sent home. The skills obtained in acute situations are perceived as a lottery dependent upon where you get your clinical practice assigned.

Discussion: Experience is perceived as significant for developing ability to care in acute situations. If nurse education can’t facilitate learning of and in acute situations during clinical practice, simulation can be a method for developing the ability. When nursing students train, it is important to include different factors such as time pressure, surprises, contact with different occupational groups and next of kin to facilitate the ability to care in acute situations.

References

DELLA RATTA, C. 2016. Challenging graduate nurses' transition: Care of the deteriorating

patient. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 25, 3036-3048.

MASSEY, D., CHABOYER, W. & ANDERSON, V. 2017. What factors influence ward nurses’ recognition of and response to patient deterioration? An integrative review of the literature.Nursing open, 4, 6-23.

STERNER, A., RAMSTRAND, N., NYSTRÖM, M., HAGIWARA, M. A. & PALMÉR, L. 2017. Novice nurses’ perceptions of acute situations–a phenomenographic study. International emergency nursing.

Keywords
Novice nurses, Acute situation, Ability, Simulation
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15104 (URN)
Conference
3rd Global Conference on Emergency Nursing & Trauma Care, Leeuwenhorst, 4-6 October,
Available from: 2018-09-18 Created: 2018-09-18 Last updated: 2018-09-26Bibliographically approved
Hulldin, M., Kängström, J., Andersson Hagiwara, M. & Claesson, A. (2018). Perceived exertion using two different EMS stretcher systems, report from a Swedish study.. American Journal of Emergency Medicine, Article ID S0735-6757(18)30157-8.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceived exertion using two different EMS stretcher systems, report from a Swedish study.
2018 (English)In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 0735-6757, E-ISSN 1532-8171, article id S0735-6757(18)30157-8Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Emergency medical services (EMS) facilitate out of hospital care in a wide variety of settings on a daily basis. Stretcher-related adverse events and long term musculoskeletal injuries are commonly reported. Novel stretcher mechanisms may facilitate enhanced movement of patients and reduce workload for EMS personnel.

AIM: To describe EMS personnel's perceived exertion using two different stretcher systems.

METHODS: The methodology of this explorative simulation study included enrolling twenty (n=20) registered nurses and paramedics who worked in ten pairs (n=10) to transport a conscious, 165lb. (75kg) patient using two different EMS stretcher systems: the Pensi stretcher labeled A and the ALLFA stretcher labeled B. The ten pairs (n=10) were randomized to use either an A stretcher or a B stretcher with subsequent crossover. The pairs performed six identical tasks with each stretcher, including conveying stretchers from an ambulance up to the first floor of a building via a staircase, loading a patient on to the stretcher, and using the stretcher to transport the patient back to the ambulance. The subjective Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) survey (Borg scale) was used to measure perceived exertion at predefined intervals during transport.

RESULTS: No significant differences in workload were seen between stretcher groups A and B regarding unloading the stretcher (7.4 vs 8.2 p=0.3), transporting up a stairway (13.7 vs 12.5 p=0.06), lateral lift (12.1 vs 11.2 p=0.5), or flat ground transportation (10.4 vs 11.1 p=0.13). Pairs using stretcher A showed significantly less workload with regards to transporting down a stairway (11.0 vs 14.5 p<0.001) and loading into ambulance (11.1 vs 13.0 p<0.001).

CONCLUSION: A structured methodology may be used for testing the exertion levels experienced while using different stretcher systems. The use of supporting stretcher system mechanisms may reduce perceived exertion in EMS personnel mainly during transports down stairs and during loading into ambulance vehicles.

