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BETA
Lundin, Magnus
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 34) Show all publications
Brancoli, P., Lundin, M., Bolton, K. & Eriksson, M. (2019). Bread loss rates at the supplier-retailer interface – Analysis of risk factors tosupport waste prevention measures. Resources, Conservation and Recycling, 128-136
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bread loss rates at the supplier-retailer interface – Analysis of risk factors tosupport waste prevention measures
2019 (English)In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, p. 128-136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper quantifies bread waste throughout the Swedish supply chain and investigates the loss rate of prepackagedbread products at the supplier-retailer interface. The goal is to understand the extent of bread waste inSweden and to identify risk factors for high quantities of waste at the supplier-retailer interface, in order toprovide information supporting waste prevention measures. The study uses primary data, in combination withnational statistics and data from sustainability reports and the literature. Primary data were collected from 380stores of a Swedish retail company and a bakery. Bread waste was calculated to be 80 410 tons/year in Sweden,the equivalent of 8.1 kg per person/year, and was found to be concentrated at households and in retail, specificallyat the supplier-retailer interface. The results provide evidence that take-back agreements between suppliersand retailers, where the retailer only pays for sold products and the supplier bears the cost of the unsoldproducts and their collection and treatment, are risk factors for high waste generation. Current business modelsmay need to be changed to achieve a more sustainable bread supply chain with less waste.

Keywords
Food waste, Bread, Retail, Take-back agreement, Waste prevention, Reasons
National Category
Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21006 (URN)10.1016/j.resconrec.2019.04.027 (DOI)000471206700013 ()2-s2.0-85065100749 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Supermarket food waste
Available from: 2019-05-07 Created: 2019-05-07 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Jabbari, M., Lundin, M., Bahadorikhalili, S., Skrifvars, M. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2019). Finding solvent for polyamide 11 using a computer software. Zeitschrift für Physikalische Chemie
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Finding solvent for polyamide 11 using a computer software
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2019 (English)In: Zeitschrift für Physikalische Chemie, ISSN 0942-9352Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The solvent finding step has always been a time-consuming job in chemical-involved processes. The source of difficulty mainly comes from the trial-and-errors, as a repetitive process of chosing solvents and mixing them in different proportions. Computers are good at doing repetitive processes; however, they can only deal with numerical values, rather than qulitative scales. Numerification of qualitative parameters (like solubility) has already been introduced. The most recent one is the Hansen solubility parameters (HSPs). Using the HSPs could provide a solvent or solvent-mixture. In our previous study, we introduced a computer-aided model and a software to find a solvent mixture. In this study, we have used the computer-aided solvent selection model to find some solvent mixtures for polyamide 11, a biobased polymer which has attracted enormous attention recently. Using this numerical model significantly diminished the time of solvent development experimentation by decreasing the possible/necessary trials.

Keywords
Hansen solubility parameters, polyamide 11, nylon, solvent mixture, solvent screening, solvent substitution, the Simplex method
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22385 (URN)10.1515/zpch-2018-1299 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-14Bibliographically approved
Bátori, V., Lundin, M., Åkesson, D., Lennartsson, P. R., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Zamani, A. (2019). The Effect of Glycerol, Sugar, and Maleic Anhydride on Pectin-Cellulose Thin Films Prepared from Orange Waste. POLYMERS, 11(3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effect of Glycerol, Sugar, and Maleic Anhydride on Pectin-Cellulose Thin Films Prepared from Orange Waste
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2019 (English)In: POLYMERS, Vol. 11, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study was conducted to improve the properties of thin films prepared from orange waste by the solution casting method. The main focus was the elimination of holes in the film structure by establishing better cohesion between the major cellulosic and pectin fractions. For this, a previously developed method was improved first by the addition of sugar to promote pectin gelling, then by the addition of maleic anhydride. Principally, maleic anhydride was introduced to the films to induce cross-linking within the film structure. The effects of concentrations of sugar and glycerol as plasticizers and maleic anhydride as a cross-linking agent on the film characteristics were studied. Maleic anhydride improved the structure, resulting in a uniform film, and morphology studies showed better adhesion between components. However, it did not act as a cross-linking agent, but rather as a compatibilizer. The middle level (0.78%) of maleic anhydride content resulted in the highest tensile strength (26.65 +/- 3.20 MPa) at low (7%) glycerol and high (14%) sugar levels and the highest elongation (28.48% +/- 4.34%) at high sugar and glycerol levels. To achieve a uniform film surface with no holes present, only the lowest (0.39%) level of maleic anhydride was necessary.

