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Taherzadeh, Mohammad JORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4887-2433
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Publications (10 of 319) Show all publications
Lennartsson, P. R., Ferreira, J. A., Taherzadeh, M. J., Lundin, M. & Gmoser, R. (2018). Pigment Production by the Edible Filamentous Fungus Neurospora Intermedia. Fermentation, 4(11), 1-15.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pigment Production by the Edible Filamentous Fungus Neurospora Intermedia
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2018 (English)In: Fermentation, ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 4, no 11, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The production of pigments by edible filamentous fungi is gaining attention as a result of the increased interest in natural sources with added functionality in the food, feed, cosmetic, pharmaceutical and textile industries. The filamentous fungus Neurospora intermedia, used for production of the Indonesian food “oncom”, is one potential source of pigments. The objective of the study was to evaluate the fungus’ pigment production. The joint effect from different factors (carbon and nitrogen source, ZnCl2, MgCl2 and MnCl2) on pigment production by N. intermedia is reported for the first time. The scale-up to 4.5 L bubble column bioreactors was also performed to investigate the effect of pH and aeration. Pigment production of the fungus was successfully manipulated by varying several factors. The results showed that the formation of pigments was strongly influenced by light, carbon, pH, the co-factor Zn2+ and first- to fourth-order interactions between factors. The highest pigmentation (1.19 ± 0.08 mg carotenoids/g dry weight biomass) was achieved in a bubble column reactor. This study provides important insights into pigmentation of this biotechnologically important fungus and lays a foundation for future utilizations of N. intermedia for pigment production. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: , 2018
Keyword
pigments; neurospora intermedia; carotenoids; edible filamentous fungi; ascomycetes
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13654 (URN)10.3390/fermentation4010011 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-02-14 Created: 2018-02-14 Last updated: 2018-02-15Bibliographically approved
Pagés Díaz, J., Pereda Reyes, I., Sanz, J. L., Lundin, M., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Sárvári Horváth, I. (2017). A comparison of process performance during the anaerobic mono-and co-digestion of slaughter house waste through different operational modes. Journal of Environmental Sciences(China).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison of process performance during the anaerobic mono-and co-digestion of slaughter house waste through different operational modes
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Sciences(China), ISSN 1001-0742, E-ISSN 1878-7320Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Abstract [en]

The use of consecutive feeding was applied to investigate the response of the microbial biomass to a second addition of substrates in terms of biodegradation using batch tests as a promising alternative to predict the behavior of the process. Anaerobic digestion (AD) of the slaughterhouse waste (SB) and its co-digestion with manure (M), various crops (VC), and municipal solid waste were evaluated. The results were then correlated to previous findings obtained by the authors for similar mixtures in batch and semi-continuous operation modes. AD of the SB failed showing total inhibition after a second feeding. Co-digestion of the SB + M showed a significant improvement for all of the response variables investigated after the second feeding, while co-digestion of the SB + VC resulted in a decline in all of these response variables. Similar patterns were previously detected, during both the batch and the semi-continuous modes.

Keyword
Co-digestion, Biomethane potential test, Second feeding, Specific methanogenic activity, Slaughterhouse waste
National Category
Bioenergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13561 (URN)10.1016/j.jes.2017.06.004 (DOI)2-s2.0-85021321465 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-17 Created: 2018-01-17 Last updated: 2018-01-18Bibliographically approved
Ferreira, J. A., Lennartsson, P. R. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2017). Airlift bioreactors for fish feed fungal biomass production using edible filamentous fungi. In: FFBiotech Symposium, University of Lille, Villeneuve d'Ascq, France: . Paper presented at FFBiotech Symposium, Villeneuve d'Ascq, May 15-16, 2017. .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Airlift bioreactors for fish feed fungal biomass production using edible filamentous fungi
2017 (English)In: FFBiotech Symposium, University of Lille, Villeneuve d'Ascq, France, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12527 (URN)
Conference
FFBiotech Symposium, Villeneuve d'Ascq, May 15-16, 2017
Available from: 2017-08-27 Created: 2017-08-27 Last updated: 2017-09-28Bibliographically approved
Ferreira, J. A., Lennartsson, P. R. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2017). Airlift bioreactors for fish feed fungal biomass production using edible filamentous fungi. In: : . Paper presented at FFBiotech Symposium, Villeneuve, May 15-16, 2017. .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Airlift bioreactors for fish feed fungal biomass production using edible filamentous fungi
2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Airlift bioreactors are generally considered to be better alternatives for cultivation of filamentous fungi in comparison to stirred-tank bioreactors or bubble columns bioreactors. The reason for the former includes fungal growth around all internal parts including impellers, baffles or pH, temperature and oxygen probes limiting mass transfer, whereas the latter is limited by air flow rates that can be applied before the system provides deficient mixing and so mass transfer rates. Spent sulphite liquor, a by-product from the paper pulp industry, was used for cultivation of edible Rhizopus sp., a strain isolated from Indonesian tempeh used as human food, using a 26 L airlift bioreactor. Increasing the aeration rate from 0.15 to 1 vvm led to increased biomass production (1 vs 7 g/L). The aeration rate was also found to influence fungal morphology and metabolite production during batch cultivation. Rhizopus sp. shifted from mycelial suspensions at 0.15 and 0.5 vvm to small compact pellets of regular size at 1 vvm. The production of ethanol and lactic acid, a proof of sub-optimal aeration conditions, was also reduced when increasing the aeration rate from 0.15 to 1 vvm. The produced biomass was found to be composed, on a dry weight basis, of 30-50% protein, 2-7% lipids, and 3-9% glucosamine. Considering the edible character of the fungus used as well as its biomass nutritional characteristics, there is a potential for its use as fishmeal replacement within the increasing aquaculture sector.

