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Francke, H. & Sundin, O. (2019). Källkritik och nya publiceringsformer. Stockholm
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Källkritik och nya publiceringsformer
2019 (Swedish)Other (Refereed)
Abstract [sv]

Internet med dess många publiceringsformer har inneburit en renässans för intresset för källkritik. När vem som helst kan publicera information om i det närmaste vad som helst blir tillvägagångssätt för att kunna värdera hur trovärdig en källa är av stor vikt. I många av dessa publiceringsformer finns det ingen förhandsgranskning av texter och ansvaret för att granska faller på läsaren. Det kan uttryckas som att vi i samband med många av nätets publiceringsformer går från förhandsgranskning till efterhandsgranskning av texter. I Del 4 av denna modul resonerar vi om konsekvenserna av dessa, och andra, förändringar för källkritik. Vi utgår från konkreta exempel men kan givetvis inte täcka in alla olika publiceringsformer. Vi tar utgångspunkt i frågor om vad författarskap innebär i nya medieformat och hur man kan arbeta med källkritiska problemställningar när författarskapet inte alltid är tydligt.

Place, publisher, year, pages
Stockholm: , 2019. p. 14
Series
Lärportalen: Kritisk användning av nätet
Keywords
källkritik, sociala medier, informationssökning, informationskompetens, auktoritet, trovärdighet
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21753 (URN)
Available from: 2019-09-21 Created: 2019-09-21 Last updated: 2019-09-23Bibliographically approved
Francke, H. & Johansson, M. (2019). Källkritik på internet. Stockholm: Skolverket
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Källkritik på internet
2019 (Swedish)Other (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, pages
Stockholm: Skolverket, 2019. p. 16
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21751 (URN)
Available from: 2019-09-20 Created: 2019-09-20 Last updated: 2019-09-23Bibliographically approved
Francke, H., Lenstra, N., Vårheim, A. & Skare, R. (2019). (Media and) Information Literacy in the Public Library: A review of the literature. In: : . Paper presented at UNESCO:s Global Media and Information Literacy Week 2019 Feature Conference, MIL Citizens: Informed, Engaged, Empowered, Gothenburg, September 24-26, 2019.. Unesco
Open this publication in new window or tab >>(Media and) Information Literacy in the Public Library: A review of the literature
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Unesco, 2019
Keywords
media and information literacy, digital literacy, public libraries, literature review, social inclusion
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21810 (URN)
Conference
UNESCO:s Global Media and Information Literacy Week 2019 Feature Conference, MIL Citizens: Informed, Engaged, Empowered, Gothenburg, September 24-26, 2019.
Projects
ALMPUB-TRG
Available from: 2019-10-07 Created: 2019-10-07 Last updated: 2019-10-08Bibliographically approved
Francke, H. (2019). The academic web profile as agenre of “self-making”. Online information review (Print), 43(5), 760-774
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The academic web profile as agenre of “self-making”
2019 (English)In: Online information review (Print), ISSN 1468-4527, E-ISSN 1468-4535, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 760-774Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – The activities of academic researchers are increasingly regulated by neo-liberal ideals, includingexpectations that researchers are visible online and actively promote their output. The purpose of this paper isto explore how researchers take on this responsibility. It uses the concepts of genre, authorship and self-writingin order to understand how the story of an academic life is constructed on academic web profiles.

Design/methodology/approach – A qualitative content analysis was conducted of material on 64 profilesbelonging to 20 researchers on institutional and personal websites, as well as on ResearchGate, Academica.edu and Google Scholar.

Findings – The study shows that while institutional websites primarily contain researcher-producedmaterial, content on commercial platforms is often co-constructed through distributed authorship by theresearcher, the platform and other platform users. Nine different ways in which the profile of an “academicself” may be said to highlight the particular strengths of a researcher are identified. These include bothmetrics-based strengths and qualitative forms of information about the academic life, such as experience, theimportance of their research and good teaching.

Social implications – This study of academic web profiles contributes to a better understanding of howresearchers self-govern the story of their academic self, or resist such governance, in online environments.

Originality/value – The study furthers the knowledge of how researchers make use of and respond todigital tools for online visibility opportunities and how the story of the “academic self” is “made” for suchpublic presentation.

Keywords
Researchers, Academic social network sites, Academic web profiles, Distributed authorship, Self-writing
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21752 (URN)10.1108/OIR-12-2017-0347 (DOI)000483618200005 ()2-s2.0-85063902392 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-20681-97949-46
Available from: 2019-09-21 Created: 2019-09-21 Last updated: 2019-09-25Bibliographically approved
Francke, H., Lindelöw, C. & Olsson, L. (2018). Author Perspectives on Research Visibility and Impact. In: Marco Schirone, Björn Hammarfelt & Gustaf Nelhans (Ed.), 23rd Nordic Workshop on Bibliometrics and Research Policy 2018: Book of abstracts. Paper presented at 23rd Nordic Workshop on Bibliometrics and Research Policy 2018, Borås, November 8-9 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Author Perspectives on Research Visibility and Impact
2018 (English)In: 23rd Nordic Workshop on Bibliometrics and Research Policy 2018: Book of abstracts / [ed] Marco Schirone, Björn Hammarfelt & Gustaf Nelhans, 2018Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The poster will present findings from a survey of 375 corresponding authors whose publications have beenpublished open access as part of the Springer Compact agreement between Bibsam and Springer Nature 2016-2018. In focus is how these authors reason about ways to make their research visible, how/if they themselves tryto track the attention gained by the publication, and what they think are good impact measures. The study thusadds to previous work on author attitudes and practices (e.g. Hammarfelt & Haddow, 2018; Tenopir et al., 2016)and can provide some input into the current work in Sweden on how to evaluate and assure high research quality(UKÄ, 2018).