Keywords
Borg-scale, EMS, Stretcher, Workload
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13801 (URN)10.1016/j.ajem.2018.02.023 (DOI)000434468500026 ()29510910 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042634286 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-09 Created: 2018-03-09 Last updated: 2018-12-21Bibliographically approved
Hansson, P.-O., Andersson Hagiwara, M., Brink, P., Herlitz, J. & Wireklint Sundström, B. (2018). Prehospital identification of factors associated with death during one-year follow-up after acute stroke.. Brain and Behavior, Article ID e00987.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prehospital identification of factors associated with death during one-year follow-up after acute stroke.
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2018 (English)In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, article id e00987Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: In acute stroke, the risk of death and neurological sequelae are obvious threats. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between various clinical factors identified by the emergency medical service (EMS) system before arriving at hospital and the risk of death during the subsequent year among patients with a confirmed stroke.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: All patients with a diagnosis of stroke as the primary diagnosis admitted to a hospital in western Sweden (1.6 million inhabitants) during a four-month period were included. There were no exclusion criteria.

RESULTS: In all, 1,028 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of stroke who used the EMS were included in the analyses. Among these patients, 360 (35%) died during the following year. Factors that were independently associated with an increased risk of death were as follows: (1) high age, per year OR 1.07; 95% CI 1.05-1.09; (2) a history of heart failure, OR 2.08; 95% CI 1.26-3.42; (3) an oxygen saturation of <90%, OR 8.05; 95% CI 3.33-22.64; and (4) a decreased level of consciousness, OR 2.19; 95% CI 1.61-3.03.

CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with a stroke, four factors identified before arrival at hospital were associated with a risk of death during the following year. They were reflected in the patients' age, previous clinical history, respiratory function, and the function of the central nervous system.

Keywords
acute stroke, early chain, mortality, one-year follow-up
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14200 (URN)10.1002/brb3.987 (DOI)000434409200019 ()29770601 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047512969 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2018-08-17Bibliographically approved
Andersson, E., Bohlin, L., Herlitz, J., Sundler, A. J., Fekete, Z. & Andersson Hagiwara, M. (2018). Prehospital Identification of Patients with a Final Hospital Diagnosis of Stroke.. Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, 1-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prehospital Identification of Patients with a Final Hospital Diagnosis of Stroke.
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2018 (English)In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, E-ISSN 1945-1938, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Introduction the early phase of stroke, minutes are critical. Since the majority of patients with stroke are transported by the Emergency Medical Service (EMS), the early handling and decision making by the EMS clinician is important. Problem The study aim was to evaluate the frequency of a documented suspicion of stroke by the EMS nurse, and to investigate differences in the clinical signs of stroke and clinical assessment in the prehospital setting among patients with regard to if there was a documented suspicion of stroke on EMS arrival or not, in patients with a final hospital diagnosis of stroke.

METHODS: The study had a retrospective observational design. Data were collected from reports on patients who were transported by the EMS and had a final diagnosis of stroke at a single hospital in western Sweden (630 beds) in 2015. The data sources were hospital and prehospital medical journals.

RESULTS: In total, 454 patients were included. Among them, the EMS clinician suspected stroke in 52%. The findings and documentation on patients with a suspected stroke differed from the remaining patients as follows: a) More frequently documented symptoms from the face, legs/arms, and speech; b) More frequently assessments of neurology, face, arms/legs, speech, and eyes; c) More frequently addressed the major complaint with regard to time and place of onset, duration, localization, and radiation; d) Less frequently documented symptoms of headache, vertigo, and nausea; and e) More frequently had an electrocardiogram (ECG) recorded and plasma glucose sampled. In addition to the 52% of patients who had a documented initial suspicion of stroke, seven percent of the patients had an initial suspicion of transitory ischemic attack (TIA) by the EMS clinician, and a neurologist was approached in another 10%.

CONCLUSION: Among 454 patients with a final diagnosis of stroke who were transported by the EMS, an initial suspicion of stroke was not documented in one-half of the cases. These patients differed from those in whom a suspicion of stroke was documented in terms of limited clinical signs of stroke, a less extensive clinical assessment, and fewer clinical investigations. Andersson E , Bohlin L , Herlitz J , Sundler AJ , Fekete Z , Andersson Hagiwara M . Prehospital identification of patients with a final hospital diagnosis of stroke.

