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Langelotz, L. & Mahon, K. (2018). Academic Leading with a Focus on Student Learning. In: : . Paper presented at Forskning om Högre Utbildning, Lund 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Academic Leading with a Focus on Student Learning
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Academic Leading with a Focus on Student Learning

Few people would deny that universities are becoming increasingly complex educational environments due to significant changes in the nature of academic work (e.g., digitalisation of work and learning, educational administration, changing faculty values[1]) and to changing societal expectations. Those in university leadership roles face challenges and opportunities amidst this complexity, especially regarding responsibilities associated with student learning. The capacity of leaders and managers to respond is arguably affected by the arrangements and practices embedded within their own universities. Understanding these challenges and opportunities, and how current arrangements and practices contribute to or limit them, is central for finding sustainable ways of meeting educational responsibilities and supporting leading for student learning.

This paper explores one university’s efforts to enhance academic leading with a focus on student learning, and to understand the site-based arrangements and practices affecting the practices of leading. These goals underpinned a series of four seminars on ‘Academic leading – with a focus on student learning’ developed for staff in management positions. The seminars were inquiry-focused, generating participant artefacts (e.g., diagrams, PowerPoint presentations, notes) that were used to inform seminar discussions. This material was also analysed to form the basis of this paper. Both the seminars and analysis were theoretically framed by the ‘theory of practice architectures’ and ‘ecologies of practices’[2]. According to the theory, practices are shaped by three kinds of overlapping arrangements: Cultural-discursive arrangements such as discourses and languages affect what is possible to say in and about practice (e.g., deficit discourses, critical discourses, discipline-specific discourses, languages). Material economic-arrangements – material, technological, financial, organisational, and other resources – affect what it is possible to do in practice (e.g., buildings, schedules, workload calculators, funding). Social-political arrangements are arrangements that affect the ways in which it is possible for people to relate to others (and things and places) in practice (e.g., organisational rules, mandates, solidarities, hierarchies). These arrangements form the practice architectures of practices like leading, teaching, and learning. 

The analysis highlighted, from a cultural-discursive perspective, the need for explicitly focussing on the learning environment in everyday activities, and for clear articulation of goals and visions on both institutional and departmental levels. These are important for the emergence of shared understandings needed for growth in the area of student learning. From a material-economic perspective, analysis also pointed to the need for opportunities (i.e., time) for staff to reflect in organised ways on their practice and engage in professional learning activities, and for managers to engage in strategic development. This means looking closely at minimising activities and reorienting arrangements that take up time that could otherwise be spent on developing good pedagogical work (e.g., administrative tasks). From a social-political perspective, the analysis emphasised the need for building trusting, productive staff relations within and between departments, academies, and administration.

The paper invites discussion of the issues raised and consideration of how these issues resonate with educational environments in other universities and how they are being, or might be, addressed. It raises the question of how we can more effectively and sustainably support leading for student learning given the challenges and complexities of academic environments, by creating new practice architectures or by reorienting existing ones that constrain leading and professional learning in unhelpful ways.

[1] Slaughter, S., and Leslie, L., L.  (1997). Academic Capitalism. Politics, Policies and the Entrepreneurial University. Baltimore, Maryland USA: John Hopkins University Press.

[2] Kemmis, S., Wilkinson, J., Edwards-Groves, C., Hardy, I., Grootenboer, P., & Bristol, L. (2014). Changing practices, changing education. Singapore: Springer.

