Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Taherzadeh, Mohammad JORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4887-2433
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 400) Show all publications
Mukesh Kumar, A., Sarsaiya, S., Wainaina, S., Rajendran, K., Kumar, S., Quan, W., . . . Jain, A. (2019). A critical review of organic manure biorefinery models toward sustainable circular bioeconomy: Technological challenges, advancements, innovations, and future perspectives. Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, 115-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A critical review of organic manure biorefinery models toward sustainable circular bioeconomy: Technological challenges, advancements, innovations, and future perspectives
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, p. 115-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Total livestock emissions account for up to 14.5% of man-made greenhouse gas emissions. Counteractive measures, such as circular economy concepts and negative emission technologies are necessary to limit global warming below 1.5 °C. Possible treatment options for organic manure include anaerobic digestion, combustion, gasification, hydrothermal liquefaction and composting. The choice of treatment varies depending on the economics, the requirement of a specific product, and sociocultural factors. Commercialization of these treatments needs a blend of appropriate technology, feasible economics, policy support and agreeable socio-cultural conditions. Key findings of this study include the following: 1. Increasing scientific awareness about manure management and treatment; 2. Building a sustainable cooperative model to commercialize technologies; 3. Creating a market for manure recycling products; 4. The role of policy in supporting technologies and consumers; and 5. The codigestion of substrates for better efficacy. Current trends show minimal actions in place as opposed to the high-rate of acceleration that is necessary.

Keywords
Anaerobic digestion, Organic manure, Pretreatment, Codigestion, Organic loading rate, Bioaugmentation
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21039 (URN)10.1016/j.rser.2019.05.017 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Shahryari, Z., Fazaelipoor, M. H., Ghasemi, Y., Lennartsson, P. R. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2019). Amylase and Xylanase from Edible Fungus Neurospora intermedia: Production and Characterization. Molecules, 24(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Amylase and Xylanase from Edible Fungus Neurospora intermedia: Production and Characterization
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Molecules, ISSN 1420-3049, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 24, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Integrated enzyme production in the biorefinery can significantly reduce the cost of the entire process. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the production of two hydrolyzing enzymes (amylase and xylanase) by an edible fungus used in the biorefinery, Neurospora intermedia. The enzyme production was explored through submerged fermentation of synthetic media and a wheat-based waste stream (thin stillage and wheat bran). The influence of a nitrogen source on N. intermedia was investigated and a combination of NaNO3 and yeast extract has been identified as the best nitrogen source for extracellular enzyme production. N. intermedia enzymes showed maximum activity at 65 degrees C and pH around 5. Under these conditions, the maximum velocity of amylase and xylanase for starch and xylan hydrolysis was found to be 3.25 U mL(-1) and 14.77 U mL(-1), respectively. Cultivation of N. intermedia in thin stillage and wheat bran medium resulted in relatively high amylase (8.86 +/- 0.41 U mL(-1), 4.68 +/- 0.23) and xylanase (5.48 +/- 0.21, 2.58 +/- 0.07 U mL(-1)) production, respectively, which makes this fungus promising for enzyme production through a wheat-based biorefinery.

