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Moshtaghian, Hanieh
Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Hellwig, C., Moshtaghian, H., Persson, D., Bolton, K., Rousta, K. & Häggblom-Kronlöf, G. (2024). Glocal and ecoethical perceptions of engagement with fungi-based food. Journal of Cleaner Production, 440, Article ID 140898.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Glocal and ecoethical perceptions of engagement with fungi-based food
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 440, article id 140898Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fungal fermentation is a promising strategy to secure affordable, nutritious and sustainable food. Encouraging engagement with fungi-based food is crucial to contribute to social, economic, and environmental sustainability. Reflections can trigger a sense of meaning in engaging in activities and with resources. The aim of this mixed methods study was to explore perceptions of whether participants think their own engagement with fungi-based food is consequential. To do so, the study explored ecoethical reflections relating to whether participants thought engaging with fungi-based food is beneficial or not beneficial for the environment. This study also explored glocal reflections of whether participants thought their own engagement with this kind of food is beneficial or not beneficial in ways that extend to people around them (i.e., local population) or people in other parts of the world (i.e., global population). N = 160 participants completed questionnaires. Most participants expressed a positive outlook, believing that embracing fungi-based food could promote increased sustainability and overall well-being for humans and the environment in numerous different ways. The perceptions that participants shared can affect and trigger conscious engagement with fungi-based food locally with awareness of its global impact which, in turn, can promote well-being for individuals and extend to the population level and thereby contribute to efforts at archiving sustainable development. Nevertheless, the findings highlight a necessity for more information to enable individuals to engage in knowledgeable reflections and, ultimately, act upon their values and what is meaningful to them. The results are important for future development and conceptualization of not only fungi-based food but also other food that is expected to contribute to sustainable development.

Keywords
Filamentous fungi, Future food, Sustainability, Circular economy, Food security, Resource recovery
National Category
Other Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-31597 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2024.140898 (DOI)001175314900001 ()
Funder
European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), 20201656Swedish Agency for Economic and Regional Growth, 10.13039/501100012380
Note

Funding: European Cooperation in Science and Technology 10.13039/501100000921

Available from: 2024-02-20 Created: 2024-02-20 Last updated: 2024-05-27Bibliographically approved
Moshtaghian, H., Bolton, K. & Rousta, K. (2024). Upcycled food choice motives and their association with hesitancy towards consumption of this type of food: a Swedish study. British Food Journal, 126(1), 48-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Upcycled food choice motives and their association with hesitancy towards consumption of this type of food: a Swedish study
2024 (English)In: British Food Journal, ISSN 0007-070X, E-ISSN 1758-4108, Vol. 126, no 1, p. 48-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

This study investigates factors motivating upcycled food choices and assesses the association between these factors and hesitancy towards upcycled food consumption in a Swedish population.

Design/methodology/approach

An online food choice questionnaire was used. Participants (n = 682) were categorised into Inclined and Hesitant groups based on their intention to consume upcycled foods. The factors motivating upcycled food choices were identified using explanatory factor analyses. Independent t-tests assessed the differences in the mean importance score of factors between the two groups. The association between upcycled food choice factors and hesitancy towards consumption was evaluated by logistic regressions (adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics).

Findings

The most important upcycled food choice factor in both groups was ethical concerns, followed by natural content, sensory appeal, price, healthiness, familiarity and impression. The Inclined group's mean importance score for ethical concern was higher than the Hesitant group (p(value)<0.001) and, except for natural content, the mean importance scores for the other factors were higher in the Hesitant group compared to the Inclined group (p(value)<0.05). Participants who perceived ethical concern as an important factor had lower odds of hesitancy (Odds ratio = 0.39; 95%CI:0.26,0.59; p(value)<0.001), and those who considered sensory appeal an important factor had higher odds of hesitancy (Odds ratio = 2.42; 95%CI:1.62,3.63; p(value)<0.001) towards upcycled food consumption compared to participants who did not consider these as important factors.

Originality/value

This is the first study investigating health and non-health-related upcycled food choice motives using a food choice questionnaire. Identifying these motives helps food developers and researchers determine factors influencing upcycled food consumption.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2024
Keywords
Upcycled food, Waste to value food, Value-added surplus food, Food choice motives, Upcycled food acceptability
National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-29417 (URN)10.1108/bfj-09-2022-0757 (DOI)000914019500001 ()2-s2.0-85146397803 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: This work was supported by the SparbankstiftelsenSjuhärd research grant.

Available from: 2023-02-06 Created: 2023-02-06 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Moshtaghian, H., Bolton, K. & Rousta, K. (2023). Public preferences for nutritional, environmental and food safety characteristics of upcycled foods in Sweden. International journal of food science & technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Public preferences for nutritional, environmental and food safety characteristics of upcycled foods in Sweden
2023 (English)In: International journal of food science & technology, ISSN 0950-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2621Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study investigates people's preferences for nutritional, environmental and food safety characteristics of upcycled foods according to their age group and assesses the association between age and the importance of these characteristics in a Swedish population. A food choice questionnaire was used for data collection, and 681 Swedish residents aged ≥18 years participated in this study. In young, middle-aged and older adults, environmental (environmentally friendly preparation and packaging, local production and contribution to food waste reduction) and food safety (absence of additives, chemicals, genetically modified ingredients and contamination) characteristics of upcycled foods were more important than most nutritional characteristics (low energy and fat content and high fibre and protein content). There was a positive association between age and the importance score of nutritional characteristics, such as rich in vitamins and minerals, low energy and fat content and minimal food processing (P-value < 0.05). A negative association was observed between age and the importance score of contribution to food waste reduction (P-value = 0.014). There was a positive association between age and the importance score of food safety characteristics, such as the absence of additives, chemicals and genetically modified ingredients (P-value < 0.05). Therefore, the environmental benefits and food safety aspects of upcycled foods can be considered for product development and marketing to facilitate the acceptability of these foods in all age groups. Since the nutritional attributes of upcycled foods were less important than their environmental and food safety characteristics, strategies should be introduced to educate people regarding desirable nutritional features to enable them to choose healthy upcycled foods. 