Keywords
academic leading, student learning, practice architectures
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15163 (URN)
Conference
Forskning om Högre Utbildning, Lund 2018
Available from: 2018-10-05 Created: 2018-10-05 Last updated: 2018-10-17Bibliographically approved
Sjølie, E., Francisco, S. & Langelotz, L. (2018). Communicative learning spaces and learning to become a teacher. Pedagogy, Culture & Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communicative learning spaces and learning to become a teacher
2018 (English)In: Pedagogy, Culture & Society, ISSN 1468-1366, E-ISSN 1747-5104, ISSN 1468-1366Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores teacher learning. It focuses on access to ‘communicative learning spaces’ (a concept we coin and develop within this paper) and argues that the creation of such spaces can be a powerful enabler of teacher learning. We draw on the findings from three studies conducted in three different countries - Norway, Australia and Sweden. The studies focused on different stages of teacher learning - initial teacher education, the induction phase of teacher learning in the workplace, and the continuing professional learning of in-service teachers.  The paper considers the features that characterise communicative learning spaces and their development. Using the theory of practice architectures we examine what enabled and constrained the development of these communicative learning spaces in each of the three cases. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2018
Keywords
Communicative space, professional learning, collaborative learning, work-place learning, teacher education, communicative learning space
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14886 (URN)10.1080/14681366.2018.1500392 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-08-07 Created: 2018-08-07 Last updated: 2018-08-08Bibliographically approved
Langelotz, L., Wilkinson, J. & Kaukko, M. (2018). How to research praxis and praxis development. In: Professor Annette Woods AARE President (Ed.), AUSTRALIAN ASSOCIATION FOR RESEARCH IN EDUCATION (AARE) CONFERENCE 2018: Education Research Matters: Impact and Engagement. Paper presented at AARE, Sydney, December 2-6, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How to research praxis and praxis development
2018 (English)In: AUSTRALIAN ASSOCIATION FOR RESEARCH IN EDUCATION (AARE) CONFERENCE 2018: Education Research Matters: Impact and Engagement / [ed] Professor Annette Woods AARE President, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This abstract is part of symposium 'Pedagogy, Education and Praxis: A ten-year progress report from an international research network'

Drawing on the work of Pedagogy Education and Praxis (PEP) research network across the last ten years, this presentation maps research approaches that have been used to facilitate praxis and praxis development in diffrent (inter)national contexts. Starting from theoretical approaches that seem to cut across educational praxis reserach (theory of Practice Architectures and its roots in Aristotle and Marx), we move to be emerging trends within the PEP reserach literature (such as feminist approaches). We also deliberate the conditions under which praxis research might be conducted (and by whom), in diffrent educational settings, and in diffrent national contexts.Here, the differing ideas, discourses, philosophies and educational traditions underpinning different national contexts are significant. We argue for the potential of praxis research to draw on multiple, less dominant theories and methods to enrich the knowledge base, and, in order to 'see things diffrentley' encourage greater diversity in methods within praxis research.  

National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15601 (URN)
Conference
AARE, Sydney, December 2-6, 2018
Available from: 2019-01-04 Created: 2019-01-04 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved
Langelotz, L. & Mahon, K. (2018). Leading for learning in higher education - challenges and possibilities. In: Professor Annette Woods AARE President (Ed.), AUSTRALIAN ASSOCIATION FOR RESEARCH IN EDUCATION (AARE) CONFERENCE 2018: Education Research Matters: Impact and Engagement. Paper presented at Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) Conference 2018, Sydney, December 2-6, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leading for learning in higher education - challenges and possibilities
2018 (English)In: AUSTRALIAN ASSOCIATION FOR RESEARCH IN EDUCATION (AARE) CONFERENCE 2018: Education Research Matters: Impact and Engagement / [ed] Professor Annette Woods AARE President, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Leading for learning in higher education – challenges and possibilities

Lill Langelotz and Kathleen Mahon, University of Borås, Sweden

Few people would deny that universities are becoming increasingly complex educational environments due to significant changes in the nature of academic work and to changing societal expectations. University leaders face challenges and opportunities amidst this complexity, especially regarding responsibilities associated with student learning. The capacity of leaders and managers to respond is arguably affected by the arrangements and practices embedded within their own universities. Understanding these challenges and opportunities, and how current arrangements and practices contribute to or limit them, is central for finding sustainable ways of meeting educational responsibilities and supporting leading for student learning.

This paper explores one Swedish university’s effort to enhance academic leading, and to understand the salient site-based arrangements and practices affecting leading for learning. These goals underpinned a series of four seminars on ‘Academic leading – with a focus on student learning’ developed for all staff in management positions (including administration). The seminars were inquiry-focused, generating participant artefacts (e.g., diagrams, PowerPoint presentations) that were used to inform seminar discussions. This material was also analysed as part of an ongoing practitioner inquiry aimed at understanding and addressing site-based challenges for academic leading. Both the seminars and analysis were theoretically framed by the ‘theory of practice architectures’[1].

Initial results show a need for explicitly focussing on the learning environment in everyday activities, and for clear articulation of goals and visions on both institutional and departmental levels. They also point to the importance of opportunities (i.e., time) for staff to reflect in organised ways on their practice and engage in professional learning activities and strategic development, as well as the need for further interrogation of activities that take up time that could otherwise be spent on developing good pedagogical work (e.g., administrative tasks). From a social-political perspective, the results emphasise the need for building trusting, productive staff relations within and between departments, faculties, and administration teams.

