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Lennartsson, Patrik R.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3418-1762
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Publications (10 of 58) Show all publications
Shahryari, Z., Fazaelipoor, M. H., Ghasemi, Y., Lennartsson, P. R. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2019). Amylase and Xylanase from Edible Fungus Neurospora intermedia: Production and Characterization. Molecules, 24(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Amylase and Xylanase from Edible Fungus Neurospora intermedia: Production and Characterization
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2019 (English)In: Molecules, ISSN 1420-3049, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 24, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Integrated enzyme production in the biorefinery can significantly reduce the cost of the entire process. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the production of two hydrolyzing enzymes (amylase and xylanase) by an edible fungus used in the biorefinery, Neurospora intermedia. The enzyme production was explored through submerged fermentation of synthetic media and a wheat-based waste stream (thin stillage and wheat bran). The influence of a nitrogen source on N. intermedia was investigated and a combination of NaNO3 and yeast extract has been identified as the best nitrogen source for extracellular enzyme production. N. intermedia enzymes showed maximum activity at 65 degrees C and pH around 5. Under these conditions, the maximum velocity of amylase and xylanase for starch and xylan hydrolysis was found to be 3.25 U mL(-1) and 14.77 U mL(-1), respectively. Cultivation of N. intermedia in thin stillage and wheat bran medium resulted in relatively high amylase (8.86 +/- 0.41 U mL(-1), 4.68 +/- 0.23) and xylanase (5.48 +/- 0.21, 2.58 +/- 0.07 U mL(-1)) production, respectively, which makes this fungus promising for enzyme production through a wheat-based biorefinery.

Keywords
amylase, xylanase, Neurospora intermedia, submerged fermentation, wheat-based biorefinery
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21530 (URN)10.3390/molecules24040721 (DOI)000460805900067 ()2-s2.0-85061562758 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-07
Gmoser, R., Ferreira, J., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Lennartsson, P. R. (2019). Post-treatment of Fungal Biomass to Enhance Pigment Production. Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Post-treatment of Fungal Biomass to Enhance Pigment Production
2019 (English)In: Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology, ISSN 0273-2289, E-ISSN 1559-0291Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A new post-treatment method of fungal biomass after fermentation is revealed. The post-treatment strategy was utilized to produce pigments as an additional valuable metabolite. Post-treatment included incubation at 95% relative humidity where the effects of harvesting time, light, and temperature were studied. Pigment-producing edible filamentous fungus Neurospora intermedia cultivated on ethanol plant residuals produced 4 g/L ethanol and 5 g/L fungal biomass. Harvesting the pale biomass after 48 h submerged cultivation compared to 24 h or 72 h increased pigmentation in the post-treatment step with 35% and 48%, respectively. The highest pigment content produced, 1.4 mg/g dry fungal biomass, was obtained from washed biomass treated in light at 35 °C whereof the major impact on pigmentation was from washed biomass. Moreover, post-treated biomass contained 50% (w/w) crude protein. The post-treatment strategy successfully adds pigments to pre-obtained biomass. The pigmented fungal biomass can be considered for animal feed applications for domestic animals.

Keywords
Pigments, Neurospora intermedia, Carotenoids, Edible filamentous fungi, Post-treatment
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21568 (URN)10.1007/s12010-019-02961-y (DOI)2-s2.0-85064279196 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-07
Bátori, V., Lundin, M., Åkesson, D., Lennartsson, P. R., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Zamani, A. (2019). The Effect of Glycerol, Sugar, and Maleic Anhydride on Pectin-Cellulose Thin Films Prepared from Orange Waste. POLYMERS, 11(3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effect of Glycerol, Sugar, and Maleic Anhydride on Pectin-Cellulose Thin Films Prepared from Orange Waste
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2019 (English)In: POLYMERS, Vol. 11, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study was conducted to improve the properties of thin films prepared from orange waste by the solution casting method. The main focus was the elimination of holes in the film structure by establishing better cohesion between the major cellulosic and pectin fractions. For this, a previously developed method was improved first by the addition of sugar to promote pectin gelling, then by the addition of maleic anhydride. Principally, maleic anhydride was introduced to the films to induce cross-linking within the film structure. The effects of concentrations of sugar and glycerol as plasticizers and maleic anhydride as a cross-linking agent on the film characteristics were studied. Maleic anhydride improved the structure, resulting in a uniform film, and morphology studies showed better adhesion between components. However, it did not act as a cross-linking agent, but rather as a compatibilizer. The middle level (0.78%) of maleic anhydride content resulted in the highest tensile strength (26.65 +/- 3.20 MPa) at low (7%) glycerol and high (14%) sugar levels and the highest elongation (28.48% +/- 4.34%) at high sugar and glycerol levels. To achieve a uniform film surface with no holes present, only the lowest (0.39%) level of maleic anhydride was necessary.

