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Publications (10 of 63) Show all publications
Francke, H., Lindelöw, C. & Olsson, L. (2018). Author Perspectives on Research Visibility and Impact. In: Marco Schirone, Björn Hammarfelt & Gustaf Nelhans (Ed.), 23rd Nordic Workshop on Bibliometrics and Research Policy 2018: Book of abstracts. Paper presented at 23rd Nordic Workshop on Bibliometrics and Research Policy 2018, Borås, November 8-9 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Author Perspectives on Research Visibility and Impact
2018 (English)In: 23rd Nordic Workshop on Bibliometrics and Research Policy 2018: Book of abstracts / [ed] Marco Schirone, Björn Hammarfelt & Gustaf Nelhans, 2018Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The poster will present findings from a survey of 375 corresponding authors whose publications have beenpublished open access as part of the Springer Compact agreement between Bibsam and Springer Nature 2016-2018. In focus is how these authors reason about ways to make their research visible, how/if they themselves tryto track the attention gained by the publication, and what they think are good impact measures. The study thusadds to previous work on author attitudes and practices (e.g. Hammarfelt & Haddow, 2018; Tenopir et al., 2016)and can provide some input into the current work in Sweden on how to evaluate and assure high research quality(UKÄ, 2018).

When asked about their arguments for publishing open access, a large proportion of respondents in freetextanswers indicated that open access is important because it increases a publication’s visibility, access to it,downloads and/or social and scientific impact. Consequently, it is interesting to investigate if open accesspublishing is the only way in which these authors try to find readers for their publication, or if they take furthersteps. Answers suggest researchers use general social media, academic networking sites, and more traditionaldigital channels to share their publications.

Furthermore, the study asked which measures the authors think are the best ones for assessing the impactof their publications, and how they themselves find out how much attention their publications get. The responseswill be discussed in terms of traditional metrics, such as JIFs and citations, and altmetrics, such as how documentsare accessed or appraised (Haustein et al., 2016) through downloads or shares in social media. They will also berelated to more indirect forms of research evaluation, such as peer review and social impact.

References

Hammarfelt, B. & Haddow, G. (2018). Conflicting measures and values: How humanities scholars in Australia and Swedenuse and react to bibliometric indicators. JASIS&T, 69(7), 924-935.

Haustein, S., Bowman, T. D. & Costas, R. (2016). Interpreting ‘altmetrics’: Viewing acts on social media through the lensof citation and social theories. In Sugimoto, C. R. (Ed.), Theories of informetrics and scholarly communication (pp. 372-405). Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.

Tenopir, C. et al. (2016). No scholar is an island: The impact of sharing in the work life of scholars. Learned Publishing, 30,5-17.

UKÄ - Universitetskanslerämbetet (2018). Kvalitetssäkring av forskning: Rapportering av ett regeringsuppdrag. (Report2018:2) Stockholm: Universitetskanslerämbetet.

Keywords
authors, open access, impact measures, attention, scholarly publishing, researchvisibility
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15495 (URN)
Conference
23rd Nordic Workshop on Bibliometrics and Research Policy 2018, Borås, November 8-9 2018.
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Francke, H., Lenstra, N., Vårheim, A. & Skare, R. (2018). Digital Literacy and Social Inclusion in Public Libraries: A Review of Research. In: : . Paper presented at ECIL: European Conference on Information Literacy, Oulu, Finland, September 24-27, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital Literacy and Social Inclusion in Public Libraries: A Review of Research
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The practices through which people manage and enrich their everyday lives rely increasingly on their ability to make use of digital and informational resources. In policy texts, physical and intellectual access to digital information has been framed as a problem of social inclusion to which the public library may be part of the solution (Thompson et al., 2014). In library research, there is some evidence that public libraries contribute positively in strengthening social capital and participation in society among its patrons (Johnson, 2010; Vårheim, 2014; Vårheim, Steinmo & Ide, 2008).

The present study investigates how the work done by public libraries to support digital and information literacy and, thus, potentially digital and social inclusion, is portrayed in the literature.