Keywords
bio-based, film, mechanical properties, polysaccharides, resource recovery, solution casting, orange waste
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21529 (URN)10.3390/polym11030392 (DOI)000464512900002 ()2-s2.0-85066752753 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-07
Jabbari, M., Lundin, M., Hatamvand, M., Skrifvars, M. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2018). Computer-aided theoretical solvent selection using the simplex method based on Hansen solubility parameters. Journal of Information Technology & Software Engineering, 8(4), Article ID 1000242.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computer-aided theoretical solvent selection using the simplex method based on Hansen solubility parameters
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Information Technology & Software Engineering, Vol. 8, no 4, article id 1000242Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Solvent selection is a crucial step in all solvent-involved processes. Using the Hansen solubility parameters (HSPs)could provide a solvent/solvent-mixture, but there are two main challenges: 1) What solvents should be selected? 2)From each solvent, how much should be added to the mixture? There is no straightforward way to answer the twochallenging questions. This contribution proposes a computer-aided method for selecting solvents (answer to thequestion 1) and finding the adequate amount of each solvent (answer to the question 2) to form a mixture of 2, 3 or4 solvents to dissolve a solute with known HSPs or to replace a solvent. To achieve this, a sophisticated computersoftware package was developed to find the optimized mixture using the mathematical Simplex algorithm based onHSPs values from a database of 234 solvents. To get a list of solvent-mixtures, polyamide66 was tested using itsHSPs. This technique reduces the laboratory effort required in selecting and screening solvent blends while allowinga large number of candidate solvents to be considered for inclusion in a blend. The outcome of this paper significantlydiminished the time of solvent development experimentation by decreasing the possible/necessary trials. Thus, themost suitable solvent/solvent-substitution can be found by the least possible effort; hence, it will save time and costof all solvent-involved processes in the fields of chemistry, polymer and coating industries, chemical engineering, etc.