Keywords
consumer preferences, environmental benefits, food safety, food sustainability, nutritional value, public perception, sustainable consumption, upcycled food
National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-30358 (URN)10.1111/ijfs.16588 (DOI)001045101700001 ()2-s2.0-85167707991 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-21 Created: 2023-08-21 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Moshtaghian, H. (2023). Upcycled food: a strategy for food waste management and a challenge for food choice motives. (Doctoral dissertation). Borås: Högskolan i Borås
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Upcycled food: a strategy for food waste management and a challenge for food choice motives
2023 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Borås: Högskolan i Borås, 2023
Series
Skrifter från Högskolan i Borås, ISSN 0280-381X ; 138
Keywords
upcycled food, waste-to-value food, upcycled food choice motives, upcycled food nutritional characteristics, upcycled food environmental characteristics, upcycled bread
National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-29587 (URN)978-91-89271-96-8 (ISBN)978-91-89271-97-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2023-06-09, C203, Allégatan 1, Borås, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Available from: 2023-05-15 Created: 2023-03-30 Last updated: 2023-05-15Bibliographically approved
Moshtaghian, H., Parchami, M., Rousta, K. & Lennartsson, P. R. (2022). Application of Oyster Mushroom Cultivation Residue as an Upcycled Ingredient for Developing Bread. Applied Sciences, 12(21)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Application of Oyster Mushroom Cultivation Residue as an Upcycled Ingredient for Developing Bread
2022 (English)In: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 12, no 21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Oyster mushroom (OM) cultivation generates residue that needs to be managed; otherwise, it will be converted into waste. One of the substrates for OM cultivation is the food industry by-product, e.g., a mixture of the brewer’s spent grain (BSG) and wheat bran. This study assesses the OM cultivation residue’s physical and nutritional characteristics as a potential upcycled food ingredient and also considers developing bread from this cultivation residue. The OM was cultivated in a mixture of 55% BSG and 45% wheat bran. After the OM harvest, the cultivation residue (mixture of BSG, wheat bran and mycelium) had a lighter colour and a pleasant aroma compared to the initial substrate. It contained protein (10.8%) and had high niacin (42.4 mg/100 g), fibre (59.2%) and beta-glucan (6.6%). Thiamine, riboflavin and pyridoxine were also present in the cultivation residue. The bread was developed from 50% cultivation residue and 50% wheat flour, and its scores for darkness, dryness, sponginess, sour taste, bitter aftertaste, and aromatic aroma differed from white bread (p-value < 0.05). However, its overall acceptability and liking scores were not significantly different from white bread (p-value > 0.05). Therefore, this OM cultivation residue can be used as a nutritious ingredient; nevertheless, product development should be further explored.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus, cultivation residue, brewer’s spent grain, cereal-based food, upcycled food
National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-28990 (URN)10.3390/app122111067 (DOI)000883367300001 ()2-s2.0-85141825603 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-11-29 Created: 2022-11-29 Last updated: 2023-05-11Bibliographically approved
Moshtaghian, H., Bolton, K. & Rousta, K. (2021). Challenges for Upcycled Foods: Definition, Inclusion in the Food Waste Management Hierarchy and Public Acceptability. Foods, 10(11)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges for Upcycled Foods: Definition, Inclusion in the Food Waste Management Hierarchy and Public Acceptability
2021 (English)In: Foods, E-ISSN 2304-8158, Vol. 10, no 11Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Upcycled foods contain unmarketable ingredients (e.g., damaged food produce, by-products and scraps from food preparation) that otherwise would not be directed for human consumption. Upcycled food is a new food category and thus faces several challenges, such as definition development, inclusion in the food waste management hierarchy and public acceptability. This review provides an overview of these three challenges. The upcycled food definitions have been developed for research, food manufacturers, and multi-stakeholders use. Thus, there is a need for a consumer-friendly definition for the general public. A simplified definition is proposed to introduce these foods as environmentally friendly foods containing safe ingredients that otherwise would not have gone to human consumption such as damaged food produce, by-products and scraps from food preparation. Moreover, an updated version of the food waste management hierarchy has been proposed by including the production of upcycled foods as a separate waste management action that is less preferable than redistribution but more favourable than producing animal feed. Furthermore, consumer sociodemographic characteristics and beliefs, as well as food quality cues and attributes, were identified as crucial factors for the public acceptability of these foods. Future research should address these challenges to facilitate the introduction of upcycled foods.

Keywords
upcycled food, waste to value food, value-added surplus food, valorised food, food waste management hierarchy, GLYCEMIC INDEX, TO-VALUE, QUALITY, PRICE, HEALTH, QUANTIFICATION, ATTRIBUTE, CONTEXT, SCALE, APPLE
National Category
Food Science Food Engineering
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-27016 (URN)10.3390/foods10112874 (DOI)000725260400001 ()2-s2.0-85119914645 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-12-13 Created: 2021-12-13 Last updated: 2023-05-11Bibliographically approved
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