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Kumar Ramamoorthy, Sunil
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Publications (10 of 32) Show all publications
Kumar Ramamoorthy, S., Åkesson, D., Skrifvars, M., Rajan, R. & Periyasamy, A. P. (2019). Mechanical performance of biofibers and their corresponding composites. In: Mohammad Jawaid, Mohamed Thariq, Naheed Saba (Ed.), Mechanical and Physical Testing of Biocomposites, Fibre-Reinforced Composites and Hybrid Composites: . Woodhead Publishing Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mechanical performance of biofibers and their corresponding composites
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2019 (English)In: Mechanical and Physical Testing of Biocomposites, Fibre-Reinforced Composites and Hybrid Composites / [ed] Mohammad Jawaid, Mohamed Thariq, Naheed Saba, Woodhead Publishing Limited, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter focuses on mechanical performance of biofibers such as flax, hemp, and sisal and their effect on mechanical performance when they are reinforced in thermoset and thermoplastic polymers. The aim of this chapter is to present an overview of the mechanical characterization of the biofibers and their corresponding composites. The mechanical characterization includes tensile, flexural, impact, compressive, shear, toughness, hardness, brittleness, ductility, creep, fatigue, and dynamic mechanical analyses. Detailed studies of each test have been widely reported and an overview is important to relate the studies. Studies pertaining to the topics are cited. The most common materials used in biocomposites are biofibers (also called natural fibers) and petroleum-based polymers such polypropylene. The use of renewable materials in biocomposites has increased in the past couple of decades owing to extensive research on cellulosic fibers and biopolymers based on starch or vegetable oil. Today, research is focused on reinforcing natural fibers in petroleum-based polymers. However, the emphasis is shifting toward the amount of renewable materials in biocomposites, which has led to the use of biopolymers instead of petroleum-based polymers in composites. The mechanical properties of some renewable resource-based composites are comparable to commercially available nonrenewable composites.

Several plant biofibers have been reinforced in thermoplastics or thermosets to manufacture biocomposites because of their specific properties. The Young's modulus of commonly used biofibers such as hemp and flax could be over 50 GPa and therefore they could be good alternatives to glass fibers in several applications. The good mechanical properties of these biofibers influence the composites' mechanical performance when reinforced in polymers. It is important to understand the mechanical performance of these biofibers and biocomposites in a working environment. A detailed discussion about the mechanical performance of commonly used biofibers and composites is provided in this chapter.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Woodhead Publishing Limited, 2019
Keywords
Biocomposite, Biofiber, Mechanical properties, Natural fiber, Renewable materials
National Category
Polymer Technologies Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials Other Mechanical Engineering
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15228 (URN)10.1016/B978-0-08-102292-4.00014-X (DOI)
Available from: 2018-10-22 Created: 2018-10-22 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Kumar Ramamoorthy, S., Kuzhanthaivelu, G., Bohlén, M. & Åkesson, D. (2019). Waste Management Option for Bioplastics Alongside Conventional Plastics. In: IRC 2019 International Research Conference Proceedings: . Paper presented at ICWMRE 2019: International Conference on Waste Management, Recycling and Environment, Barcelona, Spain February 11 - 12, 2019..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Waste Management Option for Bioplastics Alongside Conventional Plastics
2019 (English)In: IRC 2019 International Research Conference Proceedings, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Bioplastics can be defined as polymers derived partly or completely from biomass. Bioplastics can be biodegradable such as polylactic acid (PLA) and polyhydroxyalkonoates (PHA); or non-biodegradable (biobased polyethylene (bio-PE), polypropylene (bio-PP), polyethylene terephthalate (bio-PET)). The usage of such bioplastics is expected to increase in the future due to new found interest in sustainable materials. At the same time, these plastics become a new type of waste in the recycling stream. Most countries do not have separate bioplastics collection for it to be recycled or composted. After a brief introduction of bioplastics such as PLA in UK, these plastics are once again replaced by conventional plastics by many establishments due to lack of commercial composting. Recycling companies fear the contamination of conventional plastic in the recycling stream and they said they would have to invest in expensive new equipment to separate bioplastics and recycle it separately. Bioplastics are seen as a threat to the recycling industry as bioplastics may degrade during the mechanical recycling process and the properties of the recycled plastics are seriously impacted. This project studies what happens when bioplastics contaminate conventional plastics.

Three commonly used conventional plastics were selected for this study: polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). In order to simulate contamination, two biopolymers, either polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) or thermoplastic starch (TPS) were blended with the conventional polymers. The amount of bioplastics in conventional plastics was either 1% or 5%. The blended plastics were processed again to see the effect of degradation. Mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of these plastics were characterized.