The paper raises the question, on the basis of the analysis, of how we can more effectively and sustainably support leading for learning given the challenges and complexities of academic environments, by creating new practice architectures and/or by reorienting existing ones that constrain leading and professional learning in unhelpful ways.

[1] Kemmis, S., Wilkinson, J., Edwards-Groves, C., Hardy, I., Grootenboer, P., & Bristol, L. (2014). Changing practices, changing education. Singapore: Springer.

Keywords
leading practices in higher education, theory of practice architectures
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15599 (URN)
Conference
Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) Conference 2018, Sydney, December 2-6, 2018
Available from: 2019-01-04 Created: 2019-01-04 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Mahon, K., Sjoelie, E., Kemmis, S., Langelotz, L., Boyle, T., Kauko, M. & Santos, D. (2018). Researching practice in higher education. In: Professor Annette Woods AARE President (Ed.), AUSTRALIAN ASSOCIATION FOR RESEARCH IN EDUCATION (AARE) CONFERENCE 2018: Education Research Matters: Impact and Engagement. Paper presented at Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) Conference 2018, Sydney, December 2-6, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Researching practice in higher education
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2018 (English)In: AUSTRALIAN ASSOCIATION FOR RESEARCH IN EDUCATION (AARE) CONFERENCE 2018: Education Research Matters: Impact and Engagement / [ed] Professor Annette Woods AARE President, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15600 (URN)
Conference
Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) Conference 2018, Sydney, December 2-6, 2018
Available from: 2019-01-04 Created: 2019-01-04 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Langelotz, L. (2018). Tensions in Inclusive Practices. In: Inclusion and Exclusion, Resources for Educational Research?: Symposium: Creating Sustainable Inclusive Educational Environments. Paper presented at ECER 2018, Bolzano, 4-7 September, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tensions in Inclusive Practices
2018 (English)In: Inclusion and Exclusion, Resources for Educational Research?: Symposium: Creating Sustainable Inclusive Educational Environments, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The tension between how the concept of inclusive education is verbalised in various educational policies and practices, and how it is realised in classroom practices, is examined in this paper. The data derive from an ongoing research and development programme (Inkluderande lärmiljöer/Inclusive learning environments) in seven municipalities in Sweden, orchestrated by a research institute (Ifous) over three years (2017-2019). The aim is to enhance inclusion within the schools taking part in the programme, through for example lectures and seminaries arranged by the institute. The programme includes administrative management at municipality level, school management, teachers and student health professionals from across the school sector. It also includes a group of researchers, conducting different studies, with ‘inclusive learning environment’ as a common and overall orientation. This paper is theoretically framed by the ‘theory of practice architectures’ and ‘ecologies of practices’ (Kemmis et al, 2014). According to the theory, practices are shaped by three kinds of overlapping arrangements: Cultural-discursive arrangements such as discourses and languages affect what is possible to say in and about practice (e.g., deficit discourses, critical discourses, discipline-specific discourses, languages). Material economic arrangements – for example material, technological, financial, organisational, and other resources – affect what it is possible to do in practice (e.g., buildings, schedules, workload calculators, funding). Social-political arrangements are those that affect the ways in which it is possible for people to relate to others (and things and places) in practice (e.g., organisational rules, mandates, solidarities, hierarchies). These arrangements form the practice architectures of practices such as leading, teaching, and learning. The first analysis shows a gap between the different levels involved. The administrative management and the teachers have different views on whether or not there are student groups divided into smaller ‘special need’ groups. Furthermore, there is an ambition at the administrative level to transfer students, labeled as ‘students with special needs’, into ‘ordinary classes’. This ambition clashes sometimes with the teachers’ understanding of how to promote inclusion. The data also reveal a worry concerning ‘transitions’. Participants in the programme describe transitions, as ‘critical moments’ as well as ‘challenging’. The transitions include for example, the transfer of students from third grade to fourth grade or merging two classes together, including special education classes. How well these transitions are handled varies significantly amongst the schools in the programme.

Keywords
Inclusive Education, Practice Architectures
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15162 (URN)
Conference
ECER 2018, Bolzano, 4-7 September, 2018
Projects
Inkluderande lärmiljöer
Available from: 2018-10-05 Created: 2018-10-05 Last updated: 2018-10-17Bibliographically approved
Langelotz, L. & Mahon, K. (2017). Academic leading - with a focus on student learning.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Academic leading - with a focus on student learning
2017 (English)Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

This report provides a summary and analysis of activities and material generated in the seminar series ‘Academic leading – with a focus on student learning’ developed for staff in management positions at the University of Borås (UB), 2017. The aims of the report are (a) to draw attention to some areas of need and concern that arose during discussions in the seminars (reflected in participants’ written responses in seminar activities); and (b) to make recommendations for consideration of the University’s executive team related to identified concerns/areas of need.