Keywords
bio-based, film, mechanical properties, polysaccharides, resource recovery, solution casting, orange waste
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21529 (URN)10.3390/polym11030392 (DOI)000464512900002 ()2-s2.0-85066752753 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-07
Nair, R. B., Gmoser, R., Lennartsson, P. R. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2018). Does the second messenger cAMP have a more complex role in controlling filamentous fungal morphology and metabolite production?. MicrobiologyOpen
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does the second messenger cAMP have a more complex role in controlling filamentous fungal morphology and metabolite production?
2018 (English)In: MicrobiologyOpen, ISSN 2045-8827, E-ISSN 2045-8827Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2018
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14831 (URN)10.1002/mbo3.627 (DOI)000440928500015 ()2-s2.0-85045101454 (Scopus ID)20458827 (ISSN) (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-08-02 Created: 2018-08-02 Last updated: 2018-11-29
Osadolor, O. A. (2018). Effect of media rheology and bioreactor hydrodynamics on filamentous fungi fermentation of lignocellulosic and starch-based substrates under pseudoplastic flow conditions. Bioresource Technology, 263, 250-257
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of media rheology and bioreactor hydrodynamics on filamentous fungi fermentation of lignocellulosic and starch-based substrates under pseudoplastic flow conditions
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2018 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 263, p. 250-257Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this work was to study how media rheology and bioreactor hydrodynamics would influence fermentation of lignocellulosic and starch-based substrates under pseudoplastic flow conditions. This was investigated using hydrolyzed wheat straw, wheat-based thin stillage and filamentous fungi as inoculum in bubble column, airlift and horizontal hybrid tubular/bubble column (textile bioreactor) bioreactors. The rheological models showed that the consistency index was dependent on biomass growth (R2 0.99) while the flow behavior index depended on biomass growth and suspended solid (R2 0.99). Oxygen transfer rate above 0.356 mmol-O2/L/h was needed for growing fungi with a cube-root growth rate constant of 0.03 g1/3/L1/3/h. At 1.4 VVM aeration the textile bioreactor performed better than others with minimal foaming, yields of 0.22 ± 0.01 g/g and 0.47 ± 0.01 g/g for ethanol and biomass, substrate consumption rate of 0.38 g/L/h. Operating the bioreactors with air-flowrate to cross-sectional area ratio of 8.75 × 10−3 (m3/s/m2) or more led to sustained foaming.