 

The results from contamination showed that the tensile strength and the modulus of PE was almost unaffected whereas the elongation is clearly reduced indicating the increase in brittleness of the plastic. Generally, it can be said that PP is slightly more sensitive to the contamination than PE. This can be explained by the fact that the melting point of PP is higher than for PE and as a consequence, the biopolymer will degrade more quickly. However, the reduction of the tensile properties for PP is relatively modest. It is also important to notice that when plastics are recovered, there will always be a contamination that will reduce the material properties. The reduction of the tensile properties is not necessary larger than if a non-biodegradable polymer would have contaminated PE or PP. The Charpy impact strength is generally a more sensitive test method towards contamination. Again, PE is relatively unaffected by the contamination but for PP there is a relatively large reduction of the impact properties already at 1% contamination.

PET is polyester and it is by its very nature more sensitive to degradation than PE and PP. PET also have a much higher melting point than PE and PP and as a consequence the biopolymer will quickly degrade at the processing temperature of PET. As for the tensile strength, PET can tolerate 1% contamination without any reduction of the tensile strength. However, when the impact strength is examined, it is clear that already at 1% contamination, there is a strong reduction of the properties. It can also be seen that presence of TPS is more detrimental to PET than PHA is. This can be explained by the fact that TPS contain reactive hydroxyl groups that can react with the ester bond of PET. This will in other words lead to degradation of PET.

The thermal properties show the change in the crystallinity. As a general conclusion, it can be said that the plastics become less crystalline when contaminated. The blends were also characterized by SEM. Biphasic morphology can be seen as the two polymers are not truly blendable which also contributes to reduced mechanical properties. Recycling of the contaminated polymer shows an increase in crystallinity. This means that when the polymers are processed, polymer degradation occur causing the polymer chains to gradually become shorter which will enhance the crystallization process.

The study shows that PE is relatively robust againt contamination, while polypropylene (PP) is somewhat more sensitive and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) can be quite sensitive towards contamination.

Keywords
Bioplastics, contamination, recycling, waste management
National Category
Polymer Technologies Composite Science and Engineering Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-16032 (URN)
Conference
ICWMRE 2019: International Conference on Waste Management, Recycling and Environment, Barcelona, Spain February 11 - 12, 2019.
Available from: 2019-04-25 Created: 2019-04-25 Last updated: 2019-04-29Bibliographically approved
Kumar Ramamoorthy, S., Periyasamy, A. P. & Lavate, S. S. (2018). Eco-friendly Denim Processing. In: Leticia Myriam Torres Martínez (Ed.), Handbook of Ecomaterials: . Springer Publishing Company
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eco-friendly Denim Processing
2018 (English)In: Handbook of Ecomaterials / [ed] Leticia Myriam Torres Martínez, Springer Publishing Company, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The denim sector is booming worldwide, because of the spread of denim culture. All over the world it has brought with it a trend of fast-changing fashion. Denim washing has emerged as one of the important production routes toward meeting the fast-changing demands of the fashion market. There are huge ecological concerns, as this sector is enormous. Approximately 1500 gallons of water is needed to produce 1.5 pounds of cotton to make one pair of jeans. If this continues, soon it will pose a serious problem to drinking water supplies. It is therefore important to study the environmental impact of denim and find alternative processes. This chapter starts by describing the different types of denim washing techniques. In addition, it discusses the environmental impact of denim dry and wet washing techniques, and the importance of environmentally friendly washing techniques. It also describes the latest denim finishing technologies, comparing their impacts on the environment with those of the classic techniques. Further, the environmental aspects of auxiliaries and washing chemicals are reviewed, followed by a discussion of garment washing and finishing processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Publishing Company, 2018
Keywords
Denim, environmental impact, laser fading, ozone fading, sustainability, textiles, washing, washing auxiliaries
National Category
Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General); Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15226 (URN)978-3-319-48281-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-10-22 Created: 2018-10-22 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Kumar Ramamoorthy, S., Skrifvars, M., Rajan, R., Rainosalo, E., Thomas, S., Zavasnik, J. & Vuorinen, J. (2018). Mechanical, thermal, and burning properties of viscose fabric composites: Influence of epoxy resin modification. Journal of Applied Polymer Science, 135(36)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mechanical, thermal, and burning properties of viscose fabric composites: Influence of epoxy resin modification
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 135, no 36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The influence of epoxy resin modification by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) on various properties of warp knitted viscose fabric is reported in this study. Dynamic mechanical, impact resistance, flexural, thermal properties, and burning behavior of the epoxy/viscose fabric composites are studied with respect to varying content of silane coupling agent. The results obtained forAPTES-modified epoxy resin based composites reinforced with unmodified viscose fabric composites are compared to unmodified epoxy resin based composites reinforced with APTES-modified viscose fabric. The dynamic mechanical behavior of the APTES-modified resin based composites indicates improved interfacial adhesion. The composites prepared from modified epoxy resin exhibited a twofold increase in impact resistance. The improved adhesion between the fiber and modified resin was also visible from the scanning electron microscope analysis of the impact fracture surface. There was less influence of resin modification on the flexural properties of the composites. The 5% APTES modification induced early degradation of composites compared to all other compo-sites. The burning rate of all the composites under study is rated to be satisfactory for use in automotive interior applications.