Keywords
Hansen solubility parameters; Solvent mixture; Solvent substitution; Simplex method, Linear programming, Quadratic minimization, Solvent screening
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Research subject
Resource Recovery; Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22384 (URN)10.4172/2165-7866.1000242 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-08
Mahboubi, A., Lundin, M., Doyen, W., De Wever, H. & Taherzadeh, M. J. (2018). Diffusion-based reverse membrane bioreactor for simultaneous bioconversion of high-inhibitor xylose-glucose media. Process Biochemistry, 72, 23-30
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diffusion-based reverse membrane bioreactor for simultaneous bioconversion of high-inhibitor xylose-glucose media
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2018 (English)In: Process Biochemistry, ISSN 1359-5113, E-ISSN 1873-3298, Vol. 72, p. 23-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Reverse membrane bioreactor, Concentration gradient, Diffusion rate, Fermentation, Inhibitor detoxification
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15219 (URN)10.1016/j.procbio.2018.06.007 (DOI)000442710600003 ()2-s2.0-85048947972 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-31 Created: 2018-10-31 Last updated: 2019-10-25Bibliographically approved
Patinvoh, R., Lundin, M., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Sárvári Horváth, I. (2018). Dry Anaerobic Co-Digestion of Citrus Wastes with Keratin and Lignocellulosic Wastes: Batch And Continuous Processes. Waste and Biomass Valorization
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dry Anaerobic Co-Digestion of Citrus Wastes with Keratin and Lignocellulosic Wastes: Batch And Continuous Processes
2018 (English)In: Waste and Biomass Valorization, ISSN 1877-2641, E-ISSN 1877-265XArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dry anaerobic co-digestion of citrus wastes (CW) with chicken feather (CF), wheat straw (WS) and manure bedded with straw (MS) was investigated in batch and continuous processes. Experiments were designed with different mixing ratios considering the inhibitory effect of CW, C/N ratio, and total solid content of individual feedstocks. Best mixing ratio (CF:CW:WS:MS) of 1:1:6:0, enhanced methane yield by 14% compared to the expected yield calculated according to the methane yields obtained from the individual fractions. The process performance of this mixture was then investigated in continuous plug flow reactors at different organic loading rates (OLR) with feedstock total solid contents of 21% TS (RTS21) and 32% TS (RTS32). At OLR of 2 gVS/L/d, a methane yield of 362 NmlCH4/gVSadded was obtained from RTS21, which is 13.5% higher than the yield obtained from RTS32 (319 NmlCH4/gVSadded). However, it was not possible to achieve a stable process when the OLR was further increased to 3.8 gVS/L/d; there were increased total VFAs concentrations and a decline in the biogas production.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2018
Keywords
Solid wastes, Dry co-digestion, Batch process, Continuous process, Process performance
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-15640 (URN)10.1007/s12649-018-0447-y (DOI)2-s2.0-85053541114 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07
Lennartsson, P. R., Ferreira, J. A., Taherzadeh, M. J., Lundin, M. & Gmoser, R. (2018). Pigment Production by the Edible Filamentous Fungus Neurospora Intermedia. Fermentation, 4(11), 1-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pigment Production by the Edible Filamentous Fungus Neurospora Intermedia
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2018 (English)In: Fermentation, ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 4, no 11, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The production of pigments by edible filamentous fungi is gaining attention as a result of the increased interest in natural sources with added functionality in the food, feed, cosmetic, pharmaceutical and textile industries. The filamentous fungus Neurospora intermedia, used for production of the Indonesian food “oncom”, is one potential source of pigments. The objective of the study was to evaluate the fungus’ pigment production. The joint effect from different factors (carbon and nitrogen source, ZnCl2, MgCl2 and MnCl2) on pigment production by N. intermedia is reported for the first time. The scale-up to 4.5 L bubble column bioreactors was also performed to investigate the effect of pH and aeration. Pigment production of the fungus was successfully manipulated by varying several factors. The results showed that the formation of pigments was strongly influenced by light, carbon, pH, the co-factor Zn2+ and first- to fourth-order interactions between factors. The highest pigmentation (1.19 ± 0.08 mg carotenoids/g dry weight biomass) was achieved in a bubble column reactor. This study provides important insights into pigmentation of this biotechnologically important fungus and lays a foundation for future utilizations of N. intermedia for pigment production. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: , 2018
Keywords
pigments; neurospora intermedia; carotenoids; edible filamentous fungi; ascomycetes
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13654 (URN)10.3390/fermentation4010011 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-02-14 Created: 2018-02-14 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Pagés Díaz, J., Pereda Reyes, I., Sanz, J. L., Lundin, M., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Sárvári Horváth, I. (2017). A comparison of process performance during the anaerobic mono-and co-digestion of slaughter house waste through different operational modes. Journal of Environmental Sciences(China)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison of process performance during the anaerobic mono-and co-digestion of slaughter house waste through different operational modes
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Sciences(China), ISSN 1001-0742, E-ISSN 1878-7320Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Abstract [en]

The use of consecutive feeding was applied to investigate the response of the microbial biomass to a second addition of substrates in terms of biodegradation using batch tests as a promising alternative to predict the behavior of the process. Anaerobic digestion (AD) of the slaughterhouse waste (SB) and its co-digestion with manure (M), various crops (VC), and municipal solid waste were evaluated. The results were then correlated to previous findings obtained by the authors for similar mixtures in batch and semi-continuous operation modes. AD of the SB failed showing total inhibition after a second feeding. Co-digestion of the SB + M showed a significant improvement for all of the response variables investigated after the second feeding, while co-digestion of the SB + VC resulted in a decline in all of these response variables. Similar patterns were previously detected, during both the batch and the semi-continuous modes.

