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Taherzadeh, Mohammad JORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4887-2433
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Publications (10 of 414) Show all publications
Wainaina, S., Mukesh Kumar, A., Sárvári Horváth, I. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2020). Anaerobic digestion of food waste to volatile fatty acids and hydrogen at high organic loading rates in immersed membrane bioreactors. Renewable energy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anaerobic digestion of food waste to volatile fatty acids and hydrogen at high organic loading rates in immersed membrane bioreactors
2020 (English)In: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The organic loading rate (OLR) is an essential parameter that controls the anaerobic digestion process. This work investigated the performance of immersed membrane bioreactors operated at high OLRs of 4, 6, 8 and 10 g volatile solids (VS)/L/d regarding the fermentation behavior, product recovery and microbial dynamics during the acidogenic fermentation of food waste to volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and hydrogen. The highest yield of 0.52 g VFA/ gVSadded was attained at 6 g VS/L/d, while an optimal hydrogen yield of 14.7 NmL/ gVSadded was obtained at 8 g VS/L/d. The bacterial populations, analyzed using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, consisted mainly of Firmicutes and Actinobacteria at OLRs 4 and 8 g VS/L/d while Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria phyla dominated at 6 and 10 g VS/L/d. Moreover, the presence of Clostridium and Lactobacillus genera correlated with the acetate, butyrate, caproate and lactate production.

Keywords
In-situ product recovery Immersed membrane bioreactor High organic loading rate Volatile fatty acids Microbial dynamics
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22766 (URN)10.1016/j.renene.2020.01.138 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Agency for Economic and Regional GrowthMoRe ResearchSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2020-02-03 Created: 2020-02-03 Last updated: 2020-02-24Bibliographically approved
Lukitawesa, ., Patinvoh, R., Millati, R., Sárvári Horváth, I. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2020). Factors influencing volatile fatty acids production from food wastes via anaerobic digestion. Bioengineered, 11(1), 39-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors influencing volatile fatty acids production from food wastes via anaerobic digestion
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2020 (English)In: Bioengineered, ISSN 2165-5979, E-ISSN 2165-5987, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 39-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are intermediate products in anaerobic digestion. The effect of substrate loading or inoculum to substrate ratio (ISR), the addition of methanogen inhibitor, O2 presence, control the reactor's pH, and inoculum adaptation on the VFAs production from food waste through acidogenesis process was investigated in this study. Addition of 2-bromoethane sulfonic (BES) as methanogen inhibitor suppressed VFA consumption by methanogens at ISR 1:1. At higher substrate loading (ISR 1:3), methane production can be suppressed even without the addition of BES. However, at high substrate loading, controlling the pH during acidogenesis is important to achieve high VFAs yield. Acclimatization of inoculum is also one of the strategies to achieve high VFA yield. The highest VFAs yield obtained in this work was 0.8 g VFA/g VS added at ISR 1:3, controlled pH at 6, with the presence of initial O2 (headspace unflushed).

Keywords
Inoculum to substrate ratio, O2, VFA, anaerobic digestion, inoculum acclimatization, pH control, the inhibitor for methanogens
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22456 (URN)10.1080/21655979.2019.1703544 (DOI)000505130700001 ()31880192 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-16 Created: 2020-01-16 Last updated: 2020-01-17Bibliographically approved
Aktij, S. A., Zirehpour, A., Mollahosseini, A., Taherzadeh, M. J., Tiraferri, A. & Rahimpour, A. (2020). Feasibility of membrane processes for the recovery and purification of bio-based volatile fatty acids: A comprehensive review. Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, 81, 24-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feasibility of membrane processes for the recovery and purification of bio-based volatile fatty acids: A comprehensive review
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, ISSN 1226-086X, E-ISSN 1876-794X, Vol. 81, p. 24-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) can be produced from fermentation/anaerobic digestion of wastes and are a valuable substrate for numerous applications, such as those related to the food, tanning, petrochemicals, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and chemicals industry. They are also inexpensive raw materials for developing alternative sources of energy. However, the separation and purification of VFAs produced from fermented wastewaters are not straightforward goals, due to the low concentration of these compounds in the fermentation broths and owing to the complexity of these mixtures. Cost-effective and sustainable technologies must be developed to recover VFAs efficiently and allow their beneficial use. In this paper, a comprehensive review of VFAs recovery/purification methods is provided, with focus on membrane-based processes. First, the VFAs production methods, application, and conventional processes (distillation, precipitation, adsorption, and extraction) for their recovery are briefly reviewed. Then, the ability of various membrane-based techniques to separate and purify VFAs are evaluated and discussed in detail. This discussion includes the processes of microfiltration/ultrafiltration, nanofiltration, reverse osmosis, forward osmosis, membrane distillation, electrodialysis, membrane contractor, and pervaporation. Extensive background and examples of applications are also provided to show the effectiveness of membrane processes. Finally, challenges and future research directions are highlighted.