Keywords
cellulose and other wood products, functionalization of polymers, mechanical properties, thermal properties, thermosets
National Category
Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials Polymer Technologies
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15227 (URN)10.1002/app.46673 (DOI)000436542700011 ()2-s2.0-85049105961 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-22 Created: 2018-10-22 Last updated: 2018-11-30Bibliographically approved
Rajan, R., Rainosalo, E., Thomas, S., Kumar Ramamoorthy, S., Vuorinen, J., Skrifvars, M. & Zavasnik, J. (2018). Modification of epoxy resin by silane-coupling agent to improve tensile properties of viscose fabric composites. Polymer Bulletin, 75(1), 167-195
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modification of epoxy resin by silane-coupling agent to improve tensile properties of viscose fabric composites
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2018 (English)In: Polymer Bulletin, ISSN 0170-0839, E-ISSN 1436-2449, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 167-195Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The modification of epoxy resin by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) to improve the tensile properties of warp knitted viscose fabric composites is reported in this study. The study evaluates the efficiency of modification methods adopted to modify the epoxy resin and the influence of the resin modification on various properties of the cured castings. The influence of matrix resin modification on the tensile properties of viscose fabric composite is compared to those prepared from chemically modified fibre. The efficiency of the modification was determined through titration method to determine the epoxide content of epoxy resin, viscosity measurement and FTIR. The effect of APTES modification on various properties of cured castings is studied through differential scanning calorimeter, contact angle measurement and tensile testing. The addition of APTES into the epoxy resin decreased the epoxide content in the resin as evident from the titration method. The tensile strength of cured castings decreased after the resin modification. The tensile strength and elongation at break of the viscose fabric composites prepared from modified resin, increased up to 14 and 41%, respectively. The improved adhesion of APTES-modified epoxy resin to the viscose fibre is confirmed from SEM analysis of tensile fracture surface.

Keywords
APTES, Composites, Epoxy, Modification, Regenerated cellulose, Silane coupling agent, Tensile, Viscose
National Category
Composite Science and Engineering
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13449 (URN)10.1007/s00289-017-2022-2 (DOI)000419586800012 ()2-s2.0-85018515485 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-14 Created: 2018-01-14 Last updated: 2018-12-01Bibliographically approved
Kumar Ramamoorthy, S., Periyasamy, A. P., Rwawiire, S. & Zhao, Y. (2018). Sustainable Wastewater Treatment Methods for Textile Industry. In: Subramanian Senthilkannan Muthu (Ed.), Sustainable Innovations in Apparel Production: . Singapore: Springer Publishing Company
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable Wastewater Treatment Methods for Textile Industry
2018 (English)In: Sustainable Innovations in Apparel Production / [ed] Subramanian Senthilkannan Muthu, Singapore: Springer Publishing Company, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