Seminar discussions highlighted that there are currently many practices (including leading practices) and arrangements within the University that enhance, or support enhancement of, the learning environment. However, discussions also highlighted some constraining university arrangements and challenges faced in fulfilling leading/managing responsibilities that have implications for the learning environment. These include a range of issues from staff workloads to staffing issues and staff relations.  Such issues, it is argued in this report, warrant further discussion/investigation and potentially changes to practices and arrangements in order to sustain and create an environment more conducive to student learning and leading with a focus on student learning.  As well as offering some recommendations in this regard, the report also presents an evaluation of the seminars. 

Publisher
p. 18
Keywords
academic leading, student learning, practice architectures
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13083 (URN)
Available from: 2017-12-07 Created: 2017-12-07 Last updated: 2017-12-19Bibliographically approved
Langelotz, L. (2017). Collegial Mentoring for Professional Development (1ed.). In: Kathleen Mahon, Susanne Francisco and Stephen Kemmis (Ed.), Exploring Education and Professional Practice: Through the Lens of Practice Architectures (pp. 139-149). Singapore: Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collegial Mentoring for Professional Development
2017 (English)In: Exploring Education and Professional Practice: Through the Lens of Practice Architectures / [ed] Kathleen Mahon, Susanne Francisco and Stephen Kemmis, Singapore: Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2017, 1, p. 139-149Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Various forms of mentoring and 'collegial learning' are often used to enhance teachers' continued professional development. When teachers come together to scrutinise their own questions raised from practice, sustainable changes in teaching and classroom situations increase. To understand what happens in the practice of continuing professional development (CPD), and to examine what professional learning is possible in the specific practice, it is crucial to examine the arrangements that hold the practice in place. In this chapter, a practice of teachers'professional group mentoring is examined through the lens of practice architectures. Foucault's notion of power is also used as a theoretical frame. This analytical approach brings new insight to what enables and constrains professional learning in mentoring practices. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Singapore: Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2017 Edition: 1
Keywords
practice theory, practice architectures, Foucault, teachers' professional learning, peer group mentoring
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13082 (URN)978-981-10-2217-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-12-07 Created: 2017-12-07 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Langelotz, L., Hesslow, E. & Tyrén, L. (2017). Följeforskning i Läslyftet, Kungsbacka kommun 2016/17.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Följeforskning i Läslyftet, Kungsbacka kommun 2016/17
2017 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Publisher
p. 11
Keywords
Läslyft, lärares kompetensutveckling, praktikteorier
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13121 (URN)
Projects
Läslyftet Kungsbacka Kommun 2016/17
Available from: 2017-12-11 Created: 2017-12-11 Last updated: 2017-12-15Bibliographically approved
Langelotz, L. (2017). Kollegialt lärande i praktiken: Kompetensutveckling eller kollegial korrigering? (1ed.). Stockholm: Natur och kultur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kollegialt lärande i praktiken: Kompetensutveckling eller kollegial korrigering?
2017 (Swedish)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [sv]

Boken Kollegialt lärande i praktiken – kompetensutveckling eller kollektiv korrigering? förklarar hur kollegialt lärande kan bidra till att lärare, elever och deras föräldrar får reellt inflytande på undervisningen. Med avstamp i praktiknära studier i utbildningssammanhang och utifrån en praktikteoretisk ansats – teorin om praktikarkitekturer – analyserar och problematiserar Lill Langelotz fenomenet kollegialt lärande, samt belyser både emanciperande och stigmatiserande processer. Boken visar även hur demokratiska praktiker med elevers lärande i fokus möjliggörs. Då det svenska utbildningssystemet ska genomsyras av en demokratisk undervisning utgör boken därmed ett unikt, teoretiskt och viktigt bidrag till litteraturen om lärares kompetensutveckling.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2017. p. 150 Edition: 1
Keywords
kollegialt lärande, praktikarkitekturer, lärares professionsutveckling, Foucault, Arendt
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Teacher Education and Education Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13043 (URN)9789127146501 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-12-05 Created: 2017-12-05 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1424-6063

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