Keyword
Biomass, Edible filamentous fungi, Rhizopus sp
National Category
Chemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12205 (URN)
Conference
FFBiotech Symposium, Villeneuve, May 15-16, 2017
Available from: 2017-06-07 Created: 2017-06-07 Last updated: 2017-11-09Bibliographically approved
Wainaina, S., Sárvári Horváth, I. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2017). Biochemicals from food waste and recalcitrant biomass via syngas fermentation: A review. Bioresource Technology.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biochemicals from food waste and recalcitrant biomass via syngas fermentation: A review
2017 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An effective method for the production of value-added chemicals from food waste and lignocellulosic materials is a hybrid thermal-biological process, which involves gasification of the solid materials to syngas (primarily CO and H2) followed by fermentation. This paper reviews the recent advances in this process. The special focus is on the cultivation methods that involve the use of single strains, defined mixed cultures and undefined mixed cultures for production of carboxylic acids and higher alcohols. A rate limiting step in these processes is the low mass transfer between the gas and the liquid phases. Therefore, novel techniques that can enhance the gas-liquid mass transfer including membrane- and trickle-bed bioreactors were discussed. Such bioreactors have shown promising results in increasing the volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kLa). High gas pressure also influences the mass transfer in certain batch processes, although the presence of impurities in the gas would impede the process.[on SciFinder (R)]

Keyword
co-cultures, food waste, lignocelluloses, reactor design, syngas fermentation
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12538 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2017.06.075 (DOI)28651875 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85018660866 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-27 Created: 2017-08-27 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Mohsenzadeh, A., Zamani, A. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2017). Bioethylene Production from Ethanol: A Review and Techno-economical Evaluation.. Challenges in Sustainability, 4(2), 75-91.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioethylene Production from Ethanol: A Review and Techno-economical Evaluation.
2017 (English)In: Challenges in Sustainability, ISSN 2196-0216, E-ISSN 2196-9744, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 75-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Manufg. of bioethylene via dehydration of bioethanol is an alternative to the fossil-based ethylene prodn. and decreases the environmental consequences for this chem. commodity. A few industrial plants that utilize 1st generation bioethanol for the bioethylene prodn. already exist, although not functioning without subsidiaries. However, there is still no process producing ethylene from 2nd generation bioethanol. This study is divided into two parts. Different ethanol and ethylene prodn. methods, the process specifications and current technologies are briefly discussed in the first part. In the second part, a techno-economic anal. of a bioethylene plant was performed using Aspen plus and Aspen Process Economic Analyzer, where different qualities of ethanol were considered. The results show that impurities in the ethanol feed have no significant effect on the quality of the produced polymer-grade bioethylene. The capacity of the ethylene storage tank significantly affects the capital costs of the process. [on SciFinder(R)]

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, 2017
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12535 (URN)10.1002/cben.201600025 (DOI)000399898600001 ()
Note

Copyright (C) 2017 American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved.; CAPLUS AN 2017:676784(Journal; Online Computer File)

Available from: 2017-08-27 Created: 2017-08-27 Last updated: 2017-09-28Bibliographically approved
Brancoli, P., Ferreira, J. A., Bolton, K. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2017). Changes in carbon footprint when integrating production of filamentous fungi in 1st generation ethanol plants. Bioresource Technology.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in carbon footprint when integrating production of filamentous fungi in 1st generation ethanol plants
2017 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Abstract [en]

Integrating the cultivation of edible filamentous fungi in the thin stillage from ethanol production is presently being considered. This integration can increase the ethanol yield while simultaneously producing a new value-added protein-rich biomass that can be used for animal feed. This study uses life cycle assessment to determine the change in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions when integrating the cultivation of filamentous fungi in ethanol production. The result shows that the integration performs better than the current scenario when the fungal biomass is used as cattle feed for system expansion and when energy allocation is used. It performs worse if the biomass is used as fish feed. Hence, integrating the cultivation of filamentous fungi in 1st generation ethanol plants combined with proper use of the fungi can lead to a reduction of GHG emissions which, considering the number of existing ethanol plants, can have a significant global impact.