The literature review was based on publications from 2010-2017 collected through structured searches in the databases Web of Science, Scopus, and LISA. The publications were coded through qualitative content analysis (Altheide & Schneider, 2013) starting in the following analytical questions:

  • which public library services or activities are described;
  • which groups of patrons are intended beneficiaries;
  • which methods and theoretical approaches were used;
  • what were the main findings of the study;
  • which aspects of digital and information literacies are emphasized; which kinds of knowledge, perceptions and attitudes are these literacies intended to support?

Many of the publications describe community projects in which public libraries play a leading role. Several studies address concepts such as digital inclusion and social capital, although few studies actually engage with them theoretically. The types of activities, outcomes, literacies, and beneficiaries vary greatly, but much work is focused on supporting literacies for active citizenship and employability.

This literature review is a building block in constructing a theoretical framework and a research design for empirical studies of the development of digital and information literacy activities in public libraries and the possible implications for physical and digital community participation.

References

Altheide, D. L., & Schneider, C. J. (2013). Qualitative media analysis (2nd ed.). Los Angeles, CA: SAGE.

Johnson, C. A. (2010). Do public libraries contribute to social capital? A preliminary investigation into the relationship. Library & Information Science Research, 32(2), 147–155.

Thompson, K. M. et al. (2014). Digital literacy and digital inclusion: Information policy and the public library. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.

Vårheim, A., Steinmo, S., & Ide, E. (2008). Do libraries matter? Public libraries and the creation of social capital. Journal of Documentation, 64(6), 877–892.

Vårheim, A. (2014). Trust in libraries and trust in most people: Social capital creation in the public library. The Library Quarterly, 84(3), 258–277.

Keywords
public libraries, social participation, social capital, digital literacy, digital resources
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15496 (URN)
Conference
ECIL: European Conference on Information Literacy, Oulu, Finland, September 24-27, 2018
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Olsson, L., Aldberg, H., Francke, H., Kronman, U. & Willén, N. (2018). Evaluation of Offset Agreements – Report 3: Springer Compact. Stockholm: Kungliga biblioteket
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of Offset Agreements – Report 3: Springer Compact
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2018 (English)Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Kungliga biblioteket, 2018. p. 17
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15502 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Olsson, L., Aldberg, H., Francke, H., Kronman, U., Lindelöw, C. & Willén, N. (2018). Evaluation of Offset Agreements – Report 4: Springer Compact. Stockholm: Kungliga biblioteket
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of Offset Agreements – Report 4: Springer Compact
Show others...
2018 (English)Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Kungliga biblioteket, 2018. p. 20
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15501 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Francke, H. (2018). Open Access Made Easy. In: : . Paper presented at NordILL 2018: The 13th Nordic Resource Sharing Reference and Collection Management Conference, Umeå, October 10-12, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Open Access Made Easy
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

Studies have shown a steady but slow uptake of open access to the scholarly literature over the past decade, with estimations that roughly 25 to 30 per cent of journal articles are available open access on publication. Funders and governments, especially in Europe, have taken various steps to support open access and to increase access to publications, including the recently announced cOAlition S, which is intended to significantly speed up the move towards full gold open access. As an interim solution, some consortia have signed offset agreements with publishers, for instance the Read & Publish agreement Springer Compact between Swedish Bibsam and Springer Nature (2016-2018). This talk will present findings from a survey with authors whose publications were covered through Springer Compact. What are their reactions to publishing open access in this way? What kind of support do they wish from their universities and libraries? What implications may their experiences, views and suggestions have for future initiatives and for library services?

Keywords
open access, offset agreements, authors
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15498 (URN)
Conference
NordILL 2018: The 13th Nordic Resource Sharing Reference and Collection Management Conference, Umeå, October 10-12, 2018
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Francke, H. (2018). Researcher attitudes to offset agreements for OA publishing. In: The 13th Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing 2018: . Paper presented at The 13th Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing 2018. UiT The Arctic University of Norway, November 28–29, 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Researcher attitudes to offset agreements for OA publishing
2018 (English)In: The 13th Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing 2018, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Swedish government has expressed an intention to move towards open access (OA) to publications based on publicly funded research in Sweden. As part of fulfilling this intention, the Bibsam Consortium, working on behalf of a number of Swedish universities, government agencies, and research institutes, has started to include OA in their negotiations with publishers. One consequence is that Bibsam has followed other international actors and entered into a number of offset agreements. The first of these agreements was Springer Compact, which runs from July 2016 to December 2018. The implementation and consequences of this agreement are being investigated at the request of Bibsam, and this presentation builds on findings from this investigation.