Keywords
Foaming Oxygen transfer rate, Rheology model, Fungi growth kinetics, Bioreactor hydrodynamics
National Category
Chemical Process Engineering
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14345 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2018.04.093 (DOI)000439317100030 ()2-s2.0-85046700875 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-21 Created: 2018-06-21 Last updated: 2018-11-29Bibliographically approved
Nair, R. B., Osadolor, O. A., Ravula, V. K., Lennartsson, P. R. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2018). Lignocellulose integration to 1G-ethanol process using filamentous fungi: Fermentation prospects of edible strain of Neurospora intermedia. BMC Biotechnology, 18(1), Article ID 49.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lignocellulose integration to 1G-ethanol process using filamentous fungi: Fermentation prospects of edible strain of Neurospora intermedia
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2018 (English)In: BMC Biotechnology, ISSN 1472-6750, E-ISSN 1472-6750, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Integration of first- and second-generation ethanol processes is one among the alternate approaches that efficiently address the current socio-economic issues of the bioethanol sector. Edible filamentous fungus capable of utilizing pentoses from lignocelluloses and also possessing biomass application as potential animal feed component was used as the fermentation strain for the integration model. This study presents various fermentation aspects of using edible filamentous fungi in the integrated first and second generation ethanol process model. Results: Fermentation of edible strain of N. intermedia on the integrated first and second-generation ethanol substrate (the mixture of dilute acid pretreated and enzymatically hydrolyzed wheat straw and thin stillage from the first-generation ethanol process), showed an ethanol yield maximum of 0.23 +/- 0.05 g/g dry substrate. The growth of fungal pellets in presence of fermentation inhibitors (such as acetic acid, HMF and furfural) resulted in about 11 to 45% increase in ethanol production as compared to filamentous forms, at similar growth conditions in the liquid straw hydrolysate. Fungal cultivations in the airlift reactor showed strong correlation with media viscosity, reaching a maximum of 209.8 +/- 3.7 cP and resulting in 18.2 +/- 1.3 g/L biomass during the growth phase of fungal pellets. Conclusion: N. intermedia fermentation showed high sensitivity to the dilute acid lignocellulose pretreatment process, with improved fermentation performance at milder acidic concentrations. The rheological examinations showed media viscosity to be the most critical factor influencing the oxygen transfer rate during the N. intermedia fermentation process. Mycelial pellet morphology showed better fermentation efficiency and high tolerance towards fermentation inhibitors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central Ltd., 2018
Keywords
Integration, Lignocelluloses, Bioethanol, Edible filamentous fungi, Neurospora intermedia
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15626 (URN)10.1186/s12896-018-0444-z (DOI)2-s2.0-85051932650 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-08-07
Lennartsson, P. R., Ferreira, J. A., Taherzadeh, M. J., Lundin, M. & Gmoser, R. (2018). Pigment Production by the Edible Filamentous Fungus Neurospora Intermedia. Fermentation, 4(11), 1-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pigment Production by the Edible Filamentous Fungus Neurospora Intermedia
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2018 (English)In: Fermentation, ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 4, no 11, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The production of pigments by edible filamentous fungi is gaining attention as a result of the increased interest in natural sources with added functionality in the food, feed, cosmetic, pharmaceutical and textile industries. The filamentous fungus Neurospora intermedia, used for production of the Indonesian food “oncom”, is one potential source of pigments. The objective of the study was to evaluate the fungus’ pigment production. The joint effect from different factors (carbon and nitrogen source, ZnCl2, MgCl2 and MnCl2) on pigment production by N. intermedia is reported for the first time. The scale-up to 4.5 L bubble column bioreactors was also performed to investigate the effect of pH and aeration. Pigment production of the fungus was successfully manipulated by varying several factors. The results showed that the formation of pigments was strongly influenced by light, carbon, pH, the co-factor Zn2+ and first- to fourth-order interactions between factors. The highest pigmentation (1.19 ± 0.08 mg carotenoids/g dry weight biomass) was achieved in a bubble column reactor. This study provides important insights into pigmentation of this biotechnologically important fungus and lays a foundation for future utilizations of N. intermedia for pigment production. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: , 2018
Keywords
pigments; neurospora intermedia; carotenoids; edible filamentous fungi; ascomycetes
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13654 (URN)10.3390/fermentation4010011 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-02-14 Created: 2018-02-14 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Souza Filho, P., Nair, R., Andersson, D., Lennartsson, P. R. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2018). Vegan-mycoprotein concentrate from pea-processing industry byproduct using edible filamentous fungi. Fungal Biology and Biotechnology, 5(5)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vegan-mycoprotein concentrate from pea-processing industry byproduct using edible filamentous fungi
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2018 (English)In: Fungal Biology and Biotechnology, ISSN 2054-3085, Vol. 5, no 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Currently around one billion people in the world do not have access to a diet which provides enough protein and energy. However, the production of one of the main sources of protein, animal meat, causes severe impacts on the environment. The present study investigates the production of a vegan-mycoprotein concentrate from pea-industry byproduct (PpB), using edible filamentous fungi, with potential application in human nutrition. Edible fungal strains of Ascomycota (Aspergillus oryzaeFusarium venenatumMonascus purpureusNeurospora intermedia) and Zygomycota (Rhizopus oryzae) phyla were screened and selected for their protein production yield.