Keywords
CT computer tomography, ECG electrocardiogram, EMS Emergency Medical Service, ESS emergency signs and symptoms, TIA transitory ischemic attack, rt-PA recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, EMS, assessment, prehospital, stroke
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13413 (URN)10.1017/S1049023X17007178 (DOI)000428764900011 ()29317012 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044339157 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
Andersson, H., Gabre, M., Dehre, A., Andersson Hagiwara, M. & Maurin Söderholm, H. (2018). Simulation in Virtual World to Promote Communication. In: Pre-hospital care- Education and training of ambulance professionals: . Paper presented at 3rd Global Conference on Emergency Nursing and Trauma Care, Leeuwenhorst, 4-6 October, 2018.. Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulation in Virtual World to Promote Communication
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2018 (English)In: Pre-hospital care- Education and training of ambulance professionals, Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands, 2018Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction

Communication between ambulance professionals and patients is essential for understanding the patient's lifeworld (Wireklint Sundström & Dahlberg 2010). Simultaneously, communication is challenging to teach and learn within the framework of specific courses. However, simulation in virtual worlds can support the development of new skills such as communication (Combs, Sokolowski & Banks 2016).

 

Aim

The aim of this work was to design a simulation-based platform for communication training among ambulance nurse students (ANS).

 

Methods

A qualitative action research approach was used (Coghlan & Casey 2001). Second Life® (SL) was selected since it was an existing virtual world. SL is a web-based flexible three-dimensional platform that allows customization. Interaction and communication with other virtual people can be done through avatars in real time (Hodge, Collins & Giordano 2011). Three ANS and five teachers participated, none of the participants had prior experience of SL. Observations and interviews were used as data and analysed using thematic analysis.

 

Results

The participants’ experiences generated three themes:

 

Understanding the virtual world

It was easy to interact and communicate with other virtual people. However, it took time to feel comfortable to navigate in SL.

 

Technological challenges

One challenge was related to audio-visual problems e.g. not compatible headset, interfering echoes and that the image was distorted at times, which made it difficult to act and move the avatar. Another challenge was associated with the 3D modelling e.g. the capability to use of coordinates, positioning, object dimensioning and the fact that accidental deletions could not be restored. A third challenges that influenced the communication was the difficulty of visualizing clinically relevant care measures such as diagnostic examinations or drug treatment. Finally, there was a challenge to customize the avatars to look like ambulance professionals or a severely ill patient.

 

Learning through avatars

Learning through avatars requires that the participants take responsibility for delivering a convincing performance.  Immersion was limited since actions do not take place from a first-person viewpoint. There is a need that the scenario is based on realistic conditions e.g. interiors, equipment, clothing, avatar appearance and behaviour.

 

Conclusion

The present system is not suitable for training of medical assessment. Teachers who are considering using virtual worlds in the training for future ambulance professionals should note that an appropriate design is crucial for how the simulation is experienced.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands: , 2018
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15170 (URN)
Conference
3rd Global Conference on Emergency Nursing and Trauma Care, Leeuwenhorst, 4-6 October, 2018.
Available from: 2018-10-07 Created: 2018-10-07 Last updated: 2018-10-09Bibliographically approved
Andersson, H., Gabre, M., Dehre, A., Andersson Hagiwara, M. & Maurin Söderholm, H. (2018). Simulation in Virtual World to Promote Communication. In: Pre-hospital care- Education and training of ambulance professionals: . Paper presented at 3rd Global Conference on Emergency Nursing and Trauma Care, Leeuwenhorst, 4-6 October 2018. Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulation in Virtual World to Promote Communication
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Pre-hospital care- Education and training of ambulance professionals, Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands, 2018Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction

Communication between ambulance professionals and patients is essential for understanding the patient's lifeworld (Wireklint Sundström & Dahlberg 2010). Simultaneously, communication is challenging to teach and learn within the framework of specific courses. However, simulation in virtual worlds can support the development of new skills such as communication (Combs, Sokolowski & Banks 2016).