Offset agreements are presented as one possible road ahead, a temporary one, in the transition towards OA to scholarly publications. A number of factors, including costs and the speed of flipping hybrid journals to full OA, will determine the success of such agreements. The attitudes of the researchers – the authors of the publications – are also key in determining the outcome. This presentation reports on findings from a questionnaire submitted by 375 first authors of articles covered by the Swedish Springer Compact agreement. It will present the authors’ attitudes to OA, to the Springer Compact agreement, and to future similar agreements.

The study shows that only about one quarter of respondents knew about the agreement before submitting their work. A majority would not have paid article processing charges (APC) for their article had APCs not been covered by the agreement. Many are generally positive to OA publishing, however. When asked what they think about agreements such as Springer Compact, three quarters wrote in free-text answers that it is “good”, “very good” or “excellent”. Respondents express both appreciation of the easy process and a relief over not having to find funding for OA.

Some respondents were more tentative, saying that they appreciate OA, but that their opinion about the agreement depends on the cost. Non-profit solutions to academic publishing or alternative methods to achieving OA were also mentioned as desirable. A small number of respondents would prefer the traditional subscription model. Yet, the vast majority of respondents say they would like to see similar agreements with other publishers.

The answers to the questionnaire show that these researchers are very positive to having their work published OA if it is not associated with costs, limitations, or other hassles for the researcher. That is, if publishing remains no more problematic than in the subscription system, researchers see many benefits with OA. However, there is a minority which expresses ideological hesitation. From this, universities and funders can learn the value of facilitating OA publishing for the individual researcher, but also that many researchers will expect agreements to be economically feasible and that there is a potential to engaging researchers even more in the discussion of future solutions.

Keywords
offset agreements, authors, researchers, attitudes, open access
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15493 (URN)10.7557/5.4540 (DOI)
Conference
The 13th Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing 2018. UiT The Arctic University of Norway, November 28–29, 2018.
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Francke, H. & Ekman, S. (2018). Using Active Learning Classrooms in Building an Infrastructure for Access to Research Data. In: The 13th Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing 2018.: . Paper presented at The 13th Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing 2018. UiT The Arctic University of Norway, November 28–29, 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using Active Learning Classrooms in Building an Infrastructure for Access to Research Data
2018 (English)In: The 13th Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing 2018., 2018Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

As a central part of its work towards Open Science, Sweden is building an infrastructure for managing, storing, and providing access to research data. A vital component of this infrastructure will be functions at Swedish universities for supporting researchers with data access and management. To support these local functions, here referred to as Data Access Units (DAUs), a national network of DAUs from 28 universities is under formation.

To assist in establishing DAUs and strengthening the network, the Swedish National Data Service and the University of Borås offer a joint professional development course to DAU staff. This course ran for the first time in spring 2018, with 21 participants from 12 universities. The course has three main objectives: to develop data management skills; to increase understanding of the institutional conditions for providing access to research data; and to strengthen the national network through interpersonal connections and collegial ties.

The methodology chosen for the course is intended to promote collaboration between participants and to take into consideration their various types and levels of expertise and experience. This has resulted in a distance-learning course with four physical meetings, during which an Active Learning Classroom (ALC) methodology is used: participants work actively in groups with instructor-facilitated tasks. The ALC work is combined with significant use of collaborative work between meetings.

Our presentation will show how ALC methodology can be used to support the establishment of DAUs and a DAU network. We will discuss some examples of course elements which contribute to the objectives. The discussion will be based on the facilitators’ analyses and on the participants’ answers to an evaluation questionnaire.

  • Participants found that they developed data management skills by working with cases as ALC exercises, and thought these skills would be directly applicable to their work in the DAU. Such ALC exercises were designed around for instance anonymising datasets and writing a data management plan for a potential study.
  • In addressing institutional conditions necessary for data access, we observed how task design and perceived relevance of a topic are important for how participants engage with various aspects of a task. For example, the ALC exercise on legal frameworks was easier to align with perceived DAU needs than the less focused and more abstract exercise on models and principles such as OAIS and FAIR.
  • A clear outcome of the course was a strengthening of the DAU network. Participants gained a sense of collegiality by working in different constellations during various ALC tasks. The social activities – breaks and meals – intentionally included in the course also allowed classroom discussions to flow into more informal spaces.