Results

A. oryzae had the best performance among the tested fungi, with a protein yield of 0.26 g per g of pea-processing byproduct from the bench scale airlift bioreactor cultivation. It is estimated that by integrating the novel fungal process at an existing pea-processing industry, about 680 kg of fungal biomass attributing to about 38% of extra protein could be produced for each 1 metric ton of pea-processing byproduct. This study is the first of its kind to demonstrate the potential of the pea-processing byproduct to be used by filamentous fungi to produce vegan-mycoprotein for human food applications.

Conclusion

The pea-processing byproduct (PpB) was proved to be an efficient medium for the growth of filamentous fungi to produce a vegan-protein concentrate. Moreover, an industrial scenario for the production of vegan-mycoprotein concentrate for human nutrition is proposed as an integrated process to the existing PPI production facilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Pea-processing byproduct, Edible filamentous fungi, Vegan-mycoprotein concentrate, Meat substitute
National Category
Other Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-14904 (URN)10.1186/s40694-018-0050-9 (DOI)29619233 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-08 Created: 2018-08-08 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Ferreira, J. A., Lennartsson, P. R. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2017). Airlift bioreactors for fish feed fungal biomass production using edible filamentous fungi. In: : . Paper presented at FFBiotech Symposium, Villeneuve, May 15-16, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Airlift bioreactors for fish feed fungal biomass production using edible filamentous fungi
2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Airlift bioreactors are generally considered to be better alternatives for cultivation of filamentous fungi in comparison to stirred-tank bioreactors or bubble columns bioreactors. The reason for the former includes fungal growth around all internal parts including impellers, baffles or pH, temperature and oxygen probes limiting mass transfer, whereas the latter is limited by air flow rates that can be applied before the system provides deficient mixing and so mass transfer rates. Spent sulphite liquor, a by-product from the paper pulp industry, was used for cultivation of edible Rhizopus sp., a strain isolated from Indonesian tempeh used as human food, using a 26 L airlift bioreactor. Increasing the aeration rate from 0.15 to 1 vvm led to increased biomass production (1 vs 7 g/L). The aeration rate was also found to influence fungal morphology and metabolite production during batch cultivation. Rhizopus sp. shifted from mycelial suspensions at 0.15 and 0.5 vvm to small compact pellets of regular size at 1 vvm. The production of ethanol and lactic acid, a proof of sub-optimal aeration conditions, was also reduced when increasing the aeration rate from 0.15 to 1 vvm. The produced biomass was found to be composed, on a dry weight basis, of 30-50% protein, 2-7% lipids, and 3-9% glucosamine. Considering the edible character of the fungus used as well as its biomass nutritional characteristics, there is a potential for its use as fishmeal replacement within the increasing aquaculture sector.

Keywords
Biomass, Edible filamentous fungi, Rhizopus sp
National Category
Chemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12205 (URN)
Conference
FFBiotech Symposium, Villeneuve, May 15-16, 2017
Available from: 2017-06-07 Created: 2017-06-07 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Ferreira, J. A., Lennartsson, P. R. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2017). Airlift bioreactors for fish feed fungal biomass production using edible filamentous fungi. In: FFBiotech Symposium, University of Lille, Villeneuve d'Ascq, France: . Paper presented at FFBiotech Symposium, Villeneuve d'Ascq, May 15-16, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Airlift bioreactors for fish feed fungal biomass production using edible filamentous fungi
2017 (English)In: FFBiotech Symposium, University of Lille, Villeneuve d'Ascq, France, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12527 (URN)
Conference
FFBiotech Symposium, Villeneuve d'Ascq, May 15-16, 2017
Available from: 2017-08-27 Created: 2017-08-27 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3418-1762

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