When asked about their arguments for publishing open access, a large proportion of respondents in freetextanswers indicated that open access is important because it increases a publication’s visibility, access to it,downloads and/or social and scientific impact. Consequently, it is interesting to investigate if open accesspublishing is the only way in which these authors try to find readers for their publication, or if they take furthersteps. Answers suggest researchers use general social media, academic networking sites, and more traditionaldigital channels to share their publications.

Furthermore, the study asked which measures the authors think are the best ones for assessing the impactof their publications, and how they themselves find out how much attention their publications get. The responseswill be discussed in terms of traditional metrics, such as JIFs and citations, and altmetrics, such as how documentsare accessed or appraised (Haustein et al., 2016) through downloads or shares in social media. They will also berelated to more indirect forms of research evaluation, such as peer review and social impact.

References

Hammarfelt, B. & Haddow, G. (2018). Conflicting measures and values: How humanities scholars in Australia and Swedenuse and react to bibliometric indicators. JASIS&T, 69(7), 924-935.

Haustein, S., Bowman, T. D. & Costas, R. (2016). Interpreting ‘altmetrics’: Viewing acts on social media through the lensof citation and social theories. In Sugimoto, C. R. (Ed.), Theories of informetrics and scholarly communication (pp. 372-405). Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.

Tenopir, C. et al. (2016). No scholar is an island: The impact of sharing in the work life of scholars. Learned Publishing, 30,5-17.

UKÄ - Universitetskanslerämbetet (2018). Kvalitetssäkring av forskning: Rapportering av ett regeringsuppdrag. (Report2018:2) Stockholm: Universitetskanslerämbetet.

Keywords
authors, open access, impact measures, attention, scholarly publishing, researchvisibility
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15495 (URN)
Conference
23rd Nordic Workshop on Bibliometrics and Research Policy 2018, Borås, November 8-9 2018.
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Francke, H., Lenstra, N., Vårheim, A. & Skare, R. (2018). Digital Literacy and Social Inclusion in Public Libraries: A Review of Research. In: : . Paper presented at ECIL: European Conference on Information Literacy, Oulu, Finland, September 24-27, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital Literacy and Social Inclusion in Public Libraries: A Review of Research
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The practices through which people manage and enrich their everyday lives rely increasingly on their ability to make use of digital and informational resources. In policy texts, physical and intellectual access to digital information has been framed as a problem of social inclusion to which the public library may be part of the solution (Thompson et al., 2014). In library research, there is some evidence that public libraries contribute positively in strengthening social capital and participation in society among its patrons (Johnson, 2010; Vårheim, 2014; Vårheim, Steinmo & Ide, 2008).

The present study investigates how the work done by public libraries to support digital and information literacy and, thus, potentially digital and social inclusion, is portrayed in the literature.

The literature review was based on publications from 2010-2017 collected through structured searches in the databases Web of Science, Scopus, and LISA. The publications were coded through qualitative content analysis (Altheide & Schneider, 2013) starting in the following analytical questions:

  • which public library services or activities are described;
  • which groups of patrons are intended beneficiaries;
  • which methods and theoretical approaches were used;
  • what were the main findings of the study;
  • which aspects of digital and information literacies are emphasized; which kinds of knowledge, perceptions and attitudes are these literacies intended to support?

Many of the publications describe community projects in which public libraries play a leading role. Several studies address concepts such as digital inclusion and social capital, although few studies actually engage with them theoretically. The types of activities, outcomes, literacies, and beneficiaries vary greatly, but much work is focused on supporting literacies for active citizenship and employability.

This literature review is a building block in constructing a theoretical framework and a research design for empirical studies of the development of digital and information literacy activities in public libraries and the possible implications for physical and digital community participation.

References

Altheide, D. L., & Schneider, C. J. (2013). Qualitative media analysis (2nd ed.). Los Angeles, CA: SAGE.

Johnson, C. A. (2010). Do public libraries contribute to social capital? A preliminary investigation into the relationship. Library & Information Science Research, 32(2), 147–155.

Thompson, K. M. et al. (2014). Digital literacy and digital inclusion: Information policy and the public library. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.

Vårheim, A., Steinmo, S., & Ide, E. (2008). Do libraries matter? Public libraries and the creation of social capital. Journal of Documentation, 64(6), 877–892.