The DAUs and their national network is a vital part of the Swedish infrastructure for Open Science concerning access to research data. The presentation will end with reflections on how ALC methodology can also be employed to strengthen data management and accessibility skills in other parts of the infrastructure, for instance with researchers

Keywords
research data, management, access, education, active learning classrooms
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15487 (URN)10.7557/5.4538 (DOI)
Conference
The 13th Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing 2018. UiT The Arctic University of Norway, November 28–29, 2018.
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2018-12-28Bibliographically approved
Mansour, A. & Francke, H. (2017). Credibility assessments of everyday life information on Facebook: a sociocultural investigation of a group of mothers. Information research, 22(2), Article ID paper750.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Credibility assessments of everyday life information on Facebook: a sociocultural investigation of a group of mothers
2017 (English)In: Information research, ISSN 1368-1613, E-ISSN 1368-1613, Vol. 22, no 2, article id paper750Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction. The article explores whether members of a Facebook group view the group as a source of credible information and how they evaluate the credibility of information provided in the group. Method. The data for this study were collected using semi-structured interviews with 19 members of a closed Facebook group for mothers. Analysis. The constant comparison technique was used to analyse the interview transcripts which were interpreted from a sociocultural perspective using the concepts of cultural tools and cognitive authority. Results. The findings show that although the participants used the Facebook group to seek information, they did not consider it a credible source of information. The study contributes the insight that assessments depended on the domain of the information and that participants distinguished between information offered in a professional or a personal capacity. A number of cultural tools were employed to negotiate credibility assessments, including language use and writing style, expertise, life experience, educational background, and similar lifestyles, parenting values and worldviews. Conclusions. The Facebook group was characterised by a combination of familiar and unfamiliar others, of the sharing and seeking of information from different domains and of first- and second-hand knowledge. The participants employed various cultural tools to assess credibility in this mixture of knowledge domains and information sources.

Keywords
social media, social networking sites, Facebook, mothers, credibility, credibility assessment, trust, information seeking, everyday life information, sociocultural theory, cognitive authority, computer mediated communication
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12229 (URN)
Projects
LinCS
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 349-2006-146
Available from: 2017-06-15 Created: 2017-06-15 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Francke, H., Gamalielsson, J. & Lundell, B. (2017). Institutional repositories as infrastructures for long-term preservation. Information research, 22(2), Article ID paper757.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Institutional repositories as infrastructures for long-term preservation
2017 (English)In: Information research, ISSN 1368-1613, E-ISSN 1368-1613, Vol. 22, no 2, article id paper757Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction. The study describes the conditions for long-term preservation of the content of the institutional repositories of Swedish higher education institutions based on an investigation of how deposited files are managed with regards to file format and how representatives of the repositories describe the functions of the repositories. Method. The findings are based on answers to a questionnaire completed by thirty-four institutional repository representatives (97% response rate). Analysis. Questionnaire answers were analysed through descriptive statistics and qualitative coding. The concept of information infrastructures was used to analytically discuss repository work. Results. Visibility and access to content were considered to be the most important functions of the repositories, but long-term preservation was also considered important for publications and student theses. Whereas a majority of repositories had some form of guidelines for which file formats were accepted, very few considered whether or not file formats constitute open standards. This can have consequences for the long-term sustainability and access of the content deposited in the repositories. Conclusion. The study contributes to the discussion about the sustainability of research publications and data in the repositories by pointing to the potential difficulties involved for long-term preservation and access when there is little focus on and awareness of open file formats.

Keywords
institutional repositories, preservation, sustainability, file formats, information infrastructures, research data, open access
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12230 (URN)
Projects
Öppna e-tjänster
Funder
Region Västra Götaland
Available from: 2017-06-15 Created: 2017-06-15 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Olsson, L., Aldberg, H., Francke, H., Kronman, U. & Willén, N. (2017). Utvärdering av offset-avtal – delrapport 2: Springer Compact och Institute of Physics. Stockholm: Kungliga biblioteket
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Utvärdering av offset-avtal – delrapport 2: Springer Compact och Institute of Physics
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2017 (Swedish)Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Kungliga biblioteket, 2017. p. 24
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15503 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5572-8566

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