Keywords
amylase, xylanase, Neurospora intermedia, submerged fermentation, wheat-based biorefinery
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21530 (URN)10.3390/molecules24040721 (DOI)000460805900067 ()2-s2.0-85061562758 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-07
Wainaina, S., Lukitawesa, L., Mukesh Kumar, A. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2019). Bioengineering of anaerobic digestion for volatile fatty acids, hydrogen or methane production: A critical review. Bioengineered
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioengineering of anaerobic digestion for volatile fatty acids, hydrogen or methane production: A critical review
2019 (English)In: Bioengineered, ISSN 2165-5979, E-ISSN 2165-5987, ISSN 2165-5979Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a well-established technology used for producing biogas or biomethane alongside the slurry used as biofertilizer. However, using a variety of wastes and residuals as substrate and mixed cultures in the bioreactor makes AD as one of the most complicated biochemical processes employing hydrolytic, acidogenic, hydrogen-producing, acetate-forming bacteria as well as acetoclastic and hydrogenoclastic methanogens. Hydrogen and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) including acetic, propionic, isobutyric, butyric, isovaleric, valeric and caproic acid and other carboxylic acids such as succinic and lactic acids are formed as intermediate products. As these acids are important precursors for various industries as mixed or purified chemicals, the AD process can be bioengineered to produce VFAs alongside hydrogen and therefore biogas plants can become biorefineries. The current critical review paper provides the theory and means to produce and accumulate VFAs and hydrogen, inhibit their conversion to methane and to extract them as the final products. The effects of pretreatment, pH, temperature, hydraulic retention time (HRT), organic loading rate (OLR), chemical methane inhibitions, and heat shocking of the inoculum on VFAs accumulation, hydrogen production, VFAs composition, and the microbial community were discussed. Furthermore, this paper highlights the possible techniques for recovery of VFAs from the fermentation media in order to minimize product inhibition as well as to supply the carboxylates for downstream procedures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
Anaerobic digestion, Metabolic pathways, Volatile fatty acids, Hydrogen, Biorefineries, Process parameters, Mixed culture fermentation, Inhibiting methanogens
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21807 (URN)10.1080/21655979.2019.1673937 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilMoRe ResearchSwedish Agency for Economic and Regional Growth
Available from: 2019-10-03 Created: 2019-10-03 Last updated: 2019-10-08Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, J., Landberg, M., Bátori, V., Åkesson, D., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Zamani, A. (2019). Development of Bio-Based Films and 3D Objects from Apple Pomace. Polymers, 11(2), Article ID 289.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of Bio-Based Films and 3D Objects from Apple Pomace
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Polymers, ISSN 2073-4360, E-ISSN 2073-4360, Vol. 11, no 2, article id 289Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Extensive quantities of apple pomace are generated annually but its disposal is still challenging. This study addresses this issue by introducing a new, environmentally-friendly approach for the production of sustainable biomaterials from apple pomace, containing 55.47% free sugars and a water insoluble fraction, containing 29.42 ± 0.44% hemicelluloses, 38.99 ± 0.42% cellulose, and 22.94 ± 0.12% lignin. Solution casting and compression molding were applied to form bio-based films and 3D objects (i.e., fiberboards), respectively. Using glycerol as plasticizer resulted in highly compact films with high tensile strength and low elongation (16.49 ± 2.54 MPa and 10.78 ± 3.19%, respectively). In contrast, naturally occurring sugars in the apple pomace showed stronger plasticizing effect in the films and resulted in a fluffier and connected structure with significantly higher elongation (37.39 ± 10.38% and 55.41 ± 5.38%, respectively). Benefiting from the self-binding capacity of polysaccharides, fiberboards were prepared by compression molding at 100 °C using glycerol or naturally occurring sugars, such as plasticizer. The obtained fiberboards exhibited tensile strength of 3.02–5.79 MPa and elongation of 0.93%–1.56%. Possible applications for apple pomace biomaterials are edible/disposable tableware or food packaging. 