Vårheim, A. (2014). Trust in libraries and trust in most people: Social capital creation in the public library. The Library Quarterly, 84(3), 258–277.

Keywords
public libraries, social participation, social capital, digital literacy, digital resources
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15496 (URN)
Conference
ECIL: European Conference on Information Literacy, Oulu, Finland, September 24-27, 2018
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Olsson, L., Aldberg, H., Francke, H., Kronman, U. & Willén, N. (2018). Evaluation of Offset Agreements – Report 3: Springer Compact. Stockholm: Kungliga biblioteket
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of Offset Agreements – Report 3: Springer Compact
Show others...
2018 (English)Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Kungliga biblioteket, 2018. p. 17
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15502 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Olsson, L., Aldberg, H., Francke, H., Kronman, U., Lindelöw, C. & Willén, N. (2018). Evaluation of Offset Agreements – Report 4: Springer Compact. Stockholm: Kungliga biblioteket
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of Offset Agreements – Report 4: Springer Compact
Show others...
2018 (English)Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Kungliga biblioteket, 2018. p. 20
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15501 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Francke, H. (2018). Open Access Made Easy. In: : . Paper presented at NordILL 2018: The 13th Nordic Resource Sharing Reference and Collection Management Conference, Umeå, October 10-12, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Open Access Made Easy
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

Studies have shown a steady but slow uptake of open access to the scholarly literature over the past decade, with estimations that roughly 25 to 30 per cent of journal articles are available open access on publication. Funders and governments, especially in Europe, have taken various steps to support open access and to increase access to publications, including the recently announced cOAlition S, which is intended to significantly speed up the move towards full gold open access. As an interim solution, some consortia have signed offset agreements with publishers, for instance the Read & Publish agreement Springer Compact between Swedish Bibsam and Springer Nature (2016-2018). This talk will present findings from a survey with authors whose publications were covered through Springer Compact. What are their reactions to publishing open access in this way? What kind of support do they wish from their universities and libraries? What implications may their experiences, views and suggestions have for future initiatives and for library services?

Keywords
open access, offset agreements, authors
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15498 (URN)
Conference
NordILL 2018: The 13th Nordic Resource Sharing Reference and Collection Management Conference, Umeå, October 10-12, 2018
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Francke, H. (2018). Researcher attitudes to offset agreements for OA publishing. In: The 13th Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing 2018: . Paper presented at The 13th Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing 2018. UiT The Arctic University of Norway, November 28–29, 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Researcher attitudes to offset agreements for OA publishing
2018 (English)In: The 13th Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing 2018, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Swedish government has expressed an intention to move towards open access (OA) to publications based on publicly funded research in Sweden. As part of fulfilling this intention, the Bibsam Consortium, working on behalf of a number of Swedish universities, government agencies, and research institutes, has started to include OA in their negotiations with publishers. One consequence is that Bibsam has followed other international actors and entered into a number of offset agreements. The first of these agreements was Springer Compact, which runs from July 2016 to December 2018. The implementation and consequences of this agreement are being investigated at the request of Bibsam, and this presentation builds on findings from this investigation.

Offset agreements are presented as one possible road ahead, a temporary one, in the transition towards OA to scholarly publications. A number of factors, including costs and the speed of flipping hybrid journals to full OA, will determine the success of such agreements. The attitudes of the researchers – the authors of the publications – are also key in determining the outcome. This presentation reports on findings from a questionnaire submitted by 375 first authors of articles covered by the Swedish Springer Compact agreement. It will present the authors’ attitudes to OA, to the Springer Compact agreement, and to future similar agreements.

The study shows that only about one quarter of respondents knew about the agreement before submitting their work. A majority would not have paid article processing charges (APC) for their article had APCs not been covered by the agreement. Many are generally positive to OA publishing, however. When asked what they think about agreements such as Springer Compact, three quarters wrote in free-text answers that it is “good”, “very good” or “excellent”. Respondents express both appreciation of the easy process and a relief over not having to find funding for OA.

Some respondents were more tentative, saying that they appreciate OA, but that their opinion about the agreement depends on the cost. Non-profit solutions to academic publishing or alternative methods to achieving OA were also mentioned as desirable. A small number of respondents would prefer the traditional subscription model. Yet, the vast majority of respondents say they would like to see similar agreements with other publishers.

The answers to the questionnaire show that these researchers are very positive to having their work published OA if it is not associated with costs, limitations, or other hassles for the researcher. That is, if publishing remains no more problematic than in the subscription system, researchers see many benefits with OA. However, there is a minority which expresses ideological hesitation. From this, universities and funders can learn the value of facilitating OA publishing for the individual researcher, but also that many researchers will expect agreements to be economically feasible and that there is a potential to engaging researchers even more in the discussion of future solutions.

Keywords
offset agreements, authors, researchers, attitudes, open access
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15493 (URN)10.7557/5.4540 (DOI)
Conference
The 13th Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing 2018. UiT The Arctic University of Norway, November 28–29, 2018.
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5572-8566

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