 

Aim

The aim of this work was to design a simulation-based platform for communication training among ambulance nurse students (ANS).

 

Methods

A qualitative action research approach was used (Coghlan & Casey 2001). Second Life® (SL) was selected since it was an existing virtual world. SL is a web-based flexible three-dimensional platform that allows customization. Interaction and communication with other virtual people can be done through avatars in real time (Hodge, Collins & Giordano 2011). Three ANS and five teachers participated, none of the participants had prior experience of SL. Observations and interviews were used as data and analysed using thematic analysis.

 

Results

The participants’ experiences generated three themes:

 

Understanding the virtual world

It was easy to interact and communicate with other virtual people. However, it took time to feel comfortable to navigate in SL.

 

Technological challenges

One challenge was related to audio-visual problems e.g. not compatible headset, interfering echoes and that the image was distorted at times, which made it difficult to act and move the avatar. Another challenge was associated with the 3D modelling e.g. the capability to use of coordinates, positioning, object dimensioning and the fact that accidental deletions could not be restored. A third challenges that influenced the communication was the difficulty of visualizing clinically relevant care measures such as diagnostic examinations or drug treatment. Finally, there was a challenge to customize the avatars to look like ambulance professionals or a severely ill patient.

 

Learning through avatars

Learning through avatars requires that the participants take responsibility for delivering a convincing performance.  Immersion was limited since actions do not take place from a first-person viewpoint. There is a need that the scenario is based on realistic conditions e.g. interiors, equipment, clothing, avatar appearance and behaviour.

 

Conclusion

The present system is not suitable for training of medical assessment. Teachers who are considering using virtual worlds in the training for future ambulance professionals should note that an appropriate design is crucial for how the simulation is experienced.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands: , 2018
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15171 (URN)
Conference
3rd Global Conference on Emergency Nursing and Trauma Care, Leeuwenhorst, 4-6 October 2018
Available from: 2018-10-07 Created: 2018-10-07 Last updated: 2018-10-17Bibliographically approved
Höglund, E., Schröder, A., Möller, M., Andersson Hagiwara, M. & Ohlsson-Nevo, E. (2018). The ambulance nurse experiences of non-conveying patients.. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 1(10)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ambulance nurse experiences of non-conveying patients.
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 1, no 10Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore ambulance nurses' (ANs) experiences of non-conveying patients to alternate levels of care.

BACKGROUND: Increases in ambulance utilisation and in the number of patients seeking ambulance care who do not require medical supervision or treatment during transport have led to increased nonconveyance (NC) and referral to other levels of care.

DESIGN: A qualitative interview study was conducted using an inductive research approach.

METHODS: The study was conducted in a region in the middle of Sweden during 2016-2017. Twenty nurses were recruited from the ambulance departments in the region. A conventional content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The study followed the COREQ checklist.

RESULTS: The ANs experienced NC as a complex and difficult task that carried a large amount of responsibility. They wanted to be professional, spend time with the patient and find the best solution for him or her. These needs conflicted with the ANs' desire to be available for assignments with a higher priority. The ANs could feel frustrated when they perceived that ambulance resources were being misused and when it was difficult to follow the NC guidelines.

CONCLUSION: If ANs are expected to nonconvey patients seeking ambulance care, they need a formal mandate, knowledge and access to primary health care.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: This study provides new knowledge regarding the work situation of ANs in relation to NC. These findings can guide future research and can be used by policymakers and ambulance organisations to highlight areas that need to evolve to improve patient care.

Keywords
ambulance nursing, care pathways, clinical decision-making, content analysis, experiences, health services research, nurse, qualitative study, refusal of care, self-care
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14992 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14626 (DOI)30016570 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85052619602 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
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