Keywords
apple pomace, biofilm, biomaterials, compression molding, fiberboard, solution casting
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15718 (URN)10.3390/polym11020289 (DOI)2-s2.0-85061399977 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-28 Created: 2019-01-28 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Jansson, A., Patinvoh, R. J., Horvath, I. S. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2019). Dry Anaerobic Digestion of Food and Paper Industry Wastes at Different Solid Contents. Fermentation - Basel, 5(2), 1-10, Article ID 40.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dry Anaerobic Digestion of Food and Paper Industry Wastes at Different Solid Contents
2019 (English)In: Fermentation - Basel, E-ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 1-10, article id 40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A large volume of food is being wasted every year, while the pulp and paper industry also generate a large amount of solid wastes on a daily basis, causing environmental challenges around the world. Dry anaerobic digestion (AD) of these solid wastes is a cost-effective method for proper management. However, dry digestion of these waste streams has been restricted due to their complex structure, the presence of possible inhibitors and inappropriate operating conditions. In light of this fact, dry digestion of food waste (FW) and paper wastes (PW) was conducted at different total solid (TS) concentrations of reactor mixtures of 14%, 16%, 18% and 20% TS, corresponding to substrate to inoculum (S/I) ratio of 0.5 and 1; investigating the optimum operating conditions for effective dry digestion of these complex wastes. The highest methane yields of 402 NmlCH(4)/gVS and 229 NmlCH(4)/gVS were obtained from digestion of FW and PW, respectively at 14%TS corresponding to an S/I ratio of 0.5. Increasing the S/I ratio from 0.5 to 1 and thereby having a TS content of 20% in the reactor mixtures was unfavorable to the digestion of both substrates.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
dry anaerobic digestion, food waste, paper waste, biogas, digestate
National Category
Bioprocess Technology Bioenergy
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Bioenergy Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21562 (URN)10.3390/fermentation5020040 (DOI)000474935500011 ()
Available from: 2019-07-26 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Duan, Y., Awasthi, S. K., Liu, T., Chen, H., Zhang, Z., Wang, Q., . . . Taherzadeh, M. J. (2019). Dynamics of fungal diversity and interactions with environmental elements in response to wheat straw biochar amended poultry manure composting. Bioresource Technology, 410-417
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamics of fungal diversity and interactions with environmental elements in response to wheat straw biochar amended poultry manure composting
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, p. 410-417Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The fungal dynamics and its correlation with physicochemical and gaseous emission were investigated using metagenomics and Heat map illustrator (HEMI). Five different concentrations of wheat straw biochar (WSB) were applied to poultry manure (PM) and composted for 50 days; those without the WSB treatment were used as a control. The results revealed the dominant phyla to be ChytridiomycotaMucoromycotaAscomycota and Basidiomycota, while BatrachochytriumRhizophagus, Mucor, and Puccinia were the superior genera. In particular, the diversity of Chytridiomycota and Ascomycota was more abundant among all of the treatments. Overall, the diversity of the fungal species was correspondent, but relative abundance varied significantly among all of the composts. Principle Coordinate Analysis (PCoA) and Non-Metric Multi- Dimensional Scaling (NMDS) indicated that different concentrations of WSB applied treatments have significantly distinct fungal communities. In addition, correlation analyses of fungal interactions with environmental elements via HEMI also indicate a clear difference among the treatments. Ultimately, the relative abundance of fungal composition significantly influenced the PM compost treated by the WSB.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Fungal diversity, Environment factors, Wheat straw biochar, Poultry manure, Compost
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15614 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2018.12.020 (DOI)2-s2.0-85058070441 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-02-21Bibliographically approved
Aski, A. L., Borghei, A., Zenouzi, A., Ashrafi, N. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2019). Effect of Steam Explosion on the Structural Modification of Rice Straw for Enhanced Biodegradation and Biogas Production. BioResources, 14(1), 464-485
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of Steam Explosion on the Structural Modification of Rice Straw for Enhanced Biodegradation and Biogas Production
Show others...
2019 (English)In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 464-485Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The goal of this study was to develop an operational steam explosion pretreatment for effective modification of rice straw chemical structure in order to improve its biodegradability and methane yield. The parameters of pressure (5 bar to 15 bar), moisture (0% to 70%), and time (1 min to 15 min) were studied in steam explosion pretreatment. The steam explosion efficiency was investigated according to the changes in crystallinity structure and chemical composition on rice straw, as well as the methane yield from straw. Steam explosion changed the structure linkages between the lignin and carbohydrate, which was indicated by a reduction in the peak intensities in the bonds from 1648 cm(-1) to 1516 cm(-1). After pretreatment, the crystallinity index of the rice straw in the 10 bar-10 min cycle with no moisture and 15 bar-10 min cycle with 70% moisture increased from 22.9% to 28.3% and 28.6%, respectively. Steam explosion efficiently decreased the lignin. The highest reduction in the amount of lignin was observed with the 10 bar-10 min cycle, which reached from 18.6% to 13.0%. The methane yield increased with the cycles 10 bar-10 min and 15 bar-15 min with 35% moisture, and 15 bar-10 min with 70% moisture by 113%, 104%, and 147% compared to that of the untreated straw, respectively. Moreover, the highest biodegradation percent of the rice straw was obtained in these cycles.