Keywords
Co-digestion, Biomethane potential test, Second feeding, Specific methanogenic activity, Slaughterhouse waste
National Category
Bioenergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13561 (URN)10.1016/j.jes.2017.06.004 (DOI)000427593900015 ()2-s2.0-85021321465 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-17 Created: 2018-01-17 Last updated: 2019-11-18Bibliographically approved
Kashi, S., Satari, B., Lundin, M., Sárvári Horváth, I. & Othman, M. (2017). Application of a mixture design to identify effects of susbtrates ratios and intractions on anaerobic digestion of municipal sludge, grease trapwaste, and meat processing waste. Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering, 5(6), 6156-6164
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Application of a mixture design to identify effects of susbtrates ratios and intractions on anaerobic digestion of municipal sludge, grease trapwaste, and meat processing waste
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering, ISSN 2160-6544, E-ISSN 2213-3437, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 6156-6164Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anaerobic mono- and co-digestion of two municipal sludge wastes (A and C), grease trap waste (B), and meat processing waste (D) were investigated under mesophilic temperature conditions by biochemical methane potential (BMP) assays and kinetic modeling. Wastes ratios in the mixtures were systematically selected based on Simplex Lattice mixture design, and statistical analyses were performed to elucidate possible synergetic and antagonistic effects of wastes interactions on the kinetics and ultimate methane potentials of wastes co-digestion. The mixture of 1/8A + 1/8B + 1/8C + 5/8D (VS basis) showed the highest COD and VS removals of 35.0% and 33.8%, respectively. Substrates B and D with 980 and 641 mL/g-VS methane yields, respectively, had the highest BMP. However, with reaction rate constants of 0.047 and 0.070 d−1, their methane production was very slow. It was observed that diluting these organic-rich but complex substrates with readily soluble wastes (A and C) enhanced their biogas production rate markedly. Statistical analysis showed that the interactions among the substrates in co-digestion did not have a significant impact on the ultimate cumulative methane yields. Nevertheless, these interactions proved to have synergic and antagonistic effects on the reaction rates, leading to accelerated or hindered methane production rates. As a result, while the methane yield of wastes co-digestion could be predicted by proportional summation of methane yields obtained in mono-digestions of these waste fractions, such linear regressions were unable to provide a good estimation of the rate constants. Quadratic equations, however, were found to estimate the rate constants of the co-digestion process with good accuracy

Keywords
Anaerobic co-digestion, Biochemical methane potential, KineticsMixture design, Interaction
National Category
Bioenergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13559 (URN)10.1016/j.jece.2017.11.045 (DOI)000416982600095 ()2-s2.0-85034453359 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-17 Created: 2018-01-17 Last updated: 2018-01-18Bibliographically approved
Satari, B., Palhed, J., Karimi, K., Lundin, M., Taherzadeh, M. J. & Zamani, A. (2017). Process optimization for citrus waste biorefinery via simultaneous pectin extraction and pretreatment.. BioResources, 12(1), 1706-1722
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Process optimization for citrus waste biorefinery via simultaneous pectin extraction and pretreatment.
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2017 (English)In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 1706-1722Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In a novel valorization approach for simultaneous pectin extn. and pretreatment (SPEP) of citrus waste (CW) by dil. nitric acid and ethanol, almost all of the CW was converted to bio-derived chems. in a singlestep process at a low/moderate temp. The SPEP was performed at different temps. (70 °C and 80 °C), pH (1.8, 3.0, and 4.3), and extn. times (2 h and 3 h) with a full factorial design. The max. pectin yield of 45.5% was obtained at pH 1.8, 80 °C, and 2 h. The pectin yields at pH 1.8 were much higher than at pH 4.3 and 3. Also, the degree of methyl-esterification at pH 1.8 was higher than 50%, whereas at the higher pH, low methoxyl pectins were extd. The treated CW obtained after the SPEP, free from limonene, was subjected to sep. cellulolytic enzymic hydrolysis and ethanolic fermn. The glucose yields in the enzymic hydrolyzates were higher for the CW treated at pH 1.8. The fermn. of the enzymic hydrolyzates by Mucor indicus resulted in fungal biomass yields in the range of 355 to 687 mg per g of consumed sugars. The optimum conditions for obtaining the max. SPEP yield (glucose + pectin (g) / raw material (g)*100) were pH 1.8, 80 °C, and 2 h, which resulted in a yield of 58.7% (g/g CW). [on SciFinder(R)]

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
North Carolina State University, Dep. of Wood and Paper Science, 2017
Keywords
Citrus waste, Dilute-acid, Enzymatic hydrolysis, Ethanol, Fermentation, Full factorial design, Fungal biomass, Limonene, Mucor indicus, Pectin, Pretreatment
National Category
Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-12532 (URN)10.15376/biores.12.1.1706-1722 (DOI)000397065200123 ()2-s2.0-85028313752 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-27 Created: 2017-08-27 Last updated: 2017-10-23Bibliographically approved
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