Keywords
Bio-based volatile fatty acids, Membrane processes, Purification, Separation
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22455 (URN)10.1016/j.jiec.2019.09.009 (DOI)000501660000003 ()2-s2.0-85072525770 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-01-16 Created: 2020-01-16 Last updated: 2020-01-17Bibliographically approved
Mahboubi, A., Uwineza, C., Doyen, W., De Wever, H. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2020). Intensification of lignocellulosic bioethanol production process using continuous double-staged immersed membrane bioreactors. Bioresource Technology, 296
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intensification of lignocellulosic bioethanol production process using continuous double-staged immersed membrane bioreactors
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2020 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 296Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Processing complexities associated with different lignocellulosic bioethanol production stages have hindered reaching full commercial capacity. Therefore, in this study efforts were made to remediate some issues associated with hydrolysis and fermentation, by the integration of immersed membrane bioreactors (iMBRs) into lignocellulosic bioethanol production process. In this regards, double-staged continuous saccharification-filtration and co-fermentation-filtration of wheat straw slurry was conducted using iMBRs at filtration fluxes up to 51.0 l.m-2.h-1 (LMH). The results showed a stable long-term (264 h) continuous hydrolysis-filtration and fermentation-filtration with effective separation of lignin-rich solids (up to 70% lignin) from hydrolyzed sugars, and separation of yeast cells from bioethanol stream at an exceptional filtration performance at 21.9 LMH. Moreover, the effect of factors such as filtration flux, medium quality and backwashing on fouling and cake-layer formation was studied. The results confirmed the process intensification potentials of iMBRs in tackling commonly faced technical obstacles in lignocellulosic bioethanol production.

Keywords
Immersed membrane bioreactors, Lignocellulosic bioethanol, Membrane fouling, Process intensification
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22457 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2019.122314 (DOI)000500462400034 ()31671329 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-16 Created: 2020-01-16 Last updated: 2020-01-17Bibliographically approved
Vu, H. D., Åkesson, D., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Ferreira, J. (2020). Recycling strategies for polyhydroxyalkanoate-based waste materials: An overview.. Bioresource Technology, 298, Article ID 122393.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recycling strategies for polyhydroxyalkanoate-based waste materials: An overview.
2020 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 298, article id 122393Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The plastics market is dominated by fossil-based polymers, but their gradual replacement by bioplastics (e.g., polyhydroxyalkanoates) is occurring. However, recycling strategies need to be developed to truly unveil the impact of bioplastics on waste accumulation. This review provides a state of the art of recycling strategies investigated for polyhydroxyalkanoate-based polymers and proposes future research avenues. Research on mechanical and chemical recycling is dominated by the use of extrusion and pyrolysis, respectively, while that on biodegradation of polyhydroxyalkanoates is related to soil and aquatic samples, and to anaerobic digestion towards biogas production. Research gaps exist in the relationships between polymer composition and ease of use of all recycling strategies investigated. This is of utmost importance since it will influence the need for separation at the source. Therefore, research emphasis needs to be given to the area to follow the continuous improvement of the process economics towards widespread commercial production of polyhydroxyalkanoates.

Keywords
Biodegradation, Extraction methods, Polyhydroxyalkanoates, Recycling methods, Wastes
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22508 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2019.122393 (DOI)000505201600041 ()31757612 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-16 Created: 2020-01-16 Last updated: 2020-01-17Bibliographically approved
Wainaina, S., Mukesh Kumar, A., Sarsaiya, S., Chen, H., Singh, E., Kumar, A., . . . Taherzadeh, M. J. (2020). Resource recovery and circular economy from organic solid waste using aerobic and anaerobic digestion technologies. Bioresource Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resource recovery and circular economy from organic solid waste using aerobic and anaerobic digestion technologies
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2020 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With the inevitable rise in human population, resource recovery from waste stream is becoming important for a sustainable economy, conservation of the ecosystem as well as for reducing the dependence on the finite natural resources. In this regard, a bio-based circular economy considers organic wastes and residues as potential resources that can be utilized to supply chemicals, nutrients, and fuels needed by mankind. This review explored the role of aerobic and anaerobic digestion technologies for the advancement of a bio-based circular society. The developed routes within the anaerobic digestion domain, such as the production of biogas and other high-value chemicals (volatile fatty acids) were discussed. The potential to recover important nutrients, such as nitrogen through composting, was also addressed. An emphasis was made on the innovative models for improved economics and process performance, which include co-digestion of various organic solid wastes, recovery of multiple bio-products, and integrated bioprocesses.

Keywords
Resource recovery, Organic solid waste, Circular economy, Anaerobic digestion, Composting
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22767 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2020.122778 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-02-03 Created: 2020-02-03 Last updated: 2020-02-24Bibliographically approved
Wainaina, S., Kisworini, A. D., Fanani, M., Wikandari, R., Millati, R., Niklasson, C. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2020). Utilization of food waste-derived volatile fatty acids for production of edible Rhizopus oligosporus fungal biomass. Bioresource Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Utilization of food waste-derived volatile fatty acids for production of edible Rhizopus oligosporus fungal biomass
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2020 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rhizopus oligosporus is an edible filamentous fungus that can contribute to meet the growing demand for single-cell protein. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are favorable potential substrates for producing R. oligosporus biomass due to their capacity to be synthesized from a wide range of low-value organic solid wastes via anaerobic digestion. The goal of this work was to cultivate R. oligosporus using food waste-derived VFAs as the sole carbon source. To maintain the requisite low substrate concentrations, the fed-batch cultivation technique was applied. This resulted in a four-fold improvement in biomass production relative to standard batch cultivation. Maximum biomass yield of 0.21 ± 0.01 g dry biomass/g VFAs COD eq. consumed, containing 39.28 ± 1.54% crude protein, was obtained. In the bubble-column bioreactors, the complete uptake of acetic acid was observed, while the consumptions of caproic and butyric acids reached up to 97.64% and 26.13%, respectively.