National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21534 (URN)10.15376/biores.14.1.464-485 (DOI)000459494400036 ()2-s2.0-85061308044 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-07
Momayez, F., Karimi, K. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2019). Energy recovery from industrial crop wastes by dry anaerobic digestion: A review. Industrial crops and products (Print), 129, 673-687
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy recovery from industrial crop wastes by dry anaerobic digestion: A review
2019 (English)In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 129, p. 673-687Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the most sustainable methods for treating wastes and producing energy in the form of biogas. However, this process normally has a high content of water and low total solids (TS), which could be a challenge for regions with water scarcity or treating wastewater from the digestates. Dry fermentation or anaerobic digestion (Dry-AD) is a solid-state fermentation with high TS and is accelerating in the biogas industries. Dry-AD with high volumetric biogas productivity and high organic loading rate is an effective method for treating high solid content materials such as crop wastes. The present article is dedicated to reviewing methane production from industrial crops waste through Dry-AD. The major industrial crops such as corn stover, wheat straw, and sugarcane bagasse as well as their generated wastes, composition, and potential for bioenergy production are studied. Then, the Dry-AD process parameters, advantages, and challenges are described.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2019
Keywords
Industrial crops, Lignocellulosic residue, Crop waste, Solid-state anaerobic digestion, Bioenergy
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15612 (URN)10.1016/j.indcrop.2018.12.051 (DOI)2-s2.0-85058774705 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved
Duan, Y., Awasthi, S. K., Chen, H., Liu, T., Zhang, Z., Zhang, L., . . . Taherzadeh, M. J. (2019). Evaluating the impact of bamboo biochar on the fungal community succession during chicken manure composting. Bioresource Technology, 272, 308-314
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating the impact of bamboo biochar on the fungal community succession during chicken manure composting
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 272, p. 308-314Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this study was to investigate the fungal community succession and variations in chicken manure (CM) compost with different concentration of bamboo biochar (BB) as additive via the using of metagenomics method. The consequent obviously revealed that Chytridiomycota, Mucoromycota, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota were the dominant phylum, while Batrachochytrium, Funneliformis, Mucor, Phizophagus and Pyronema were the pre-dominant genera in each treatment. Redundancy analyses indicated that higher dosage of biochar applied treatments has significant correlation between fungal communities and environmental factors. The diversity of fungal community was analogous but the relative abundance (RA) was inconsistent among the all treatments. In addition, the principal component analysis was also confirmed that T5 and T6 treatments have considerably correlation than other treatments. However, the mean value of RA remained maximum in higher dosage of biochar blended treatments. Ultimately, the RA of different fungal genus and species were influenced in CM compost by the BB amendment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Bamboo biochar, Chicken manure, Fungal community, Relative abundance, Compost
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15615 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2018.10.045 (DOI)000451625700040 ()2-s2.0-85055579658 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved
Chandolias, K., Pekgenc, E. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2019). Floating membrane bioreactors with high gas hold-up for syngas-to-biomethane conversion. Energies, 12(6)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Floating membrane bioreactors with high gas hold-up for syngas-to-biomethane conversion
2019 (English)In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 12, no 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The low gas-to-liquid mass transfer rate is one of the main challenges in syngas biomethanation. In this work, a new concept of the floating membrane system with high gas hold-up was introduced in order to enhance the mass transfer rate of the process. In addition, the effect of the inoculum-to-syngas ratio was investigated. The experiments were conducted at 55 °C with an anaerobic mixed culture in both batch and continuous modes. According to the results from the continuous experiments, the H2 and CO conversion rates in the floating membrane bioreactor were approximately 38% and 28% higher in comparison to the free (suspended) cell bioreactors. The doubling of the thickness of the membrane bed resulted in an increase of the conversion rates of H2 and CO by approximately 6% and 12%, respectively. The highest H2 and CO consumption rates and CH4 production rate recorded were approximately 22 mmol/(L·d), 50 mmol/(L·d), and 34.41 mmol/(L·d), respectively, obtained at the highest inoculum-to-syngas ratio of 0.2 g/mL. To conclude, the use of the floating membrane system enhanced the syngas biomethanation rates, while a thicker membrane bed resulted in even higher syngas conversion rates. Moreover, the increase of the inoculum-to-syngas ratio of up to 0.2 g/mL favored the syngas conversion.

Keywords
floating MBR, syngas-to-biomethane conversion, high gas hold-up, inoculum-to-syngas ratio
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15883 (URN)10.3390/en12061046 (DOI)000464494700007 ()2-s2.0-85065448276 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4887-2433

Search in DiVA

Show all publications