Keyword
Carbon footprint, Feed products, Life cycle assessment, Ethanol
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13418 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2017.10.085 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Mahboubi, A., Ylitervo, P., Doyen, W., De Wever, H., Molenberghs, B. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2017). Continuous bioethanol fermentation from wheat straw hydrolysate with high suspended solid content using an immersed flat sheet membrane bioreactor.. Bioresource Technology, 241, 296-308.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Continuous bioethanol fermentation from wheat straw hydrolysate with high suspended solid content using an immersed flat sheet membrane bioreactor.
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2017 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 241, p. 296-308Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Finding a technol. approach that eases the prodn. of lignocellulosic bioethanol has long been considered as a great industrial challenge. In the current study a membrane bioreactor (MBR) set-up using integrated permeate channel (IPC) membrane panels was used to simultaneously ferment pentose and hexose sugars to ethanol in continuous fermn. of high suspended solid wheat straw hydrolyzate. The MBR was optimized to flawlessly operated at high SS concns. of up to 20% without any significant changes in the permeate flux and transmembrane pressure. By the help of the retained high cell concn., the yeast cells were capable of tolerating and detoxifying the inhibitory medium and succeeded to co-consume all glucose and up to 83% of xylose in a continuous fermn. mode leading to up to 83% of the theor. ethanol yield. [on SciFinder(R)]

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd., 2017
Keyword
Membrane bioreactor, Lignocellulose, Bioethanol, Continuous fermentation
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12531 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2017.05.125 (DOI)000405502400037 ()85020039248 (Scopus ID)
Note

Copyright (C) 2017 American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved.; CAPLUS AN 2017:885722(Journal; Online Computer File)

Available from: 2017-08-27 Created: 2017-08-27 Last updated: 2017-09-28Bibliographically approved
Patinvoh, R., Osadolor, O. A., Sárvári Horváth, I. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2017). Cost effective dry anaerobic digestion in textile bioreactors: Experimental and economic evaluation. Bioresource Technology, 245(Pt A), 549-555.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cost effective dry anaerobic digestion in textile bioreactors: Experimental and economic evaluation
2017 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 245, no Pt A, p. 549-555Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this work was to study dry anaerobic digestion (dry-AD) of manure bedded with straw using textile-based bioreactor in repeated batches. The 90-L reactor filled with the feedstocks (22-30% total solid) and inoculum without any further treatment, while the biogas produced were collected and analyzed. The digestate residue was also analyzed to check its suitability as bio-fertilizer. Methane yield after acclimatization increased from 183 to 290NmlCH4/gVS, degradation time decreased from 136 to 92days and the digestate composition point to suitable bio-fertilizer. The results then used to carry out economical evaluation, which shows dry-AD in textile bioreactors is a profitable method of handling the waste with maximum payback period of 5years, net present value from $7,000 to $9,800,000 (small to large bioreactors) with internal rate of return from 56.6 to 19.3%.

Keyword
Dry anaerobic digestion, Textile bioreactor, Solid waste management, Digestate, Economic evaluation
National Category
Bioenergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13560 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2017.08.081 (DOI)000412443500069 ()28898855 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85028966233 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-17 Created: 2018-01-17 Last updated: 2018-01-18Bibliographically approved
Patinvoh, R., Kalantar Mehrjerdi, A., Sárvári Horváth, I. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2017). Dry fermentation of manure with straw in continuous plug flow reactor: Reactor development and process stability at different loading rates. Bioresource Technology, 224, 197-205.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dry fermentation of manure with straw in continuous plug flow reactor: Reactor development and process stability at different loading rates
2017 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 224, p. 197-205Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this work, a plug flow reactor was developed for continuous dry digestion processes and its efficiency was investigated using untreated manure bedded with straw at 22% total solids content. This newly developed reactor worked successfully for 230days at increasing organic loading rates of 2.8, 4.2 and 6gVS/L/d and retention times of 60, 40 and 28days, respectively. Organic loading rates up to 4.2gVS/L/d gave a better process stability, with methane yields up to 0.163LCH4/gVSadded/d which is 56% of the theoretical yield. Further increase of organic loading rate to 6gVS/L/d caused process instability with lower volatile solid removal efficiency and cellulose degradation.[on SciFinder (R)]

Keyword
continuous process, dry fermentation, plug flow reactor, process stability, reactor development
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12543 (URN)000395691900024 ()85006434786 (Scopus ID)
Note

Copyright (C) 2017 U.S. National Library of Medicine.; MEDLINE AN 2017659917(Journal; Article; (JOURNAL ARTICLE))

Available from: 2017-08-27 Created: 2017-08-27 Last updated: 2017-09-29Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4887-2433

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