Keywords
Food waste; Anaerobic digestion; Volatile fatty acids; Fed-batch cultivation; Edible filamentous fungal biomass; Rhizopus oligosporus
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-23158 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2020.123444 (DOI)2-s2.0-85083785704 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Agency for Economic and Regional Growth
Available from: 2020-04-28 Created: 2020-04-28 Last updated: 2020-05-04Bibliographically approved
Mukesh Kumar, A., Sarsaiya, S., Wainaina, S., Rajendran, K., Kumar, S., Quan, W., . . . Jain, A. (2019). A critical review of organic manure biorefinery models toward sustainable circular bioeconomy: Technological challenges, advancements, innovations, and future perspectives. Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, 115-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A critical review of organic manure biorefinery models toward sustainable circular bioeconomy: Technological challenges, advancements, innovations, and future perspectives
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2019 (English)In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, p. 115-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Total livestock emissions account for up to 14.5% of man-made greenhouse gas emissions. Counteractive measures, such as circular economy concepts and negative emission technologies are necessary to limit global warming below 1.5 °C. Possible treatment options for organic manure include anaerobic digestion, combustion, gasification, hydrothermal liquefaction and composting. The choice of treatment varies depending on the economics, the requirement of a specific product, and sociocultural factors. Commercialization of these treatments needs a blend of appropriate technology, feasible economics, policy support and agreeable socio-cultural conditions. Key findings of this study include the following: 1. Increasing scientific awareness about manure management and treatment; 2. Building a sustainable cooperative model to commercialize technologies; 3. Creating a market for manure recycling products; 4. The role of policy in supporting technologies and consumers; and 5. The codigestion of substrates for better efficacy. Current trends show minimal actions in place as opposed to the high-rate of acceleration that is necessary.

Keywords
Anaerobic digestion, Organic manure, Pretreatment, Codigestion, Organic loading rate, Bioaugmentation
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21039 (URN)10.1016/j.rser.2019.05.017 (DOI)000471252700009 ()2-s2.0-85065677454 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Shahryari, Z., Fazaelipoor, M. H., Ghasemi, Y., Lennartsson, P. R. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2019). Amylase and Xylanase from Edible Fungus Neurospora intermedia: Production and Characterization. Molecules, 24(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Amylase and Xylanase from Edible Fungus Neurospora intermedia: Production and Characterization
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2019 (English)In: Molecules, ISSN 1420-3049, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 24, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Integrated enzyme production in the biorefinery can significantly reduce the cost of the entire process. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the production of two hydrolyzing enzymes (amylase and xylanase) by an edible fungus used in the biorefinery, Neurospora intermedia. The enzyme production was explored through submerged fermentation of synthetic media and a wheat-based waste stream (thin stillage and wheat bran). The influence of a nitrogen source on N. intermedia was investigated and a combination of NaNO3 and yeast extract has been identified as the best nitrogen source for extracellular enzyme production. N. intermedia enzymes showed maximum activity at 65 degrees C and pH around 5. Under these conditions, the maximum velocity of amylase and xylanase for starch and xylan hydrolysis was found to be 3.25 U mL(-1) and 14.77 U mL(-1), respectively. Cultivation of N. intermedia in thin stillage and wheat bran medium resulted in relatively high amylase (8.86 +/- 0.41 U mL(-1), 4.68 +/- 0.23) and xylanase (5.48 +/- 0.21, 2.58 +/- 0.07 U mL(-1)) production, respectively, which makes this fungus promising for enzyme production through a wheat-based biorefinery.

Keywords
amylase, xylanase, Neurospora intermedia, submerged fermentation, wheat-based biorefinery
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21530 (URN)10.3390/molecules24040721 (DOI)000460805900067 ()2-s2.0-85061562758 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-07
Yudianto, D., Nainggolan, E. A., Millati, R., Hidayat, C., Lennartsson, P. R., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Niklasson, C. (2019). Bioconversion of pretreated wheat straw to ethanol by monascus purpureus CBS 109.07 and fusarium venenatum ATCC 20334 using simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. Biodiversitas, 20(8), 2229-2235
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioconversion of pretreated wheat straw to ethanol by monascus purpureus CBS 109.07 and fusarium venenatum ATCC 20334 using simultaneous saccharification and fermentation
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2019 (English)In: Biodiversitas, ISSN 1412-033X, E-ISSN 2085-4722, Biodiversitas, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 2229-2235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22393 (URN)10.13057/biodiv/d200817 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-01-09 Created: 2020-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-14Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4887-2433

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