All over the world, environmental considerations are now becoming vital factors during the selection of consumer goods which include textiles. According to the World Bank, 20% of water pollution globally is caused by textile processing, which means that these industries produce vast amounts of wastewater. Generally, these effluents contain high levels of suspended solids (SS), phosphates, dyes, salts, organo-pesticides, non-biodegradable organics, and heavy metals. Increase in water scarcity and environmental regulations has led to textile industries to seek for sustainable wastewater treatment methods which help to reduce their water footprint as well as reduce their operational costs. Therefore, sustainable wastewater treatment could be the best choice for the textile industries with respect to the current issues. So, it is important to discuss and champion awareness mechanisms which help to reduce the current issues with respect to the textile wastewater. Therefore, this chapter intends to discuss the various sustainable wastewater treatments, namely granular activated carbon (GAC), electrocoagulation (EC), ultrasonic treatment, an advanced oxidation process (AOP), ozonation, membrane biological reactor (MBR), and sequencing batch reactor (SBR).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Singapore: Springer Publishing Company, 2018
Keywords
wastewater, effluent, textile industry, electrocoagulation, water pollution, membrane bioreactor, ultrafiltration, activated carbon, sustainability
National Category
Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Resource Recovery; Textiles and Fashion (General)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15225 (URN)10.1007/978-981-10-8591-8 (DOI)978-981-10-8590-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-10-22 Created: 2018-10-22 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Kumar Ramamoorthy, S., Skrifvars, M., Alagar, R. & Akhtar, N. (2017). End of life textiles as reinforcements in biocomposites. Journal of polymers and the environment
Open this publication in new window or tab >>End of life textiles as reinforcements in biocomposites
2017 (English)In: Journal of polymers and the environment, ISSN 1566-2543, E-ISSN 1572-8919, p. -12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A number of attempts have been made to recycle cotton/polyester blend woven fabrics after use; however, most of these fabrics are disposed of in landfills. Major part of these blend fabrics are not recycled due to complexity of the fibre arrangement and cannot be separated economically. This study shows that these discarded woven fabrics could be directly used as reinforcements in composites without fibre separation. Uniform alignment in the woven fabric provided consistent properties to the composites. The fabrics were reinforced by soybean-based-bioresins to produce biocomposites. The composites were analysed for mechanical, thermal, viscoelastic and morphological properties. Porosity and wettability of the composites were also evaluated. Results demonstrate that the tensile strength and modulus of over 100 and 10 MPa, respectively, can be obtained without any fibre treatment. Furthermore, impact strength over 70 kJ/m2 was obtained without any chemical treatment on fibres. The porosity of the composites produced was less than 9 vol%. Additionally, the fabrics were treated with alkali in order to improve the fibre–matrix interface and the composite properties were studied. From the economical perspective, these composites can be produced at a low cost as the major component is available for free or low cost.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Contact angle, Mechanical properties, Porosity, Reuse, Textile composites
National Category
Composite Science and Engineering
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13448 (URN)10.1007/s10924-017-0965-x (DOI)000425964600008 ()2-s2.0-85013858809 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-14 Created: 2018-01-14 Last updated: 2018-11-29Bibliographically approved
Ramamoorthy, S. K., Åkesson, D., Skrifvars, M. & Baghaei, B. (2017). Preparation and Characterization of Biobased Thermoset Polymers from Renewable Resources and Their Use in Composites. In: Vijay Kumar Thakur, Manju Kumari Thakur, Michael R. Kessler (Ed.), Handbook of Composites from Renewable Materials, Physico-Chemical and Mechanical Characterization: (pp. 425-457). Hoboken, New Jersey, USA: John Wiley & Sons
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preparation and Characterization of Biobased Thermoset Polymers from Renewable Resources and Their Use in Composites
2017 (English)In: Handbook of Composites from Renewable Materials, Physico-Chemical and Mechanical Characterization / [ed] Vijay Kumar Thakur, Manju Kumari Thakur, Michael R. Kessler, Hoboken, New Jersey, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2017, p. 425-457Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter focuses on physicochemical and mechanical characterization of compositesmade from renewable materials. Most common renewable materials used in composites arenatural fibers and polymers based on starch or vegetable oil. The extent of using renewablematerials in biocomposites has increased during the past decade due to extensive research oncellulosic fibers and biobased polymers. Earlier, the research was focused on using the naturalfibers as reinforcement in crude oil-based polymers such as polypropylene. Later, the emphasisshifted to increase the amount of renewable components in the biocomposites which led tothe introductionof biobased resins in the composites. The properties of some biocompositesare today comparable to the properties for commercially available nonrenewable composites.Several plant biofibers have been used as reinforcement in biobased thermoplastics or thermosetsto manufacture biocomposites. Material characterization is important to understand theperformance of these composites under specific environment. Detailed discussion about themechanical and physicochemical characterization is provided in this chapter. Physicochemicalcharacterization includes chemical composition, density, viscosity, molecular weight, meltingtemperature, crystallinity,morphology, wettability, surface tension, water binding capacity,electricalconductivity, flammability, thermal stability, and swelling. Mechanical characterizationincludes tensile, flexural, impact, compressive, shear, toughness, hardness, brittleness, ductility,creep, fatigue, and dynamic mechanical analysis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, New Jersey, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
Renewable materials, physicochemical properties, mechanical properties, biocomposites, biopolymers, natural fiber
National Category
Engineering and Technology Environmental Engineering Polymer Technologies
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-11889 (URN)2-s2.0-85050924637 (Scopus ID)978-1-119-22366-5 (ISBN)9781119224235 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-02-03 Created: 2017-02-03 Last updated: 2018-12-01Bibliographically approved
Ramamoorthy, S. K. & Skrifvars, M. (2016). BIOCOMPOSITES FROM SURFACE MODIFIED REGENERATED CELLULOSE FIBERS AND LACTIC ACID THERMOSET BIORESIN. In: : . Paper presented at 14th International Symposium on Bioplastics, Guelph, May 31-June 3, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>BIOCOMPOSITES FROM SURFACE MODIFIED REGENERATED CELLULOSE FIBERS AND LACTIC ACID THERMOSET BIORESIN
2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Abstract:

Thermoset bioresin was synthesized from lactic acid and glycerol, and the resin was characterized for it to be used in composite applications. On the other hand, regenerated cellulose fibers were surface treated to improve the physico–chemical interactions at the fiber–matrix interface. The effect of surface treatments, silane and alkali, on regenerated cellulose fibers was studied by using the treated fibers as reinforcement in lactic acid thermoset bioresin. Mechanical tests were used as indicator of the improvement of the interfacial strength. Fiber surface treatments and the effect on adhesion to the matrix were characterized using microscopy images and thermal conductivity. Mechanical properties of the composites showed an increase when treated with silane as the bi-functional silane molecule acts as link between the regenerated cellulose fiber and the bioresin.

Porosity volume decreased significantly on silane treatment due to improved interface and interlocking between fiber and matrix. Decrease in water absorption and increase in contact angle confirmed the change in the hydrophilicity of the composites. The storage modulus increased when the reinforcements were treated with silane whereas the damping intensity decreased for the same composites indicating a better adhesion between fiber and matrix on silane treatment. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that the thermal stability of the reinforcement altered after treatments. The resin curing was followed using differential scanning calorimetry and the necessity for post-curing was recommended. Finite element analysis was used to predict the thermal behavior of the composites and a non-destructive resonance analysis was performed to ratify the modulus obtained from tensile testing. The changes were also seen on composites reinforced with alkali treated fiber. Microscopy images confirmed the good adhesion between the silane treated fibers and the resin at the interface.

Keywords
Cellulose Fibers, Thermoset Resin, Surface Treatment, Biocomposites, Properties
National Category
Composite Science and Engineering
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-11838 (URN)
Conference
14th International Symposium on Bioplastics, Guelph, May 31-June 3, 2016
Available from: 2017-01-20 Created: 2017-01-20 Last updated: 2017-03-01Bibliographically approved
Persson, N.-K., Baghaei, B., Bashir, T., Brorström, B., Hedegård, L., Carlson Ingdahl, T., . . . Åkesson, D. (2016). Re: en ny samhällssektor spirar. Borås: Högskolan i Borås
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Re: en ny samhällssektor spirar
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2016 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Resurser och hållbarhet är nära förknippade. Hållbarhet innebär att hushålla med resurser - materiella, miljömässiga och mänskliga. Och hushållning är per definition kärnan i ekonomi. Man börjar alltmer se framväxten av en hel arsenal av verktyg och förhållnings- och angreppssätt för att bygga hållbarhet. Detta förenas av ett synsätt att det som hitintills setts  om avfall och värdelöst, och rent utav besvärligt att ta hand om, nu blir en värdefull resurs. Det glömda och gömda kommer åter. Faktum är att många ord och begrepp kring detta börjar på just åter- eller re- . Internationellt talar man om Redesign, Recycling, Remake, Recycle, Recraft, Reuse, Recreate, Reclaim, Reduce, Repair, Refashion.

Vad är då allt detta? Ja, vill man dra det långt, är det inte mindre än framväxten av ett nyvunnet sätt att tänka, ja av en ny samhällssektor, en bransch och en industri,  sammanbundet av filosofin att återanvändningen, spillminskningen, vidarebruket, efterlivet anses som viktiga faktorer för ett miljömedvetet samhälle. Re: blir paraplytermen för detta. I denna antologi av forskare från skilda discipliner vid Högskolan i Borås lyfts ett antal av dessa begrepp inom Re: fram.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Borås: Högskolan i Borås, 2016. p. 80
Series
Vetenskap för profession: rapport, ISSN 1654-6520 ; 37
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-10004 (URN)978-91-88269-22-5 (ISBN)978-91-88269-23-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-06-09 Created: 2016-06-09 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
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